PLATINUM2023

Power California

Organize, Vote, Lead

aka Mobilize the Immigrant Vote / YVote   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  www.powercalifornia.org

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Mission

Power California harnesses the energy of young voters of color and their families to create a state that is equitable, inclusive and just for everyone who calls California home.

Ruling year info

2005

Executive Director

Luis Sanchez

Main address

530 S Boyle Ave

Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

77-0651682

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (O01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (S01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Power California (PowerCA) works to make California stronger by ensuring we all have an equal say in the decisions that impact our lives. Young people are facing major challenges & inheriting a California that is unlivable for their generation; right now their voices are among the most missing from systems of governance. Over 70% of young people under the age of 30 in California are BIPOC. Millennials & Generation Z are now the largest and most diverse generation in California. With four million potential young voters, they have the power to decide issues that affect the state & set the tone for the rest of the country. Given the increasing value they place on voting & other forms of civic participation, young people are poised to play a significant factor in reshaping the political landscape. PowerCA is building a movement of young voters of color to fully participate in civic decision-making, & transform their communities through youth organizing, voter education, & mobilization.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Capacity Building

PowerCA's critical role in building the electoral organizing capacity of youth organizations across the state; collectivizing our power under one alliance and building alignment is building the power needed to advance a youth agenda. We build the capacity and maximize the impact and effectiveness of our Alliance of grassroots youth organizing groups across the state by providing campaign coaching; technical assistance and training in communications and narrative strategy running voter outreach campaigns; staffing Political Data, Inc. (PDI) and virtual phone bank and cultural strategy. Our years of building the organizing capacity of youth organizations, aligning our collective efforts, and creating safe growth spaces for political education and youth organizing, have positioned us to expand, lead, and scale up our statewide efforts. Through intensive capacity building with our youth organizing Alliance we are building lasting statewide civic engagement infrastructure.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Ethnic and racial groups
Young adults
Immigrants
Economically disadvantaged people

Our Civic Engagement Program builds the voting power of young BIPOC and their families, building a movement and base of voters to fully participate in civic decision-making and transform their communities.

PowerCA, alongside our alliance partners, builds an influential base of engaged voters with 75,000+ young people of color annually across 12+ counties. Our approach that utilizes advanced phone banking technologies, digital media, peer-to-peer outreach, cultural events, and piloting innovative relational organizing tools consistently mobilizes young voters to the polls at 10-15 points higher than the state average. The deep integration of our narrative strategy with our organizing and field strategy is maximizing the impact and effectiveness of our combined efforts in engaging voters, advancing equity and justice for our communities, and shaping policy outcomes on pressing issues.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Ethnic and racial groups
Young adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants

Leadership Development is a central part of our work across all programmatic areas:

Membership Program: builds a political home for young BIPOC (16-24) to connect, build power, and take action through political education, leadership development, community building, and cultural and wellness programming.
Power Academy: trains young organizers across the state to conduct voter education and outreach, mobilize young voters of color, develop and run phone banks and canvassing, and lead peer-to-peer texting. Power Academies provide a unique space for skill building, strategy planning, and developing integrated voter engagement plans.
Youth Organizing: builds the infrastructure needed to expand political power for young leaders of color throughout California. Through youth organizing programs, we train 1,000+ BIPOC annually in civic education and youth organizing, increasing the civic power of young people.
We are bringing a new generation into leadership and political power.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Ethnic and racial groups
Young adults
Immigrants
Economically disadvantaged people

PowerCA utilizes narrative strategy to capture the imagination of young people and organize them into a powerful block of voters and activists. PowerCA understands that in order for voters to hear and support any potential policies or solutions to transform our communities, we must connect to shared values and experiences and help masses of young people envision the transformations we seek. We continue to center youth leadership on issues that impact young people and their families, changing the way young people experience politics. Our campaigns utilize community voice to lead public education campaigns and strategic narratives that amplify youth voice, lifting up our cultural values of family, equity, and fairness, centering a message of hope with clear solutions and actions, defining and naming the issue, and how together we have the power to build and ensure communities where families can stay together and thrive.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Ethnic and racial groups
Immigrants
Economically disadvantaged people
Adolescents

Where we work

Number of members from priority population attending training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Adolescents

Related Program

Capacity Building

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our capacity building trainings are designed as training for trainers. Therefore, our results reflect the number of people we train directly and do not include additional people trained.

