Community Partnership for Youth

Building A Community One Child At A Time

aka CPY   |   Monterey, CA   |  www.cpy.org

Mission

Community Partnership for Youth (CPY) is a prevention program providing positive alternatives to gangs, drugs and violence while reinforcing individual strengths. Our vision is to provide our youth with a safe, structured environment that encourages healthy boundaries, positive self-esteem and the ability to make good choices for a full and successful life.

Ruling year info

1993

Executive Director

Ms. Shari R Hastey

Program Director

Mr. Benjamin P Bruce

Main address

Post Office Box 42

Monterey, CA 93942 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

77-0310237

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CPY’s program directly addresses community challenges by competently seeking to reduce the less-than-optimum conditions in a child’s home and social environment, and by giving children the tools they need to rise above those conditions and succeed. CPY offers a positive alternative to children that so desperately need one. Gangs can promote inclusion by offering mentorship and a place to belong; CPY directly competes and succeeds by offering to children the genuine attributes of mentorship, confidence building, self-esteem, and positive “family” systems. As the founding members of CPY so long ago knew, empowerment of the county’s most vulnerable population, the at-risk youth, is critical to our community’s strength. Students learn to internalize the Standards, and are provided homework and reading assistance. They develop critical one-on-one mentor and peer-to-peer relationships. They practice and model behaviors that will lead to success.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Violence Prevention Programs

Beginning as a summer program, CPY has now expanded to include: a safe place for young people to explore and discover their potential; a set of Standards to develop values and character; conflict resolution training for staff and youth; afterschool tutoring and enrichment program in five locations; all day Intersessions during school breaks; middle school leadership, job and life skills training; enrichment programs that include a Visual and Performing Arts Academy; special emphasis on learning and literacy; reading lab and/or volunteer reading program; work experience for young people, parents and grandparents.

Population(s) Served
Students
Children and youth

• In the Afterschool Mentor-Tutor program, personalized interaction serves as the backbone of CPY’s comprehensive academic program, where the emphasis is placed upon learning, not just completing assignments. Ultimately a partnership between parents, the school, and the child guarantees tutoring and mentoring tailored to a child’s demonstrated area of academic or socio-behavioral need. All staff are trained in learning styles. Mentors can structure their assistance hoping to understand and meet the complex needs of the child.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups

• The Middle School Leadership and Life Skills program was launched to meet the demands of those CPY students who participated through the 5th grade and still wished to take part in CPY activities. During the summer program these students are given the opportunity of training along with CPY staff and are given the title of “Junior Leader.”

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

CPY’s all day program during the summer break from school provides a time where students are learning academically, socially, creatively, and emotionally. Many community leaders join CPY youth and mentors to provide a truly exciting and fun learning experience.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups

CPY expands to the high school level by actually hiring young CPY graduates who have completed prerequisite requirements: volunteering for a summer session or two school quarters, signing a contract with CPY and their parents, and maintaining a 2.5 GPA in school. This enhances their job and life skills, and most importantly, self-esteem.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Ethnic and racial groups

CHOICES is an interactive live classroom workshop that empowers teens to make positive educational CHOICES to increase their career and life opportunities. In two 45-minute sessions trained community volunteers take students through real-world exercises on the consequences of dropping out and the benefits of educational attainment

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Ethnic and racial groups

SFP is a nationally and internationally recognized parenting and family program for regular and high risk families. This family skills program centers on strengthening the bonds between parents and children by learning more effective parenting skills. This increased bond helps to reduce problem behaviors, delinquency, alcohol and drug abuse in children, and serves to improve the social skills and school performance. Child maltreatment decreases as well.

Population(s) Served
Parents

With the Visual and Performing Arts Academy Program, children learn important skills that can be used in all areas of life and learning. Children learn the importance of self-expression, involvement in their local community, teamwork, collaborating and in essence, see the world they live in with fresh and open eyes. This year the students at all sites will be creating Peace Poles for a new park project around Roberts Lake. CPY firmly believes that being involved in art can change lives.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups

The Ramon Avila Technology + Design Center allows CPY to help bridge the digital divide with our community. The past several years CPY has concentrated on STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math) programming. Students have built their own computers, learned programing through coding and SCRATCH, built their own web page; learned math through managing a baseball team; and even built Solar Electric cars. All of this was done off site and was made possible through generous volunteers in our community. Now we are expanding these opportunities in our very own Technology Center.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

CPY’s campus activities came to a close on March 13th Over 2,200 hours have been spent reaching out to families. Our mentors were asked to share their encounters each week so we could look for patterns with students and families. As evidenced by our most recent participant survey, our kids ALREADY have challenges. We understand that rates of domestic violence and child abuse have increased during the COVID-19 crisis. Stress and increased isolation are risk factors for abuse. Families experiencing difficult financial issues or job loss during this time might be especially at risk. But all families will be under increased stress and isolation with varying levels of support and resources. The mentor reports are showing that they NEED our support more than ever!

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Family relationships
Social and economic status
Work status and occupations

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At risk youth in Monterey County will gain self-esteem and confidence, show a positive attitude based on integrity and respect, reinforced by the CPY Standards. They will succeed in their academic endeavors, be better prepared to avoid drugs, gangs, violence, and develop the tools they need to lead a successful life.
o 90% of students will be able to recite and demonstrate the CPY Standards.
o 85% of students will report increased self- esteem and confidence.
o 85% of students will report and demonstrate a positive attitude and respect for others.
o 15% increase in reading scores across CPY students.
o 10% of CPY students will perform better on California Standards Test (CST) and California English Language Development Test (CELDT).
o 80% of students will express interest in pursuing higher education.

