Colorado Boys Ranch Foundation

Strengthening Families Throughout Colorado

aka CBR YouthConnect   |   Lakewood, CO   |  http://www.cbryouthconnect.org

Mission

Our mission is to provide troubled youth with the means to become hopeful and productive citizens. To achieve this mission we serve, help, assist, and inspire.

Ruling year info

1971

President / Chief Executive Officer

Terese Scofidio

Main address

12567 W. Cedar Drive Suite 101

Lakewood, CO 80228 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-0500375

NTEE code info

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2021, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Connections Build Resilience (CBR) - Home-Based Therapy

The CBR approach involves highly skilled, trauma-informed, social work practices integrated with social-emotional learning principles. The CBR approach utilizes evidence-based principles (TF-CBT and TBRI), promising practices, on-going professional guidance, standards and training. And, all services emphasize to clients the importance of civic responsibility.

CBR Home-Based Service Providers give guidance and support for managing family dynamics; addressing conflicts and special needs. Providers also teach family life skills and routines, help the family access medical and mental health services, bridge with the school systems to help youth stay in school and avoid delinquency, and address confounding issues that stress the youth and family system. CBR services focus on empowerment, encouragement and accountability.

This strength-based, motivational approach helps build relationships and engagement with youth and families

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

Specialized Mentoring is a highly skilled, trauma-informed process for inspiring and helping youth to build resilience and positive character. Specialized Mentoring offers youth repetitive coaching and feedback; normalized socialization; purposeful community experiences; and opportunities to explore their interests, their talents, values and beliefs.

Specialized Mentoring was developed following a multi-year demonstration project of the STORY Program funded by the DANIELS FUND involving 250 risk-laden youth from alternative schools, day treatment centers, dysfunctional families, juvenile diversion and homelessness.

Specialized Mentoring helps youth…
· Learn and practice reciprocal relationships and regulation of emotional states
· Build essential adolescent life skills
· Develop a sense of accomplishment and mastery
· Gain new hope and positive energy for the future

Applying social-emotional learning principles, the “Specialized Mentor” offers a neutral and supportive role; takes the youth’s lead; helps the youth explore their personal interests and aspirations; models and shares insights; connects youth to community resources; and inspires hope.

Through conversations, purposeful community experiences and creative projects (including i-Pads with APPS and other technologies), youth are encouraged to creatively express their own personal STORY and think through the values and beliefs they want to live by. They are helped to discover their own power to live their best personal story and guide their own lives no matter their personal circumstances.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Supervised Visitation and Therapeutic Supervised Visitation services are designed to observe and monitor the interactions between a child and his/her non-residential parent(s) during that parent’s court-designated parenting time. Both services involve a trained CBR YouthConnect staff member who objectively observes parent-child interactions in a department approved controlled or community-based setting. The visitation supervisor ensures that the guidelines set by the Court or referral agency are followed, and submits progress reports and recommendations to the referral source as required

Supervised Visitation services involve little intervention by the visitation supervisor; during these visits the supervisor simply observes and documents the parent-child interactions, only intervening when safety concerns are present.

Therapeutic Supervised Visitations includes both the direct observation/documentation of visits as well as intervention with parents to improve parenting skills, eliminate safety concerns and reduce the time in out-of-home care. The staff member provides immediate support, feedback and interventions for parents when interacting with their children. The trained staff remains present and an active participant throughout the visit offering skills to build on the family’s strengths and correct observed weaknesses. A focus on Parenting Skills Development in which families receive individual instruction with an emphasis on attachment and bonding, alternatives to physical discipline, household management, consistent delivery of rules, effective communication skills, consequences and rewards, knowledge of developmental milestones and nutrition.

Population(s) Served
Families
Parents

AAT is a strategic, skill-based therapy requiring professional knowledge and experience to successfully enhance individual, group and family therapies. The AAT therapist skillfully and thoughtfully involves the animal as a part of the relationship building process; as a source of information about individual and family dynamics; as a partner in providing feedback and insight to the client(s) relative to treatment goals; and as a motivator for change. Therapy goals are tailored to fit the assessed therapy needs of the youth and family. AAT professionals have a unique working relationship with their therapy animal(s), based on trust, respect and compassion. Modeling this interaction between therapist and therapy animal often prompts a client’s insight, motivation and subsequent engagement in therapy.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Outpatient Restoration Education services are designed to be provided to youth involved with the juvenile justice system and who are deemed by the court to be incompetent to initially proceed with typical court proceedings. Youth with an identified mental and or intellectual disability are appropriate with the average age ranging from 10-21 years old. Restoration Education services are provided in the least-restrictive settings given the individual youth’s presenting concerns in accordance with best-practice standards utilizing a standardized curriculum provided by OBH. Education takes place through multiple learning formats given the individual youth’s learning style and determined need for reiteration.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our mission is to provide troubled youth with the means to become hopeful and productive citizens. To achieve this mission we serve, help, assist, and inspire. We serve children and families in crisis referred by county child welfare departments, courts and youth corrections. We help hard-to-reach youth from troubled homes, alternative schools, diversion programs and treatment centers with histories of school drop-out, homelessness, teen pregnancy, delinquency and mental health. We assist all youth, parents and families manage the stresses, confusion, and trends in our society. We inspire kids and families to make strong connections and create their own paths.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The organization has seen the need for Substance Use Disorder support and is in the process of working on developing a program to better meet the needs of our clients in this arena.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Colorado Boys Ranch Foundation
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Colorado Boys Ranch Foundation

Board of directors
as of 08/04/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Cheri Jahn

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/1/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/28/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.