Adventures in Preservation

Heritage travel with purpose

aka AiP   |   Boulder, CO   |  http://www.adventuresinpreservation.org

Mission

Adventures in Preservation's mission is to connect people and preservation through enriching experiential programs that safeguard heritage and foster community sustainability. The driving force behind our work is a passion for saving the world's architectural heritage for integrated community use. AiP’s main focus is addressing the absence of sustainable economic development by supporting historic preservation. For many, historic architecture is the only resource available to create much needed economic growth through heritage tourism. Once historic buildings are destroyed, this path to revitalization is lost. AiP envisions a world where people use, understand, and appreciate historic buildings that are vital to economic and environmental sustainability and preserve cultural identity.

Ruling year info

2002

Program Director

Ms. Judith Broeker

President

Ms. Jolie Diepenhorst

Main address

3111 Broadway St

Boulder, CO 80304 USA

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Formerly known as

Heritage Conservation Network

EIN

84-1608047

NTEE code info

Other Art, Culture, Humanities Organizations/Services N.E.C. (A99)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

International Cultural Exchange (Q21)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2015.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Many project requests come to Adventures in Preservation from communities losing their battle against economic decline. Finding funding for these disenfranchised communities is very difficult. AiP’s focus is addressing the absence of sustainable economic development by supporting historic preservation. Whether in the US or abroad, historic architecture is often the only resource available to create much needed economic growth through heritage tourism. Once historic buildings are destroyed, this path to revitalization is lost. There is currently no other organization that takes on the project requests that AiP addresses. If AiP doesn’t respond, we know no one will. Our clientele does not fit within most funders’ criteria, either because structures are privately owned, the community is unable to provide matching funds, or historic structures are not grand enough to appeal to sponsors. AiP specializes in medium to small scale architecture that make up most neighborhoods.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Linking Archaeology with Preservation - Edge Hill Service Station & Fairfield Plantation

AiP's partnership with The Fairfield Foundation began in 2011 with the transformation of the 1930's Edge Hill Texaco Station into the Center for Archaeology, Preservation and Education (C.A.P.E.), a community resource center. This was an outstanding demonstration of the value of adaptive reuse. AiP volunteers donated their time during two work sessions and, combined with donated materials, provided a value in completed work of approximately $30,000.

This partnership between the archaeologists of The Fairfield Foundation and the historic preservation specialists at AiP has created great interest among volunteers and community members.

Our current project at Fairfield Plantation, near Gloucester, Virginia, began in 2013 with a very successful session filled beyond the listed capacity with 12 enthusiastic volunteers. The Fairfield Plantation manor house was built in 1694 and destroyed by fire in 1897, leaving only a substantial brick foundation and rubble-filled cellar. Volunteers work to uncover and preserve the plantation’s story, which involves the lives of five generations of the Burwell family, as well as many enslaved Africans and African-Americans, forced to labor for the Burwell’s financial success.

The goals of this project are two-fold: to provide an outstanding educational experience for volunteers in both archaeology and preservation; and to enhance visitor experience at the Fairfield Plantation by making its history clear. With more tourists visiting the site, its ability to help support a sustainable local economy is enhanced.

In 2017, Philanthropists Harry and Judy Wason have made a generous donation to the Fairfield Foundation to develop a three-dimensional model of Fairfield Plantation using innovative new technologies.

This transformational gift provides the Fairfield Foundation with a rare opportunity to utilize the latest 3D technology to digitally record, recreate, and reimagine the historic landscape at Fairfield Plantation. Documentation of the site is set to begin in August with a drone-based photogrammetry survey, which stitches together hundreds of photographs to generate a highly accurate and detailed digital model of the site. As excavations continue over the next decade, this process will help archaeologists share the thrill of discovery with the world, while also creating a detailed digital record of the site. In an unprecedented step, the Fairfield Foundation will then use 3D printers to create a highly accurate replica of the site based on the digital model.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Students

The Burgie project in northern Scotland exemplifies the impact AiP volunteer teams have. In 2017, work began on a 1912 Edwardian glasshouse/greenhouse in dire need of conservation efforts. This project supports the development of an 80-acre arboretum where research is underway to determine species that will thrive as native Scottish varieties are stressed by climate change. Without a working greenhouse, this environmentally important project is impossible.

During two weeks in June 2017, 14 volunteers repaired and restored the wood and iron framework of the main greenhouse. The group scraped, sanded, applied linseed oil to dry wood, primed and applied the first of two final coats of paint. This was accomplished with 595 hours of donated labor. During two weeks in Oct 2017, the entire greenhouse was re-glazed. 250 pieces of glass were laid in place with linseed oil putty, about a third of them custom cut to fit irregular spaces. 336 hours of labor were donated by 8 volunteers.

The population of northern Scotland will be impacted by results of arboretum research, and ultimately, impact may reach a far larger population. At market price, the estimated cost of USD40,000 was prohibitive. With AiP team members providing free labor, cost was USD5560.

Nine AiP volunteer team members returned in 2019 to take on the historic east room that is used to sprout the seeds. The main structural wooden beam was repaired, ending the fear of collapse. The roof structure was repaired and painted, followed by reglazing the entire room. This immediately provided a more supportive environment to grow seedlings for test plots.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Disaster struck in 1988 when Gyumri was devastated by the Spitak earthquake. Half the city was destroyed, 25,000 people died, 140,000 injured, 16,000 rescued from the rubble. The Soviet Union dissolved shortly after, causing supply lines to collapse and industries to close, creating rapid economic decline.

