PLATINUM2023

United Way of Salt Lake

Every child, every step of the way

Salt Lake City, UT   |  https://uw.org

Mission

United Way of Salt Lake envisions an inclusive community where all people can achieve their potential through access to education, financial stability, and healthy lives. We build powerful partnerships to address the inequities faced by families in our communities and seek lasting change in the systems that keep people in poverty. We work with committed partners, volunteers, investors, individuals, and donors to change the world—starting in our local communities that need it most. We are fighting to make sure that every child, and every family, in our community can be successful.

Ruling year info

1942

President and CEO

Bill Crim

Main address

257 E 200 S Ste 300

Salt Lake City, UT 84111 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

87-0227091

NTEE code info

Fund Raising Organizations That Cross Categories includes Community Funds/Trusts and Federated Giving Programs) e.g. United Way (T70)

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

Other Philanthropy, Voluntarism, and Grantmaking Foundations N.E.C. (T99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

At United Way of Salt Lake, we know charity is not enough. ​We work to change the systems that keep people in poverty by addressing the inequities ​that kids in our communities face. ​ ​Because we believe every child deserves the same chance to achieve their dreams, no ​matter their race, or the neighborhood they live in. We must work together to make it ​happen -- and that’s why we bring schools, businesses, and community leaders to the table, ​to make sure every child can succeed in life. ​ ​This is not a quick fix. Or charity for a few. ​ ​It’s preparing kindergarteners for a lifetime of learning, and helping students build confidence ​in reading and math. It’s watching high school seniors cross the stage on graduation day, ​and college graduates land their first jobs. We do this by working in schools, across communities, and at the state Capitol. Breaking ​down barriers from all sides. ​

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Utah 211

Utah 211 is Utah’s statewide health and human services referral system. It provides a simple, one-stop way for people to find resources for help with everything from housing and utility assistance to food supplies to transportation to childcare. Utah 211 also acts as a resource in the aftermath of disasters and is free and confidential. Utah 211 resources can be accessed via phone, chat, app, email, text, or website. The data from Utah 211 calls and interactions is an important tool for community partners, legislators, and residents to see the largest needs in their community and make a plan to address them.

Population(s) Served

As an organization, we are committed to changing our world by solving complex social problems at scale. We believe that this requires us to center racial equity, diversity, and inclusion in everything we do. Our Equity Roadmap provides a structured approach to identifying areas of focus and specific actions that will enable us to make significant and measurable progress in addressing inequity in our community, and we invite input from those with lived experience to help us continue our work.

Population(s) Served

UWSL is creating long-term change for half a million children and families in our community by increasing opportunities, building stronger academic programs, providing families with basic resources and housing security, addressing healthcare needs and social determinants of health (conditions in the places where people live, learn, work, and play), and designing community-wide safety nets. These are important steps in equalizing disparities in our local systems and effecting systemic changes that address the social and economic well-being of individuals.

*Early Education: Children who are kindergarten-ready are more likely to have a foundation that supports future learning and better health.
*Elementary Reading: Students who are proficient in reading in 3rd grade are more likely to graduate from high school.
*Middle School Math: Students who are proficient in math in 8th grade are more likely to graduate from college and be prepared for the workforce.
*High School Graduation: Students who graduate from high school are less likely to experience poverty, receive public assistance, or become involved in the criminal justice system.
*Post-Secondary Completion: Adults who earn 1-year certificates or 4-year degrees are more likely to be financially stable, live longer, healthier lives, and be more civically engaged.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These grants are awarded to our partners working to improve health, education, and basic needs outcomes for children and families in our community.

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These grants are awarded to our partners working to improve health, education, and basic needs outcomes for children and families in our community.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to transform the educational environment for Utah kids, eliminating disparities in education and ensuring that every child has an equal shot at success.