Number of coalition members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Capacity Building

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

PowerCA builds capacity maximizing the impact and effectiveness of our network comprised of over 20+ orgs that work in communities of color and engage young people of color.

Media reach in 6+ languages including Chinese, Korean, Somali, Spanish, Tagalog, Vietnamese, and English

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Adolescents

Related Program

Civic Engagement Campaigns

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Shift public perception and narrative about young Californians of color and their power to lead and determine California’s future through media strategy in language based on shared values.

Number of voters directly engaged

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Adolescents

Related Program

Civic Engagement Campaigns

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

PowerCA is building the power of young people of color & their families & is building a powerful & influential voting bloc of engaged voters. PowerCA has engaged over 300,000 young voters.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Power California is building the voting power and leadership of young people of color to participate in and lead systems of government, ensuring our electorate mirrors the rich diversity of California. Power California organizes young people of color in communities across California to dismantle oppressive institutions and be empowered to make decisions that work best for them. Our ability to mobilize thousands of young voters of color is a testament to the efficacy of long-term investment in building the infrastructure, capacity and voting power of young BIPOC through civic engagement. We are: 1) ensuring full and equal representation of young voters of color by building a powerful and civically engaged community of young people of color across California; 2) building the capacity, infrastructure, and strengthening the youth organizing ecosystem to deepen voter participation, engagement, shift the electorate, and mobilize young voters of color; 3) shifting public perception and narrative about young Californians of color and their power to lead and determine California’s future that centers young people and reshapes the way young people think about how the government and economy should work; 4) building an organizing and political home for tens of thousands of young people of color that can advance a youth-centered agenda; and 5) positioning Power California as a resource and voice for young people building towards our long-term vision for an economy and democracy that works for young people and their families.

Leadership development, political education, organizing skills and strategy, and civic education are core components of our approach towards building youth power long-term and ensuring young people have the tools and resources they need to develop and lead youth organizing work. PowerCA goes beyond traditional civic engagement programs, building deep relationships, talking about shared lived experiences, and creating opportunities to lead on the issues and change we want to see in our communities. Building this movement at the speed we trust, engaging young people beyond voting, getting to know them, their families and what they care about is key in building a sustained voting base around an agenda rooted in justice.

PowerCA has established a robust infrastructure for youth organizing and civic engagement in under-invested regions of California. When we invest in young people we see the impact in our communities, on a state level, and across the country. Expanding our youth organizing work builds a powerful base of young voters of color with the power to impact elections and shape the course of California, our local regions and neighborhoods Expanding our work allows us to create hubs in areas currently lacking collective youth organizing efforts. Young people of color are the overwhelming majority of youth in California and when engaged, resourced, and centered in the work we can ensure that power truly rests with them.

Our Key Strategies Include:

1) Building a youth voter base that mobilizes 200,000+ young voters annually;

2) Building a membership base of 10,000+ BIPOC young people addressing the gaps in the youth organizing pipeline & building stronger leadership pathways;

3) Utilizing art and culture to shift the way young people experience elections & use their civic power both inside & outside of elections and changing the way young people of color are valued & positioned as leaders and decision-makers through narrative strategy in order to shift power to our communities;

4) Building the next generation of leadership of young people to develop, organize, & lead local and statewide campaigns for racial justice & equity through training, capacity building, & leadership development;

5) Building youth organizing capacity, infrastructure, & leadership in underrepresented communities with 20+ youth organizing partners across the state.