2018 marks the 30th anniversary of the earthquake, with the community’s population and economic health in decline and rebuilding skills scarce. Few organizations have invested efforts into capacity building for Armenian nationals. AiP’s hands-on example is allowing residents to envision a new way to approach their crisis.

During this project, AiP volunteers demonstrate the remarkable accomplishments possible when combining onsite training with hands-on work. Our continuing efforts reinforce new ideas generated during AiP work sessions, that self reliance and initiative can create positive change. AiP strives to involve Gyumri residents, who will not only join AiP conservation efforts, but also learn skills and make connections.

AiP began building conservation efforts in Gyumri in 2011. We continue to expand our ambitions and strive to make a greater impact on the extensive needs of Gyumri and surrounding rural communities. in 2020, AiP began supporting the Village Women's project, which encourages entrepreneurial efforts. The focus must be on changing residents’ perspective while creating jobs that provide a sustainable income.

Population(s) Served

Since 2018, Adventures in Preservation has partnered with Dunans Castle Limited, a Social Enterprise serving the Cowal Peninsula on Scotland’s west coast. Dunans is a property first seen on maps in 1590. The site now features the historic lodge, a connecting mock castle dating to 1864, and the A-listed Dunans Bridge, designed and built by Thomas Telford in 1815. Telford was one of Scotland’s greatest civil engineers and bridge builders.

This unique and dramatic baronial house was largely destroyed by fire in 2001, leaving only the pre-Victorian west wing intact. New owners with conservation and community development in mind purchased the site and formed the NGO.

The local community is both declining and aging, and Dunans is a piece of the plan to revitalize the community in this economically depressed area. Castle and grounds draw from the expanding tourist market, bringing a yearly increase in revenue of between 5-15%. Dunans currently provides jobs for 9 to 12 people, who support programs for visitors and conservation work.

AiP and Dunans Castle Limited have developed a valuable program combining hands-on training and practical experience. Experiential travelers come to Dunans and learn the skills needed to repair and restore the bridge and castle. They then complete the work. Eland Stuart, an expert in traditional building, is the onsite instructor. He is currently teaching the methods and benefits of lime mortar repointing. Project participants in 2018-2019 made great progress, as they finished work on the upper walls and one arch of the Telford Bridge.

Conservation continues in late 2021 and 2022, when the final two arches of the bridge will be repointed, and exciting work on the “castle” will begin. Once work is completed the castle will be public with event spaces on the ground floor and self-catering apartments in the upper two floors that will provide a sustainable future.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Students
Economically disadvantaged people
Students
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Global Vision Award for Culture 2014

Travel + Leisure Magazine

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. AiP's primary goal is to save the world's architectural heritage for integrated community use, thus supporting sustainable economic growth through well-managed heritage tourism.

2. AiP strives to provide quality hands-on training in building conservation skills,reinforced by on-site experience. We aim to make the training a valuable education experience for students and professionals in related fields.

3. AiP’s role is to demonstrate that maintaining historic architecture and keeping buildings in use, whether retaining their original use or planning adaptive re-use, is key to creating a vital community that is both comfortable to live in and appealing to visitors.

1. Encourage students and professionals in fields related to historic preservation to attend our project hands-on sessions by offering university credit and project completion certificates for the skills training and work experience they gain. Continue to improve our integration of academic and professional requirements into our hands-on project sessions.

2. Establish long-term partnerships with corporate interests to create financial sponsorship for each project.

3. Develop strong, active Board of Directors and Advisory Committee

4. Maintain long-term presence, 3 or more years, in each project community to assure potential funders of our ability to positively impact communities

5. Use social media marketing to increase outreach

AiP is led by a talented staff of professionals, who volunteer their time to build the organization and run the projects. Staff and Board include preservationists, architect, professor, project managers, marketing and client relations specialists working together to support AiP's progress.

The strong partnerships we build with individuals and organizations within each of our project communities greatly enhances our ability to achieve our goals. We have also built a strong network of professionals and supporters around the world that we can go to for advice and assistance.

We are beginning to establish partnerships with university programs, whose students will gain experience and receive credit attending projects and completing much needed work.

To date, Adventures in Preservation has completed 49 successful historic building conservation projects in 10 countries. In each country, we have partnered with talented community members passionate about saving their architectural heritage. We have provided hands-on skills training for volunteer teams at each location, team size varying from 3 to 15, providing a valuable experiential travel opportunity. For 19 years, we have successfully carried out our work with an all-volunteer staff of professionals.

We are now developing a strategy that will allow AiP to partner with funders and corporate sponsors to transition to a paid staff. This will greatly strengthen our ability to have a positive impact in each of our project communities.

Financials

Adventures in Preservation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Adventures in Preservation

Board of directors
as of 2/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jolie Diepenhorst

No affiliation

Term: 2017 - 2021

Judith Broeker

No affiliation

Jolie Diepenhorst

Rachel Rettaliata

Innes Borstel

Tara Cubie

Andreas Sandre

Rebekah Salem-Dalgety

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No