ADVANCED ENERGY ECONOMY INSTITUTE

Transforming Policy. Expanding Markets.

aka AEEI   |   Washington, DC   |  https://www.aee.net/aeei

Mission

AEE Institute’s mission is to accelerate an equitable transition to 100% clean energy and electrified transportation.

Ruling year info

2009

Chief Executive Officer

Nat Kreamer

Main address

1010 Vermont Ave NW Suite 1050

Washington, DC 20005 USA

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EIN

80-0373801

NTEE code info

Pollution Abatement and Control Services (C20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In order to achieve significant climate progress, the transition to advanced energy solutions must be rapid and on a large scale. It is not enough to retire coal from the U.S. power grid or set emission reduction targets; replacement solutions such as energy productivity improvements, renewables, electric vehicles, and improved energy storage must be broadly utilized. Achieving this goal would bring significant public benefits, including economic development and job creation, grid resiliency, lower energy prices, and reduced carbon emissions. A primary barrier to this future is that policymakers at the state and federal levels do not fully understand advanced energy technologies and how best to integrate them into the existing power system. Advanced Energy Economy Institute (AEE Institute) is working to remove this barrier by engaging and educating policymakers about advanced energy technologies and how to integrate them, and by developing relevant and reliable research and analysis.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Wholesale Markets

Many of the key barriers to widespread advanced energy deployment are found in wholesale electricity market rules and structures that prevent clean technologies from entering the markets, and in some cases even serve to protect incumbent fossil fuel generators and put advanced energy technologies at a disadvantage. This has the impact of increased carbon emissions, decreased reliability and consumer choice, and higher net costs to consumers. These market rules can also serve to undermine transformational state climate policies that have been recently enacted. Wholesale electricity markets are regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) (with the exception of the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT)) and, for two-thirds of the electricity customers in the United States, operated by independent regional transmission organizations (RTOs) (including ERCOT) that develop the market rules and run the markets day-to-day. FERC oversees all of the RTOs, approving all RTO rules and policies if it finds that they are "just, reasonable, and not unduly discriminatory or preferential."

AEE Institute has works to engage and educate FERC commissioners and staff, as well as policymakers in Congress (who are responsible for FERC oversight and approval of new Commissioner nominees), regarding the benefits of advanced energy technologies and the need to remove barriers to their participation in wholesale markets.

Population(s) Served

Despite progress on reducing emissions, the U.S. fleet of power plants continues to be a major source of carbon pollution. The system's current regulatory framework largely incentivizes the building of new power plants connected to traditional delivery infrastructure and lacks the necessary framework for the integration of large numbers of EVs, which compounds our climate problem. In order to achieve a low-carbon future, the U.S. will require new utility business models that incentivize integration of cleaner advanced energy technologies, including low- and zero-emission electricity generation and EVs, which together can lead to deep decarbonization of the economy.

AEE Institute’s 21st Century Electricity System (21CES) program has been shaping “utility of the future” discussions across the country that are aimed at modernizing utility business models and regulations to incentivize integration of clean, reliable advanced energy technologies. AEE Institute has become an authoritative voice on critical 21CES issues, educating and engaging government policy officials, regulators, and utilities on ways they can change existing business and regulatory models to encourage access to and expand deployment of innovative technologies.

Population(s) Served

In 2016, carbon emissions from the transportation sector surpassed emissions from the power sector for the first time. Electric vehicles (EVs), powered by a rapidly decarbonizing power sector, represent a key tool for tackling transportation emissions while simultaneously enabling the power sector to continue its improvement toward a carbon free future since EVs are essentially mobile batteries that can help integrate higher levels of renewables. However, electrification presents an existential threat to the massive oil industry and is under attack.

