COLORADO CATTLEMENS AGRICULTURAL LAND TRUST

Forever Colorado

aka CCALT   |   Arvada, CO   |  www.ccalt.org

Mission

Conserving Colorado's western heritage and working landscapes for the benefit of future generations.

Ruling year info

1996

Executive Director

Mr. Erik Glenn

Main address

8833 Ralston Rd

Arvada, CO 80002 USA

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EIN

84-1317592

NTEE code info

Farmland Preservation (K25)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Forever Colorado

CCALT is proud to announce our Forever Colorado initiative. Colorado’s clean air, pure water and healthy lifestyle depend on the conservation of our state's remaining rural lands - the wide open spaces that keep the West beautiful and provide fertile ground for local agriculture. Our goal is to raise $5 million so we can continue working with private landowners to protect Colorado's heritage and way of life forever.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

Land Trust Alliance 2014

Awards

Land Conservation Excellence Award 2001

Colorado Coalition of Land Trusts (CCLT)

Land Stewardship Award 2001

The Colorado Chapter of the Wildlife Society

Starburst Award 2006

Colorado Lottery

Julie & Spencer Penrose Award 2012

The El Pomar Foundation

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

More than 80% of Colorado's private lands are owned by farmers and ranchers, families whose commitment to stewardship runs generations deep. Carrying on this legacy so the land continues to thrive for future generations is the essence of conservation.

Colorado's population is expected to grow by more than two million people in the next 20 years, putting millions of acres at risk of development. Stewardship of our agricultural lands has never been more important, and CCALT is the only land trust in the state dedicated exclusively to conserving these working lands.

Looking ahead, CCALT will continue to serve farmers and ranchers who seek conservation easements as a pathway to protecting their land and their way of life so that protected ranches and acreage grow over the next five years. CCALT will also work to strengthen the working relationships with Colorado Cattlemen's Association and other affiliated organizations to leverage the effectiveness of our advocacy programs, and increase public awareness of key issues in land preservation.

Program Strategy: Continue to bring more ranches and acres of productive agricultural land under conservation easements. Advocate legislatively, with regulatory agencies and with the general public to build support for preserving Colorado's agricultural heritage.

1.) Act both on priority landscapes and on unexpected opportunities to bring appropriate land under conservation easements.

2.) Grow strategic alliances with public and private organizations in pursuing CCALT's long-term goals collaboratively (e.g., CCA, the agricultural community, conservation groups, government agencies, etc.).

3.) Continue to educate and increase the knowledge of landowners of the conservation tools available to them and their benefits.

4.) Develop and implement a program that informs non-ranchers and non-farmers about the value of protecting and promoting agricultural viability as well as the value and importance of land conservation.

Funding Strategy: Increase annual revenues substantially over the next five years to keep pace with service to our landowners and stewardship of anticipated increases in conserved land.

1.) Increase total revenues (by as much as 50% over the next 5 years), while balancing funding sources to ensure sustainability and long-term viability for our mission.

2.) Increase the focus on individual giving through all methods (tiered annual giving, major giving, planned giving, etc.).

3.) Develop the expertise and effectiveness of board and key staff in soliciting major gifts, with an eye to potential future capital and/or endowment campaigns.

4.) Develop and implement a comprehensive planned giving program, with support from board and staff.

Leadership Strategy: Develop board and staff resources optimally to meet the organization's needs for program delivery, fund development, governance and leadership. Capitalize on and grow the effectiveness of the board-staff partnership and the talents of other committed volunteers.

1.) Conduct regular, periodic board self-assessments from which governance plans emerge that move the organization forward in all areas of governance and leadership: reviewing and clarifying board roles, responsibilities and expectations; recruitment, orientation and training processes for new and existing members; and comprehensively assessing the effectiveness of board performance.

2.) Develop staffing plans that match strengths of current and future staff to the needs and goals of the organization, keeping overhead to a minimum.

3.) Increase the emphasis on retaining valued staff by a variety of means, including staff development opportunities that grow individual and collective bench strength.

