PLATINUM2022

EL FUTURO

Nurturing stronger familias to live out their dreams

Durham, NC   |  www.elfuturo-nc.org

Mission

El Futuro's mission is to nurture stronger familias to live out their dreams.

Ruling year info

2005

Executive Director

Dr. Luke Smith MD

Main address

2020 Chapel Hill Road, Suite 23

Durham, NC 27707 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

80-0122334

NTEE code info

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Alcohol, Drug and Substance Abuse, Dependency Prevention and Treatment (F20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Over the last three decades, North Carolina has experienced one of the fastest rates of Latino population growth in the nation - a population that is now 1 million and growing. Although Latino families arrive in our communities seeking better lives for their families, a disproportionate number face mental health setbacks related to traumas experienced during the migration experience and due to living in poverty. Yet Latino families face a number of barriers to receiving adequate mental health treatment, including lack of bilingual services, lack of affordable care options, and not knowing where to turn for help. El Futuro is the only clinic in North Carolina that offers a comprehensive suite of bilingual mental health services for Latino families (psychiatry, therapy, and case management), and to this day, we serve as a safety net for families who have nowhere else to turn for help.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Child and Family Mental Health Treatment

Bilingual, outpatient mental health and substance abuse treatment for Spanish speakers in NC, offered in a welcoming environment of healing and hope.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
People of Latin American descent

Where we work

Awards

2006 Mental Health Association in North Carolina Heroes in the Fight Award 2006

Mental Health Association

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients who report general satisfaction with their services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Substance abusers, People of Latin American descent, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Child and Family Mental Health Treatment

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Clients take surveys upon conclusion of their treatment and we strive for 95% satisfaction.

Number of people who received clinical mental health care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Child and Family Mental Health Treatment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients who show a measurable decrease in PTSD symptoms

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Child and Family Mental Health Treatment

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We define this metric as % of patients who experienced clinical improvements or stabilization.

Number of clinic visits provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Adults, Children and youth, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Child and Family Mental Health Treatment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This data reflects "treatment sessions" which includes virtual appointments.

Number of clinic sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Immigrants and migrants, Economically disadvantaged people, At-risk youth

Related Program

Child and Family Mental Health Treatment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We have clinics in Durham and Siler City, North Carolina, as well as a virtual model of therapeutic services which we call TeleFuturo

Number of clients who report a greater sense of purpose and improved overall wellness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Immigrants and migrants, Economically disadvantaged people, At-risk youth

Related Program

Child and Family Mental Health Treatment

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is a percentage and we define it as improved function in social and family roles.

Number of new clients within the past 12 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Adults, Children and youth, Immigrants and migrants, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Child and Family Mental Health Treatment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of support groups offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Child and Family Mental Health Treatment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These numbers are for types of support groups. Each type meets on a regular basis (weekly, monthly, etc.)

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

El Futuro has two overarching strategic goals:

1. Ensure more Latino families in North Carolina have access to quality, immigrant-welcoming mental health treatment services; and

2. Develop into a national model and resource center for Latino mental health treatment.

Ultimately, our goal is for Latino families to be able to function at their best and get back to their dreams for the future that brought them to our communities in the first place. Because unmet mental health needs place undue strains on our educational, social services, economic, and criminal justice systems, by nurturing stronger families with culturally-sensitive mental health treatment approaches, we're also building a healthier community for all of North Carolina.

Our strategies for nurturing stronger familias and meeting our larger, strategic goals include:

1. Provide quality, immigrant-welcoming, outpatient mental health treatment in a professional, clinic-based environment. El Futuro provides a full suite of mental health and substance use treatments at our two regional clinics (in Durham and Siler City, NC). We use nationally recognized, trauma-informed interventions proven effective with low-income, Spanish-speaking populations. We provide individual, family, and group treatments through a holistic approach to care.

2. Provide additional mental health treatment and support for low-income Latino families through community-based and rural-reaching activities. To make our services more accessible for Latino families, many of whom face disproportionate barriers to care, we extend our services beyond the clinic doors through school-based and telehealth services - an area we are actively expanding. Because of the shortage of bilingual providers in North Carolina, we've served clients from over 20 counties across the state. We also provide case management services to ensure that immigrant families have access to additional community resources, thereby reducing the stressors that too often impact mental health outcomes.