AEE Institute has therefore been engaging on transportation policy to create meaningful climate impact. Our advanced transportation work provides thought leadership and educational efforts with a goal of increasing the deployment of EVs and reducing carbon emissions. We work with a coalition of vehicle manufacturers that produce light, medium, and heavy-duty vehicles; charging infrastructure providers; vehicle fleet operators; and firms providing supportive technologies and services to identify solutions that work for all stakeholders. Our work focuses on five key areas: vehicle incentives, mechanisms for accelerating infrastructure deployment, utility regulation of vehicle charging, policy designed to encourage fleet adoption -- especially for school and transit buses, and supporting transportation emission regulations. Our work includes research and analysis; convenings of stakeholders to find alignment and prioritize policy solutions; educational sessions for policymakers that are designed to produce informed EV policy; regulatory filings for public utility commissions on a range of issues that are critical to accelerating the use of EVs; litigation to protect federal and state vehicle emission standards; and communications in support of all these efforts. AEE Institute’s advanced transportation team is currently engaged in key states with large vehicle markets and active EV policy conversations, and/or the potential to serve as an example for other states and regions.

Population(s) Served

Public Utility Commissions (PUCs) and other entities with similar names (e.g., Public Service Commissions, Departments of Public Utilities) regulate the nation's investor-owned electric and natural gas utilities. Their decisions influence $100 billion per year in utility infrastructure investment expected through 2020 and have a direct impact on utility bills for industrial, commercial, and residential customers. Commissioners and their staff come from a variety of backgrounds and face a daunting task in keeping up-to-date with the rapid advancements in new energy technologies, the benefits that they bring, and the ways in which these technologies are fundamentally reshaping the electric system. To help Commissioners, their staff and others navigate these complex issues, AEE Institute hosts regional commissioner forums and in-depth trainings on essential issues.

Population(s) Served

AEE Institute is engaged at the state, regional, and national levels to educate policymakers about the broad public benefits of advanced energy, and to inform the development and implementation of policies that would expand clean energy and reduce carbon emissions. We do so in a way that builds alignment with other key stakeholders to find win-win solutions that can help regulators and key policymakers identify reforms that can support the accelerated growth of clean, secure, and affordable energy. Our messaging is not centered on climate or environment, but instead highlights the economic benefits of building an advanced energy economy including job creation, business and infrastructure investment, lower consumer costs, and increased resiliency—a critical voice in the current political environment.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Advanced Energy Economy 2011

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Regulatory Engagements

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

21st Century Electricity System

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Established in 2011, AEE’s impact builds year over year. Our metrics reflect policy transformation over time.

Legislative Gains

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

State Policy Engagement

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Established in 2011, AEE’s impact builds year over year. Our metrics reflect policy transformation over time.

Active Policy Campaigns

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

State Policy Engagement

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Established in 2011, AEE’s impact builds year over year. Our metrics reflect policy transformation over time.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

AEE Institute sees several critical opportunities to create change in a growing portion of the country. These opportunities include removing barriers to advanced energy technologies in wholesale markets, thought leadership to create new utility business models that align utility financial interests with policy goals, policymaker education in key states, and increasing understanding of the benefits of transportation electrification. Our theory of change is that through long-term persistent engagement we can build and deepen relationships with key policymakers, becoming a go-to resource on energy issues. This is necessary, as future prosperity depends on meeting growing demand with energy that is secure, clean and affordable – that is, advanced energy. Though widely varied, advanced energy technologies and services work together to make the best use of multiple resources for meeting energy needs – smart grid technologies moving power where it’s needed and protecting against outages, efficiency measures reducing waste and stretching all our energy sources further, and much more. Advanced energy technologies and products are also providing a host of other benefits, including cost savings, cleaner air, and greater energy security.

AEE Institute works to raise awareness of the public benefits and opportunities of advanced energy by providing easy access to critical data to drive the policy discussion on key issues through commissioned research and reports, data aggregation and analytic tools. The organization also does public education, media campaigns, and targeted outreach about the benefits of advanced energy to communities across the country. AEE Institute provides a forum where leaders can address energy challenges and opportunities facing the United States through its own convenings and through the provision of educational, issue-based content at other public conferences.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome,

Financials

ADVANCED ENERGY ECONOMY INSTITUTE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ADVANCED ENERGY ECONOMY INSTITUTE

Board of directors
as of 9/17/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Matt Rogers

Incite.org

Hemant Taneja

Ted White

Moye White LLP

Matt Rogers

Nest Labs

Suedeen Kelly

Jenner and Block

Audrey Zibelman

Google X

Melanie Nakagawa

Princeville Capital

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/07/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/27/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.