Archaeology Southwest

Exploring and protecting the places of our past.

Tucson, AZ   |  www.archaeologysouthwest.org

Mission

For three decades, Archaeology Southwest has practiced a holistic, conservation-based approach to exploring the places of the past. We call this Preservation Archaeology. By exploring what makes a place special, sharing this knowledge in innovative ways, and enacting flexible site protection strategies, we foster meaningful connections to the past and respectfully safeguard its irreplaceable resources.

Ruling year info

1991

Principal Officer

Dr. William Doelle

Main address

300 N Ash Alley

Tucson, AZ 85701 USA

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Formerly known as

Center for Desert Archaeology

EIN

86-0640183

NTEE code info

Anthropology, Sociology (V21)

Humanities Organizations (A70)

Land Resources Conservation (C34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In the Southwest, population is growing. People are physically closer to the places of our past than ever before. But they're not always closer to the stories those places tell. For example, 700 years ago, no more than 40,000 people lived in the greater Phoenix basin of Arizona. Today, that number is over 4.5 million. And though Phoenix might be the most dramatic example, the impact of population growth is evident across the greater Southwest. Archaeological sites are nonrenewable resources. Development has removed thousands of sites from existence. Vandalism is a serious and ongoing threat. When we lose these places, we lose important parts of our human story—forever. Archaeology Southwest works to slow, and stop, these losses, and to share the stories of the past with people of today.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Research

Archaeology Southwest follows a Preservation Archaeology focus in its research. We strive to answer big picture questions about past life in the Southwest. We employ noninvasive or low-impact research techniques, including use of existing data and collections, surface surveys, mapping, and excavation of small test units.

Population(s) Served
Adults

A key element of Archaeology Southwest's Preservation Archaeology focus is a commitment to public outreach and education. We share what we learn through our research programs with interested adults across the country through events and lectures, a content-rich website, and our flagship publication, Archaeology Southwest Magazine.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Archaeology Southwest believes that students pursuing a doctorate in anthropology should be trained in a manner that provides them with maximum flexibility in a constantly changing job market. Our program provides fellows the opportunity and funding to complete a doctoral program of original research while expanding the range of experience generally offered by academic programs by providing training in Preservation Archaeology concepts and methods.

Population(s) Served
Adults

At Archaeology Southwest, we view cultural landscapes, archaeological sites, artifact collections, and archives as nonrenewable resources. We undertake a broad range of preservation initiatives on behalf of these resources. We protect places on the land by purchasing sites, acquiring conservation easements, and working directly with landowners. We develop case-specific solutions. In collaboration with diverse partners, we take action on behalf of significant cultural sites and landscapes. By advocating for the places of our shared past, we empower others to preserve them. Protecting places means being prepared when opportunities arise. As such, we participate in priority planning workshops in which information is organized and evaluated and protection strategies are devised.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our main goals are to expand Preservation Archaeology initiatives that lead to measurable increases in the protection of cultural resources in the American Southwest, and to inspire a broader audience of people engaged with the mission of Archaeology Southwest, which is to explore and protect the places of our past.

- Use big picture research projects to answer questions about the archaeology of the human experience in the American Southwest
- Protect archaeological sites through outright landownership or the holding of conservation easements
- Continue to use our Priority Planning initiatives to guide site acquisitions
- Train other professionals in the preservation planning approach and priority planning
- Education the next generation of professional archaeologists in a preservation ethic through our Preservation Archaeology Field School
- Continue production of our award-winning quarterly publication, Archaeology Southwest Magazine
- Expand the reach of the Hands-On experiential archaeology outreach program
- Create and implement pan-Southwest databases for research and protection use
- Provide a content-rich website full of useful information on southwestern archaeology and preservation efforts
- Continue and expand public programming across the American Southwest

Our capabilities for meeting our goals are strong. We have a staff of 16 full-time employees, six of whom hold Ph.D. degrees in archaeology. Our staff has expertise in a wide variety of areas, including archaeological research, land conservation, digital media, communications, editing, marketing, graphic design, and fund development.

We are led by a committed and growing volunteer Board of Directors. We have been highly successful in our fundraising efforts. As one example, Archaeology Southwest successfully competes with large university research institutions for funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF). By the end of 2016, we had received our 14th grant from NSF, which places us in the top one-third of all so-awarded institutions in the United States.

We also have active partnerships with other organizations, including the Conservation Lands Foundation, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the University of Arizona, and Arizona State University. These types of partnerships allow us to work more effectively and accomplish more than any one organization could do on its own.

We have 783 acres of land containing archaeological resources protected through ownership or easements. We've trained 112 students in Preservation Archaeology through our annual field school. We are currently in the 34th year of our publicly-oriented Archaeology Southwest Magazine. We have supported seven PH.D. students through the Preservation Fellowship program. Our scholarship research has been published in a number of peer-reviewed publications, including American Antiquity and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

We are key members of coalitions working to protect the cultural resources in the Greater Chaco landscape of New Mexico, and within the newly established Bears Ears National Monument in Utah. We are striving to increase the protection of archaeological resources along the Great Bend of the Gila River in Arizona through the creation of a National Monument. Our website makes archaeological information accessible and useful to a worldwide audience. Looking forward we want to continue to improve our public education and outreach abilities, reach more people with our magazine, and in general, reach more people with our message of preservation.

Financials

Archaeology Southwest
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Archaeology Southwest

Board of directors
as of 10/15/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Peter Boyle


Board co-chair

Dan Kimball

William Doelle

Archaeology Southwest

Peter Boyle

retired, Vice President of Research, Kraft Foods

Donna Tang

retired, Pima Community College

Janine Hernbrode

retired, National Audubon Society

Dan Kimball

retired, National Park Service

Paul Vanderveen

Sun Health Senior Living

Mary Kay Gilliland

Central Arizona College

Michael LeBlanc

Pima County Attorney's Office

Pete Sabori

Pima County Attorney's Office

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/29/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data