3. Share knowledge gained over our 14-year history regarding effective Latino mental health practices with other providers serving Latino families in North Carolina and beyond. Because of our history of providing culturally appropriate, trauma-informed care to low-income Latino families, we are often called upon to offer training and technical assistance to others. With funding from the Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust and The Duke Endowment, we launched La Mesita - a statewide, Latino Mental Health Provider Network (already almost 300 members and growing) to help reduce professional isolation and burnout among providers serving Latino families, and we are actively expanding other training and technical assistance activities.

4. Conduct research and evaluation to improve Latino mental health outcomes. El Futuro engages in research when it furthers our mission and helps the people we serve. Our goal is to expand our applied research, program evaluation, and dissemination activities in strategic ways, developing into a national model and resource center for Latino mental health and substance use treatment services. To achieve this goal, we actively partner with RTI International and the national-level Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. Other historic partners in this work include the National Institutes of Mental Health, University of North Carolina, Duke University, and more.

El Futuro employs a comprehensive suite of licensed, mental health professionals, all of whom are bilingual and are trained in immigrant-welcoming (trauma-informed, culturally-sensitive) mental health treatment approaches. Our clinicians include psychiatrists, licensed professional counselors, licensed clinical social workers, case managers, and more. We've grown our staff over time in order to meet the growing need for our services.

In our 17-year history, we've also developed a strong sense of trust (confianza) in the Latino community - a population that has historically been hesitant to seek care from many community organizations. This trust helps to overcome mental health stigma and other treatment barriers, and means that the majority of our referrals come from friends and family of our clients.

We also rely on strong and diverse partnerships to carry out our work. From community partners who refer clients for our services and partner on specific programs, to funding organizations and individual donors, we've developed a robust network of support. Funding partners include those at the local, state, regional, and national levels, including support from the Oak Foundation, Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina, RTI International, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, National Institutes of Mental Health, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, The Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust, The Duke Endowment, and many more. These diverse partnerships ensure consistent sources of revenue outside of the typical, insurance billing process, making it possible for us to provide a safety net resource to those without adequate insurance coverage who are most vulnerable in our state.

In El Futuro's 17-year history, we've provided proven mental health treatments to over 10,000 Latino individuals in North Carolina. We typically serve 2,000 Latino clients each year.

Last year, ninety-two percent (92%) of our clients experienced clinical improvements or stabilization, meaning fewer symptoms of depression, anxiety, PTSD, and more. Seventy-seven percent (77%) of our clients experienced functional improvements or stabilization. Ninety-eight percent (98%) of our clients reported satisfaction with our services.

To ensure that we meet our bold strategic goals, we're actively growing the following programs and services:

- Evidence-based mental health treatment approaches proven particularly effective in low-income Latino communities, including Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CPT), Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT), Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress (SPARCS), and more.
- Telehealth and other brief treatment approaches, ensuring more Latino families gain access to the care they need when they need it most.
- Cutting-edge group treatments for trauma survivors, including Trauma-Sensitive Yoga, dialectical behavioral therapy-based skills groups, and more.
- The La Mesita (NC Latino Mental Health Provider) Network, including webinars, case consultations, learning cohorts, and more.
- Training and technical assistance for other providers, through residencies and internships, La Mesita, the ECHO model, and more.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Spanish-speaking children and adults with mental health challenges.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Some of our clients for the substance abuse program have lost their license and are unable to visit the clinic in person to pay for their services, so we are finding new ways to provide online payment options. We have adjusted times and dates of our therapeutic groups based on when clients are more available.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, Due to the sensitive therapist/client relationship, we are careful with feedback requests.,

Financials

EL FUTURO
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

EL FUTURO

Board of directors
as of 08/11/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Rosa Gonzalez-Guarda

Duke University

Term: 2021 - 2022

Cecilia Barja Chamas

NC Congress of Latino Organizations

Kevin FitzGerald

UNC's Kenan-Flagler Business School

Hope Williams

Legal Aid of North Carolina

Jenni Owen

Office of Gov. Roy Cooper

Luis Alvarez

Mante Masonry and Bull City Brick

Margaret "Peggy" Bentley

UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health

Richard Bruch

EmergeOrtho, P.A.

Lister Delgado

IDEA Fund Partners

Bruno Estigarribia

University of North Carolina

Karlina Matthews

UNC Health

Manuel "Manny" Nieto

Truist

Merywen "Wenny" Wigley

IQVIA

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/30/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/30/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.