Since 2016 PowerCA has built the electoral organizing capacity of 30+ youth organizations across the state & engaged over 500,000 young voters in California resulting in real impact at the polls. By collectivizing our power under one alliance & building alignment at the regional & state level, PowerCA maximizes the strength of individual organizations, deepening our collective impact & increasing the political power of young people. Additionally, PowerCA has engaged young people of color in regions across the state where deep investment in youth of color organizing did not exist, growing our base of young leaders of color & building the political power needed to advance a youth agenda. As the only organization developing & sustaining youth of color organizing in underinvested regions of the state we are increasing the civic infrastructure, leadership, & electoral power of young people of color. This level of impact is possible due to our unique approach that centers young voters of color at the statewide level in the civic engagement field.

Since its inception, PowerCA has centralized the importance of narrative strategy as critical to capturing the imagination of young people & organizing them into a powerful block of voters & activists. PowerCA understands that in order for voters to hear & support any potential policies or solutions to transform our communities, we must connect to shared values & experiences & help masses of young people envision the transformations we seek. Through intensive capacity building with our alliance of youth organizing partners, we are building lasting statewide civic engagement infrastructure. In building up the capacity & leadership in our communities we are preparing the next generation to lead for the long-term & shifting power in California.

PowerCA trains youth & young adults in community organizing & electoral organizing building one of the largest bases of youth leaders across the state. By partnering & building relationships with school districts, elected officials, & county registrars to prioritize civic engagement in underrepresented communities we are increasing the civic learning & leadership of young people of color. Through our innovative approach to movement building, civic engagement, & leadership development young leaders, students, & volunteers are able to connect & engage their peers in civic engagement actions & activities ensuring our work reaches far beyond the thousands of young people we train & educate through our various program areas.

PowerCA fulfills a critical niche in the civic engagement ecosystem by activating young leaders of color & building the capacity & infrastructure for this generation to step fully into their economic, civic, & cultural power. Our long-term investment of building the infrastructure, capacity, & voting power of young people of color contributes to the long-term movement of building power with young people across California.

PowerCA leads campaigns that increase the health, safety, and well-being of young people of color throughout California and creates spaces for youth leaders to engage in a larger dialogue around democracy, inclusion, and equity.

Recent Accomplishments:
Engaged and mobilized over 200,000 young voters annually to exercise their political voice and power
Registered and pre-registered over 85,000 young voters of color expanding the electorate
Since 2018 Power California has turned out young voters at a record 71% on average for the past elections,12 points higher than the state average
Co-launched Working Families Party (WFP) in Los Angeles and the Central Valley with a strong leadership role in statewide WFP
Power California engaged and mobilized over 45,000 young voters for the 2021 Special Election targeting young voters throughout the Central Valley
Developed the leadership of over 3,000 young people of color who are now key decision-makers and leading civic engagement tables changing the landscape of California
Built a base of supporters with over 100,000 young leaders of color across California
Built the capacity of 20+ youth organizations organizing and building power in places like East Contra Costa, the Central Valley, and Southeast Los Angeles in areas where little organizing with young people of color previously existed
PowerCA with our youth organizing partners won the right to vote in Oakland School Board elections for 16 and 17 year olds
Passed resolution to study the feasibility of lowering the voting age to 16 in Los Angeles school district elections
Won $1M for rent, mortgage, and utilities assistance for Merced County residents
Won $1.25M in COVID federal relief money to be invested into youth jobs as part of a Youth Employment Program in Merced

Over the past 5 years PowerCA has established a robust infrastructure for youth organizing and civic engagement statewide through organizing and activating youth leaders, ultimately building youth power by implementing capacity building and leadership development strategies. We will continue to strengthen the capacity of our alliance partners and grow a robust ecosystem of youth organizing needed to advance a youth agenda.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Power California
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Power California

Board of directors
as of 01/11/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dana Ginn Parades

Momentum Institute

Term: 2020 -

Luis Sanchez

Power California

Dana Ginn Paredes

Momentum Institute

Ashley Thomas

Program Manager, USC Equity Research Institute

Randy Villegas

Political Science, College of the Sequoias

Christian Arana

Policy Director, Latino Community Foundation

Tyler Okeke

University of Chicago

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/11/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/11/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.