Air Alliance Houston

Clean Air, Healthy Future

Houston, TX   |  airalliancehouston.org

Mission

Air Alliance Houston envisions healthy communities with clean air, every day, for everyone. Our mission is to reduce the public health impacts from air pollution through applied research, education, and advocacy.

Ruling year info

1995

Executive Director

Bakeyah Nelson Ph.D.

Main address

3914 Leeland St

Houston, TX 77003 USA

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Formerly known as

Galveston-Houston Association for Smog Prevention (GHASP)

Mothers for Clean Air (MfCA)

ghaspmfca

EIN

76-0461030

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (W01)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (C05)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We work to reduce the pubic health impacts of air pollution and advance environmental justice in the Houston area.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Building Healthy Communities

Houston is home to over 400 chemical and manufacturing facilities, over 150 concrete batch plants and more than 140 metal recycling facilities which can expose residents to harmful air pollutants. Due to the absence of adequate land-use policies, many residents live, work and play in close proximity to these facilities.

Population(s) Served

Vehicle emissions are a significant contributor to
Houston’s high levels of particulate matter and smog.
Air toxics from mobile sources can cause damage to the immune system, reproductive and neurological
disorders, and respiratory problems such as asthma.

Population(s) Served

Chemical incidents are too frequent in the Houston
area, putting the health of residents at risk.
Communities of color and low-wealth are particularly
vulnerable as hazardous facilities are disproportionately
concentrated in these neighborhoods. Frequent
chemical incidents are not unavoidable, but they are
largely preventable.

Population(s) Served

Houston is the most heavily monitored region for
air quality, but the prevalence and proximity of
air pollution to Houston’s sprawling developments
reveals wide gaps in the existing air monitoring
network. To better understand communities’
exposure to toxic air pollution and develop
appropriate mitigation strategies, a robust
community air monitoring network is needed.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

Best Nonprofit in Houston 2004

Houston Press

Community Service Award - Civic Organization 2004

Texas Forest Service

Clean Air Champion Award 2013

Houston Galveston Area Council

Mayor's Proud Partner Award 2015

Keep Houston Beautiful

Community Organizing Recognition Award, Go Neighborhood Core Award 2014

LISC Houston

• Clean Air Excellence Award 2013

Environmental Protection Agency EPA

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Reduce industrial emissions.
Increase multi-modal transportation options.
Promote responsible land-use policies.
Expand public access to air monitoring information.
Empower grassroots leadership in historically marginalized communities.

Equity-centered Research: We research air quality challenges and their solutions to better understand impacts on public health.

Community Education: We provide information about Houston’s air quality and equip communities with the tools they need to advocate for clean air.

Collaborative Advocacy: We work with communities, advocacy groups, decision-makers, and the media to affect policies that will improve quality of life.

Financials

Air Alliance Houston
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Air Alliance Houston

Board of directors
as of 7/15/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jonathan Ross

Susman Godfrey L.L.P.

Greg Broyles

Jessica Farrar

Texas House of Representatives

Leo Golub

New Capital Management

Robert Levy

Industry Professionals for Clean Air

Ernesto Paredes

Galena Park/Jacinto City Rotary Club

Ronald Parry

Rice University

Lucy Randel

Jonathan Ross

Susman Godfrey LLP

Lauren Salomon

People Advantage; University of Houston

Tom Stock

UT Health Science Center

Terrence Thorn

JKM Consulting

Mustapha Beydoun

Houston Advanced Research Center

Stephen Pavel

Lone Star College

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No