YWCA Pierce County

Transforming lives through safety, healing, and empowerment

Tacoma, WA   |  www.ywcapiercecounty.org

Mission

The YWCA Pierce County transforms lives through safety, healing, and empowerment.

Vision: A safe, just, and equitable community

Ruling year info

1942

CEO

Amanda Walker

Main address

405 Broadway

Tacoma, WA 98402 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-0565026

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

YWCA Pierce County is dedicated to transforming lives through safety, healing, and empowerment. As an inclusive non-profit organization, YWCA Pierce County aids survivors of domestic violence and their children throughout the healing process. All survivors are welcome regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity or expression, religion, or sexual orientation. As the largest provider of domestic violence services in our region, the YWCA serves 8,000 adults and children annually, who are seeking help due to domestic violence. Our current services can be divided into four main categories: Therapeutic Services, Support Shelter and Services, Legal Services, and Community Programs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Support Shelter

Up to 90 days of emergency housing, including basic needs and supportive services, for domestic violence victims and their children. A 24-hour crisis line for victims of domestic violence is also operated by the shelter.

Population(s) Served
Victims of crime and abuse

Provides advocacy, attorney consultation/representation, and document preparation of protection orders and other civil proceedings for survivors of domestic violence.

Population(s) Served
Victims of crime and abuse

Insights Domestic Violence Prevention and Community Education & Outreach.

Population(s) Served
Victims of crime and abuse
Children and youth

Provides project-based permanent housing with supportive services to survivors of domestic violence and their children.

Population(s) Served

The Children’s Program provides basic family support services, including respite care, resource referrals, tangible needs; family activities; curriculum-based art and recreation activities, including groups for infants and toddlers, a preschool activity group, and programming for school-aged children; and therapeutic intervention provided by a licensed therapist.

Population(s) Served
Victims of crime and abuse
Victims of crime and abuse
Children and youth

Mental health services include assessment, diagnosis, and psychotherapy for children, adults, and families focusing on trauma specific treatment and support. Our program uses both evidence-based (TF-CBT, CPT, EMDR) and trauma informed practices to support healing in families through art, play, skill building, and talk therapy. Our counselling services are offered free of charge, in line with all our other services.

Population(s) Served

Our 24-hour Crisis Hotline offers resources, safety planning, and shelter referrals to domestic violence victims and support to concerned family and friends seeking solutions for their loved ones. YWCA trained advocates counsel callers on taking safe next steps to break the cycle of violence. The Crisis Hotline number is 253-383-2593.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Victims of crime and abuse
Adults
Victims of crime and abuse
Children and youth
Adults
Victims of crime and abuse
Children and youth

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

As with many nonprofits, this year marks the beginning of a return to normal service offerings as we continue to address the needs brought on by the pandemic. Recent evidence suggests that the pandemic exacerbated domestic violence and increased the lethality of incidents. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, approximately one in three women report experiencing domestic violence during the pandemic. This reality was harsher for marginalized people with one in every two people report experiencing domestic violence during the same timeframe.

With this data in mind, we are looking to deepen and strengthen our existing programs to ensure we can continue to meet the influx of need present in our community. Internally, we are doing this by focusing on building our Racial Justice framework to reflect a restorative and healing model. We also plan to implement trauma-informed care best practices across our programs through committees developing and implementing our identified priority projects. Our external goals center around creating a strategic plan for our outreach efforts and deepening our engagement in community coalitions and partnerships. By expanding our external relationships, we will strengthen our relationship with our community and further our reach in prevention efforts.

Our services can be divided into four main categories: Therapeutic Services, Support Shelter and Services, Legal Services, and Community Programs.

Therapeutic Services is two main programs:

Children’s Program provides children 0-21 years old who have been traumatized with support to minimize the impact of trauma on development. They provide basic family support services, family activities, curriculum-based art and recreation activities, and teen dating violence support groups.

Our Child and Family Therapy Program provides mental health counseling to children/youth, adults, and families impacted by intimate partner violence.