In the Afterschool Mentor/Tutor Program, the backbone of CPY's comprehensive academic program is personalized interaction. In this one on one student/mentor interaction, emphasis is placed on learning, not just completing assignments. By working daily with students in academic, social and extracurricular settings, mentor/tutors bond with the children, and they in turn have a special connection in their lives. Mentors can structure their assistance hoping to understand and meet the complex needs of the child. During summer break, CPY will again host the 5 week all-day Intersession Program. In an effort to combat summer learning loss, days are filled with disguised learning and enrichment activities. The longer day also helps to allow for an even greater depth of interaction between the students and the Mentor Tutors. In an effort to support parents as their children get into middle school and high school, CPY will also be facilitating the Strengthening Families Program (SFP), a nationally recognized curriculum that provides parent, youth and family education. The program serves families with preadolescents and young adolescents. Building healthy family communication is crucial during these times in order to try to reduce substance abuse, aggressive behavior and the breakdown of the family unit.

CPY is a prevention program providing healthy alternatives for instead of drugs, gangs and violence. The total program consists of the Afterschool Mentor/Tutor Program; a five-week all-day Summer Program; a Middle School Leadership Program; a High School Life Skills Program; a seven week Strengthening Families Program (SFP); and a Visual and Performing Arts Academy. CPY believes reversing negative behavior patterns in the most at-risk youth provides the very best chance helping them to succeed. These programs offer students a real and tangible opportunity for success in school and life, and this is how CPY has strategically differentiated itself from other prevention programs. CPY works with the “whole" child, in a structured setting with a set of Standards based on teaching respect, truth telling, and treating others as you would wish to be treated. Many CPY Program Mentor Tutors have participated and learned through experience as a student in the program, and therefore are able to embody and model the Standards, thus providing students with the importance and integrity of the principles. All CPY programs require the Standards be recited by the participants together, and are reinforced by Program Mentor Tutors every day so they are internalized by the students – and the students can live their meaning. As the CPY programs demand discipline, students are required to attend program activities daily. CPY also reaches out to parents to help them with tools they may need for themselves and their children. Vulnerable students need more caring adults in their lives. Consequently, CPY offers these unique program characteristics:
1. Establishment of clear standards of behavior and personal character.
2. Comprehensive Conflict Resolution training for staff and students.
3. Close communications with parents and host schools.
4. A strong emphasis on learning; literacy is imperative.
5. Focus on healthy living through outdoor activities, sports and good nutrition.
6. An opportunity to communicate through the arts.
7. Commitment to hiring within the community.
8. Quality staffing that guarantees effective mentoring and tutoring.
9. Partnerships that directly involve the community, thereby enriching the program and benefiting those concerned.

CPY has grown as our students have grown. We have endeavored to construct programs as we look at the "whole child" and see their needs. A blessing is to have students grow up in the program and choose to give back by being mentors. Testimonials from High School Leadership Program students show the growth:

“What I have learned in CPY is how to be a leader. I learned this over the summer from current staff. Ms. Julissa taught me that a leader must be friendly, but firm. Ms. Ruth taught me how to be authoritative. Ms. Klara taught me how to keep cool in stressful situations. All of these have been very useful this summer, and I plan on using them continually in my life.”
– K Morse, HSL

“Last year, we started a Culture Club and we weren’t sure if the kids would even like it. However, we still decided to put our best into it, and this year three times as many kids joined! We learned that even through doubt, it’s better to take the lead and try.”
– K Bejarano, HSL

“What I have learned in CPY is how to be a leader. A good leader is a role model to all the kids. Being a role model requires being respectful, kind, and honest. Kids look up to the leaders, so we have to make sure we are good role models”
– O Cardenas, HSL

“The reason why I come to CPY is to lend a hand to the youth. I feel that guidance while transitioning into all these different eras of life is super important, because it can become super confusing when they don’t have help. I know that I am a strong leader, and I have a very big heart, so I enjoy being here and helping others for my own happiness.”
– I Skylark, HSL

“One of the reasons why I come to CPY is to set a positive role model for the children and by doing so hope that they won’t be easily influenced by negative alternatives. Nowadays, children can be easily influenced by other people who are either using drugs or affiliated with gangs. Being here at CPY helps children move away from those negative alternatives, in more positive ones such as doing art or helping improve the community.”
– E Pecjo, HSL

“The reason why I come to CPY is to have something positive to do with my summer. I could easily stay home all day or hang out with my friends all day, but I decided I wanted to do something more productive. I thought this would be a great opportunity to learn how to handle a little responsibility and be a little more prepared for the real world. I am proud to say CPY has helped shape me into the person I am today.”
– J Espinoza-Verduzco, HSL

“What I have learned in CPY is to be proud of myself. I was never the popular kids in school or the one student who completely committed to their studies. I would often compare myself to them and feel inferior as a result. In response to this, I like to remember the CPY Standards, especially the last one. Standard number six is about how one should reflect our beauty, be it physical or conceptual.”
– M Perez, HSL

Financials

Community Partnership for Youth
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Community Partnership for Youth

Board of directors
as of 10/21/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms Diana Ingersoll

Retired Deputy City Manager City of Seaside

Term: 2016 - 2024


Board co-chair

Mr. Maurice Solis

Planteca

Term: 2019 - 2024

Monika Campbell

Sotheby's InternationalRealtors, Carmal

Abra Tokerman

Retired Educator MPUSD Community Advocate

Edie Ellis

Cosmetologist Photographer

Jessica Piombo

Faculty, Naval Postgraduate School

Diana Ingersoll

Retired Deputy City Manager City of Seaside

Maurice Solis

Entrepreneur Panacea

Franco Pacheco

Teacher/Coach

Nancy Zarate

Sales

Michael Chapman

Retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/22/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.