Abundant Harvest Community Garden Outreach

Planting Seeds To Grow Food And Create Opportunity For People

aka Abundant Harvest Aquaponics   |   Colorado Springs, CO   |  http://abundantharvestaquaponics.org/

Mission

Planting Seeds To Grow Food And Create Opportunity For People

Ruling year info

2011

Founder/Director

Mr Charles Hendrix

Main address

5014 Dovetail Lane

Colorado Springs, CO 80916 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

90-0622660

NTEE code info

Agricultural Programs (K20)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Abundant Harvest’s key objective is to become an effective community resource for sustainable, locally-sourced, produce and sustainable food production methods and systems. Toward this end, we have provided enrichment education, employment opportunities, and service learning since 2010. Through our creative collaborations, we’ve provided thousands of pounds of produce to needy families in our community. Abundant Harvest has distributed food through a number of organizations including Food Rescue, God’s Pantry, Common Cause, and Urban Peak. However, the need is still greater than is our harvest. Accordingly, we need to expand our efforts—particularly to achieve food production in winter—and become as efficient as practical.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Aquaponics

The vegetables and fish work together in a sustainable cycle. The fish waste provides fertilizer to the plants and the plants keep the water clean for the fish. The system also uses only a fraction of the water, energy and labor of other farming practices. Because Aquaponics is a closed-loop system, it offers communities the independence to grow their own food.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total revenue of target crop sold

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

Aquaponics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The organization is in the process of acquiring land for expansion and growth

Number of job skills training courses/workshops conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Aquaponics

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total pounds of target crop harvested

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Health

Related Program

Aquaponics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The ability to grow healthy, pesticide-free produce year round using methods other than traditional farming.

Taking portions of that produce, donating it to families in our community that cannot afford organically grown produce using community food distribution organizations to distribute the produce.

Abundant Harvest has a development plan that includes building three energy-efficient 4000 sq. ft. greenhouses that will house Aquaponics systems for growing vegetables, herbs, and fish, using up to 90% less water compared to “traditional” farming.

Our mission will continue to include the donation of 30 - 50% of harvested produce and fish to needy families in the community through charitable food distributors. The addition of three energy-efficient greenhouses and eventually an Aquaculture and Sustainability Institute will provide a space for a variety of organizations to explore approaches to creating a more equitable society that sustains rather than destroys the earth’s Eco-systems we rely on.
We have proven that the community and food-growing and distribution concepts are sound and Abundant Harvest has developed a firm foundation in the Colorado Springs area. This includes support from dozens of volunteers, students, and missionaries who both help in gardening, harvesting, food preparation, and distribution and join us in learning the craft of growing nutritious food aquaponicly.

Abundant Harvest built a prototype “hoop house” style greenhouse that grows aquaponicly to demonstrate how efficient a closed-loop technique for producing fish and vegetables can be. Although we more than doubled our food production, the model greenhouse has serious limitations. The building is poorly ventilated and insulated. Temperatures are below freezing for much of the winter and soar to 120 degrees in the summer, making the space unsuitable for growing for much of the year.

Presently, we are looking for an appropriate venue to continue our outdoor/indoor growing operations and to develop the means for raising food throughout the year while maintaining a small carbon footprint.

Abundant Harvest is a registered 501(c) 3 non-profit corporation that has developed a number of successful community garden projects in the Colorado Springs area since its founding in 2010. We have developed energy-efficient greenhouses and associated food storage, processing, and distribution systems in the Colorado Springs area that would be suitable for a wide variety of climate zones in the US and beyond. We believe that the planning and execution of the project should be a collaborative process through which the thoughts of a number of individuals will produce a clear, common vision—followed by concrete actions—for realizing this pioneering project.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Community Members

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Abundant Harvest Community Garden Outreach
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Abundant Harvest Community Garden Outreach

Board of directors
as of 4/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Charles Hendrix

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/18/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/18/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.