4.) Capitalize on the talent and commitment and develop roles and responsibilities for an expanded Advisory Council to support the organization as Ambassadors for our mission and programs, as Advisors of wise counsel, and as Soliciters for funds, goods and services.

CCALT has made great strides in financial management and organizational stability in recent years. As a result of an organizational assessment and the development and implementation of a strategic plan beginning in 2006, new staff positions were created and CCALT began to thrive. The staff and board began to focus on securing stable and sustainable funding for the organization. CCALT has also significantly increased our earned income generated from successful conservation projects.

CCALT will continue to expand its individual donor base and diversify its funding sources. CCALT's goal is to maintain grant funding while increasing individual donations, implementing a major gift and planned giving program, and increasing its operational stewardship endowment funds. Growth of these funds will allow the organization to focus on its conservation work.

CCALT also plans to continue partnering with other conservation organizations in order to increase our impact and help us to reach our long-term strategic goals.

The Land Trust is also in the process of re-evaluating our strategic plan and will have even more resources and tools allocated over the next five years to address the changing needs of the organization and the conservation industry.

In its 21-year history, CCALT has developed an excellent track record of successfully completing transactions. As of June 2016, CCALT has helped hundreds of landowners statewide protect more than 465,000 acres. This is an area larger than the Rocky Mountain National Park system and the City and County of Denver combined! Several success stories can be seen on our website at www.ccalt.org.

According to the 2010 Land Trust Alliance Census, CCALT is one of the largest and most successful land trusts in the nation. Colorado is a national leader in private land conservation, ranking second in total acres protected in the United States. CCALT holds conservation easements on more acreage than any other land trust in Colorado and is ranked sixth in the nation in total acres protected by statewide or regional land trusts. CCALT Board and staff are extremely proud of our accomplishments and our success in protecting our historical agricultural working lands.

In addition to personal experience in ranching and agriculture, our Board of Directors and staff combine legal, financial, and real estate expertise with practical experience in land conservation. CCALT's volunteers and board members have played key roles in developing state laws and policies concerning conservation easements and in developing the Colorado Coalition of Land Trusts' Standards and Practices for the Stewardship of Conservation Easements. CCALT fields frequent inquiries and provides advice to land trusts across the country on the stewardship of agricultural lands.

Although this progress goes a long way toward the completion of our long-term goals, CCALT has a long road to travel before our mission and purpose can be accomplished. CCALT has learned that conservation and saving the ranching heritage of our State and our families will be key to feeding the growing population that our world will be facing over the next decade.

However, many obstacles stand in our way including economic decline (reducing the economic incentive for landowners to place easements on their properties), as well as changes in current political arenas which place agriculture lower on the State's priority list. As a result, CCALT has made adjustments to these challenges by building more partnerships and by creating strategies to further our objectives for long-term success. This is another reason why CCALT is currently undergoing the strategic planning process.

Financials

COLORADO CATTLEMENS AGRICULTURAL LAND TRUST
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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COLORADO CATTLEMENS AGRICULTURAL LAND TRUST

Board of directors
as of 4/24/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

President H. Benjamin Duke

No Affiliation

Term: 2015 - 2018

Sue Anschutz-Rodgers

No Affiliation

H. Benjamin Duke

No Affiliation

Steve Wooten

No Affiliation

Kenny Rogers

No Affiliation

Joanne Sinclaire

No Affiliation

Penny Lewis

No Affiliation

Rick Knight

No Affiliation

Terry Fankhauser

CCA Executive VP

Larry Kueter

No Affiliation

Mark Johnson

No Affiliation

John Braly

No Affiliation

Jay Fetcher

No Affiliation

Jen Livsey

No Affiliation

Koger Propst

No Affiliation

Ben Rogers

No Affiliation

Ken Mirr

No Affiliation

Sandi Turecek

No Affiliation

Chancy Love

No Affiliation

Tom Stoever

No Affiliation

Tawny Halandras

No Affiliation

Stacy Kourlis-Guillon

No Affiliation

Terry Swanson

No Affiliation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes