TEXAS AFTER VIOLENCE PROJECT

Austin, TX   |  http://www.texasafterviolence.org

Mission

The Texas After Violence Project is a community-based archive and documentary project cultivating deeper understandings of the impacts of state-sanctioned violence on individuals, families, and communities. Our mission is to conduct responsible, inclusive, and ethical research, and to build an archive of stories and other materials that shift narrative power to marginalized and oppressed communities and promote restorative and transformative justice.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director

Gabriel Solis

Main address

P.O. Box 41476

Austin, TX 78704 USA

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EIN

80-0294810

NTEE code info

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (S05)

Citizen Participation (W24)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

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Memory Work and Community Archive

As a community-based archive, we preserve the voices, experiences, and perspectives of people directly impacted by violence in Texas. In addition to our digital archive of stories, we preserve photographs, artwork, correspondence, case files, and other ephemera. We collaborate with our record creators to ensure this memory work is done responsibly and inclusively. Our collection is housed at the Human Rights Documentation Initiative, a post-custodial archive at the University of Texas at Austin. As a founding member of the Community Archives Collaborative, we regularly work with other small community-based archives to document our processes and build a roadmap for other community organizations seeking to disrupt the institutional power of traditional archives.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families
Incarcerated people
Victims and oppressed people

We collaborate with artists, activists, narrators, and writers to share compelling narratives from our archive through publications, podcasts, documentaries, and public art projects. This has taken the form of booklets and zines, a live storytelling event in collaboration with the Texas Observer and PEN America, as well as art installations about the death penalty from our artist-in-residence Mark Menjivar. Most recently we collaborated with LookoutFM and Dublab to create a series of podcast episodes featuring interviews from our Sheltering Justice project, and in 2020 we welcomed our first writer-in-residence, poet Jorge Antonio Renaud.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families
Incarcerated people
Victims and oppressed people

We regularly lead trainings on conducting oral history interviews in the aftermath of violence and trauma; planning community oral history projects; operating audio-visual equipment; and creating digital multimedia for social change. We also work with educators across the US to teach students about documenting violence; public history; community archival practice; and trauma-centered narrative research.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Sheltering Justice: Stories from the Intersection of COVID-19 and Mass Incarceration aims to document, archive, and share stories about the real time impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the lives, health, and well-being of our communities and the compounding impact of incarceration. We have recorded and published over 20 oral history interviews as part of this project, and we have partnered with the Inside Books Project Archive, Mourning Our Losses, and Austin Anarchist Black Cross to collect additional materials documenting the experiences of people who are incarcerated during this pandemic. This growing collection of public materials is viewable at the project website, shelteringjustice.texasafterviolence.org.

Population(s) Served
Family relationships
Health
Incarcerated people

We highlight the moral cost of mass incarceration while honoring the lives of all who die while living or working behind bars.

Mourning Our Losses was created in April 2020 by a volunteer group of educators, artists, students, and organizers—many of us formerly incarcerated—committed to the release of people from prisons, jails, and immigration facilities across the United States during the Covid-19 pandemic..

Mourning Our Losses was born out of anger that governors, judges, and legislators throughout the nation are willing to sacrifice the lives of people in confinement. The project was also born out of personal grief and anxiety over the fate of our friends, students, and colleagues marooned inside. For those of us who were formerly incarcerated, our pain is amplified by the knowledge that a few months or years are all that have separated us from these horrors.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Incarcerated people
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Awards

Best of Austin, Media Category 2010

Austin Chronicle

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

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Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At a time when interpersonal and state violence in our communities and across the country leaves us searching for alternative, nonviolent ways to more effectively prevent and respond to violence, the stories and experiences of those who have directly experienced interpersonal or state violence, loss, and trauma are too often ignored or silenced.

We aim to collect and preserve these stories. Our hope is that they may serve as resources for community dialogue and public policy about ways to prevent and respond to violence with nonviolent policies and practices that also meet the needs of all individuals, families, and communities impacted.

Financials

TEXAS AFTER VIOLENCE PROJECT
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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TEXAS AFTER VIOLENCE PROJECT

Board of directors
as of 03/30/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Jim Kuhn


Board co-chair

Glenna Balch

Walter Long

no affiliation

Betty Snyder

Southern Methodist University

James Kuhn

University of Texas

Charlotte Nunes

Lafayette College

Naomi Paik

University of Illinois

Glenna Balch

Celeste Henery