The Support Shelter and Services include two components:

The Support Shelter provides basic needs for victims and their children (and pets) for up to 90 days. All survivors are welcome regardless of identity.

Our 24-hour Crisis Hotline is staffed by our shelter advocates and offers resources, safety planning, and shelter referrals to domestic violence victims and support to concerned family and friends.

The Legal Services program assists domestic violence survivors in need of legal advocacy and/or representation. It also offers free legal representation to clients with complex cases.

The Community Programs bring the YWCA’s mission to a diverse audience:

Our Community Advocacy center offers drop-in, on-site crisis intervention and referral services for community members experiencing domestic violence. The Insights Domestic Violence Support Groups program provides weekly facilitated psych-educational groups that offer healing and support to survivors.

Our Prevention Program educates local middle and high school students about healthy and unhealthy dating behaviors. The overall goal of the curriculum is to help youth identify and understand what makes a healthy relationship and support them in developing skills that will allow them to make healthy relationship choices.

YWCA Housing Program offers families affordable housing through a partnership with Tacoma Housing Authority while being supported by individualized case management.

After opening Washington State’s first emergency shelter for victims of domestic violence in 1976, YWCA Pierce County became a forerunner in the domestic violence service provision field.

We are the only domestic violence services provider in our county that provides: therapeutic intervention for children who have witnessed or experienced violence in their home, a safe shelter with apartment-style units where families fleeing domestic violence can bring their pet(s), programming at local schools to teach youth about healthy relationships, a support group for teens who have experienced dating abuse. Our program does this through a multi-faceted approach of offering tangible support coupled with curriculum-based and therapeutic interventions that strategically support and partner with clients. Through processing, healing from, and understanding the trauma they have experienced, our clients and their families are able to strengthen themselves as resilient, well-informed, self-determining individuals who effectively and safely navigate their lives. 

Established in Tacoma in 1906, YWCA Pierce County has devoted over a century to creating opportunity and safety for adults and children in the greater Tacoma and Pierce County community. After opening Washington State’s first emergency shelter for victims of domestic violence in 1976, YWCA became a forerunner in the domestic violence service provision field. Currently, we are the largest domestic violence services provider and emergency shelter in Pierce County.

After raising $5 million to purchase and renovate a nearby apartment building, we relocated our shelter in October 2010. The move expanded the shelter's capacity by 60% and provides each of our families with a larger, beautifully decorated, private living space that is more conducive to healing than the communal environment in our old shelter. In 2012, we began accepting male victims of domestic violence in all our programs. We are also one of the only domestic violence shelters in our area that accept pets, which removes barriers for victims who are afraid their pets will be harmed when they flee. As the need for services for teens arose, we hired a full-time staff member in 2014 to focus on serving youth ages 13-21, and our Healthy Love high school prevention program has been running for 10 years.

Over the last two years, we have worked to finish a $23 million project focused on providing extremely affordable housing in downtown Tacoma. This project, now realized and known as the Dorothy Height Apartments, expanded our therapy program space and includes 55 apartment units. Along with our shelter and main building that houses our legal and children's programs, the new building completes our domestic violence service campus.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Pierce County-Tacoma residents who have experienced domestic violence

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

YWCA Pierce County
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

YWCA Pierce County

Board of directors
as of 12/22/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Cindy Rush-Grady

Retail Wholesale Consultant

Term: 2020 - 2022

April Sage

Senior Housing Advisory Services

Dan Bogart

Banner Bank

Laura Wulf

Assistant Attorney General, State of WA

Andrea Jarmon

Industrial Insurance Appeals Judge, State of WA

Antoinett Atkins

Strategic Recruitment Initiatives

David Perry

Pierce County Sheriff (Retired)

Diana Hice

Community Volunteer

Gloria Fletcher

City of Tacoma Economic Development

Kathryn McCarthy

Tacoma Public Schools

Koree Wick

West Pierce Fire & Rescue

Liane Williams

Alco Investment Company

Correan Barker

The Evergreen State College

Diana Falco

University of Washington Tacoma

Zach Powers

Pacific Lutheran University

Meredith Neal

City of Puyallup

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/22/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/07/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.