The Snake River Alliance Education Fund Inc.

Idaho's Nuclear Watchdog and Advocate for Clean Energy

aka Snake River Alliance   |   Boise, ID   |  www.snakeriveralliance.org

Mission

The Snake River Alliance serves as Idaho's grassroots nuclear watchdog and advocate for clean energy. We raise community awareness about the dangers of nuclear waste, weapons and power while working to identify and promote sustainable alternatives. We do our work through advocacy, collaboration, education and grassroots organizing.

Ruling year info

1984

Interim Executive director

Ms. Leigh Ford

Main address

PO Box 1731

Boise, ID 83701 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

82-0386993

NTEE code info

Energy Resources Conservation and Development (C35)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (A05)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The problems we are addressing are 1) climate change, and 2) reducing the threat of nuclear contamination. America's experience with civilian nuclear technology began in Idaho under the "Atoms for Peace" program which first demonstrated the use of nuclear fission for electric generation. Idaho now has significant nuclear contamination and an ongoing Superfund clean up program at the Idaho National Laboratory. Fossil fuel technologies also had a huge impact on our environment and people. The Snake River Alliance is working towards 100% safe, clean and renewable energy for Idaho and the world. The Snake River Alliance watchdogs activities of the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho regarding nuclear waste clean up and safe long term containment of nuclear materials. The Alliance also organizes programs to support energy conservation, renewable energy and to grow sustainable energy.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Nuclear

Monitor federal cleanup of nuclear waste sitting about the S nake River aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory. Engage affected communities, assure technical review and provide public education about activities and clean up.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of national media pieces on the topic

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, Multiracial people, Activists, Farmers, Low-income people

Related Program

Nuclear

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Stop nuclear contamination of the Snake River Plain Aquifer and clean-up the existing nuclear waste at the Idaho National Laboratory.

Stop the Dirty Dozen, a twelve nuclear reactor power plant proposed for construction over our freshwater aquifer and lifeblood of southern Idaho. We are opposed to the generation of more nuclear waste.

Facilitate the transition to a 100% carbon and nuclear free energy future in Idaho.

Support environmental justice and personal actions that support sustainable lifestyles.

Education -- we are a watchdog, educating the public through speaking engagements, art exhibits, publications, and online materials.

Collaboration -- we work with other citizen groups, shareholders, utility leaders and public servants on common goals.

Public Participation -- we represent the public and affected communities in regulatory and government proceedings.

Citizen Engagement -- we organize and empower citizens to take action.

The Alliance has 2 professional staff in Boise and a 9-person volunteer board of directors. We develop online resources, printed newsletters, action alerts and educational materials. We actively collaborate with other organizations with similar goals to create larger impact. We take part in community events, were the first nonprofit to launch a solarize program in Idaho and helped another nonprofit start a solarize program in eastern Idaho.

We have stopped misguided programs such as the injection of nuclear waste into our aquifer, nuclear weapons production facilities and blocked nuclear waste from coming into the state in violation of Idaho's 1995 Nuclear Waste Agreement. We have coordinated many public education campaigns to educate citizens, advocated for policy changes with elected representatives and organized people living in the most affected rural communities.

Working in coalition with our allies, we were able to help educate communities across our region about the dangers and economic burden the Dirty Dozen - a 720 Megawatt 12 module nuclear power plant - would pose. As of early 2021, several communities abandoned the Dirty Dozen leaving only 99MW of the 720 MW subscribed.

No one wants their water polluted or their children's future compromised. To reach a wider public we use nontraditional strategies such as public art shows, in-school programs and direct hands-on solarize projects to change public opinion and local politics.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Locally we serve over 300,000 Idahoans who rely on the Snake River aquifer for fresh water. In national coalitions we support efforts to secure nuclear waste as safely and as close to the point of creation as possible, oppose creating more nuclear waste, and ensure frontline communities are represented and part of any decision-making process.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We developed a new logo and created a new website based on feedback from members and board. We also became more active on social media and started using less paper after learning the majority of the members we surveyed prefer electronic communication over paper.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    People feel appreciated and connected to our team when they feel their opinion matters. If our supporters take the time to offer meaningful comments, we believe a meaningful response is warranted. We take all feedback seriously and value people's unique perspectives and opinions. Member feedback is one of a few factors we take in consideration when evaluating our program work. Ultimately major decisions are put to a staff and/or board vote.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

The Snake River Alliance Education Fund Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Snake River Alliance Education Fund Inc.

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Rinda Just

volunteer

Term: 2019 - 2021


Board co-chair

Amy O'Brien

Tim Andreae

Chad Worth

Julie Hoefnagels

Terry Kaufmann

Bryant Kusy

Amy O'Brien

Hannah Smay

Jerry Riener

Kelly Cox

Rinda Just

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/24/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Jewish
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/23/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.