United Way of Salt Lake takes a "cradle-to-career" approach to improve educational outcomes for youth, aligning with partners to share, and deploy resources to improve the following outcomes:

• Early Childhood Education
• 3rd Grade Reading
• 8th Grade Math
• High School Graduation
• Postsecondary Completion
• Health and Financial Stability

United Way of Salt Lake's Promise Partnership takes a collective approach to community problem solving. To transform whole communities, we must think beyond individual programs or services and see ourselves as a united group sharing accountability for community-wide results. This is what it means to engage in rigorous collective impact.

Collective Impact requires that everyone work together in partnership – businesses, cities, government, schools, churches, foundations, and nonprofit organizations – to tackle our most pressing challenges and develop lasting solutions. By working this way, we all move towards the same clear goals.

Achieving system-wide change is a difficult undertaking, and many change efforts fail because they do not have the necessary support at every “level” with the system. For this reason, United Way of Salt Lake's Promise Partnership has built a multi-tiered structure to ensure support, leadership, and action at multiple layers within the education system.

Our partnership includes grassroots community engagement, full-service community schools, civic partnerships, outcome-focused networks, and a regional leadership table made up of leaders across the Wasatch Front. By coordinating action, communication, and influence across these layers, we believe we have the necessary ingredients to transform the educational landscape for Utah kids.

In early 2019, StriveTogether awarded UWSL's Promise Partnership its highest designation within the network, “Proof Point.” Of the sixty-eight partnerships in the network, only eleven have received this designation; and of these, the Promise Partnership is the only one to connect grassroots engagement, community schools, promise communities, outcomes-focused networks, and a regional leadership table into a coherent vehicle for social change.

To achieve Proof Point, a partnership must have 60% or more of their cradle to career outcomes trending in the right direction and must show maturity in a number of qualitative measures as well. Our recent data shows impacts in the following areas:

Kindergarten Readiness: In South Salt Lake, where a significant number of parents speak a language other than English, 70% of 0- to 5-year-old children are developmentally on track -- thanks, in part, to UWSL's grassroots initiative to engage parents of young children.

3rd Grade Reading: 3rd Grade Language Arts Proficiency has increased an average of 10.75% in Title I community schools, where UWSL works to help implement a multi-tiered strategic approach to early grade reading.

8th Grade Math: Math scores doubled from 2014-2017 for students of color at Granite Park Jr. High, with strategic alignment of resources and support from UWSL.

High School Graduation: Graduation rates at Cottonwood High School increased by 5% for all students, and 10% for English Language Learning students from 2014-2018.

Youth Development: UWSL has built strategic partnerships aimed at supporting more kids in and out of school, resulting in a 45% reduction in juvenile arrests in Kearns from 2014-2017, and a 29% reduction in juvenile arrests in South Salt Lake.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

United Way of Salt Lake
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

United Way of Salt Lake

Board of directors
as of 01/19/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kirk Aubry

Savage

Scott C. Ulbrich

Paul G. Child

Susan J. Marks

Colleen Larkin Bell

Mark Bouchard

Rebecca Chavez-Houck

Chris Christiansen

Bill Crim

Jeff Larsen

Mark Lucas

Jane Marquardt

Kathie Miller

John Milliken

Mikelle Moore

Kevin Potts

Sean Slatter

Scott Ulbrich

Tanya Vea

Todd Weiler

Michael Anglin

Jackie Biskupski

Nate Boyer

Rob Carpenter

Jennifer Danielson

Zeke Dumke

Jose Enriquez

Jorge Fierro

Scarlett Foster-Moss

Kieu Frisby

Matt Gnau

Terry Grant

Alex Guzman

Mike Kirby

Karen Kwan

Crystal Low

Matt Lyon

Benjamin McAdams

Kris Mecham

Sean Mulvihill

Christina Ortega

Michael Petrogeorge

Mike Rasmuson

Scott Sperry

Bryan Thomas

Art Turner

Heidi Walker

Tricia Warnken

Ruth Watkins

Don Sorensen

Gary B. Porter

Clint Spindler

Clint Spindler

Don C. Sorensen

Gary B. Porter

Clint Spindler

Gary B. Porter

Clint Spindler

Clint Spindler

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/12/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data