Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle

Empowering Communities. Changing Lives.

aka Seattle Urban League or ULMS   |   Seattle, WA   |  http://www.urbanleague.org

Mission

Founded in 1929, the Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle’s mission is to empower African Americans, as well as other diverse underserved communities, to thrive by securing educational and economic opportunities.

Notes from the nonprofit

The Urban League has experienced major organizational and financial challenges over the past five years, and recently received the "Most Improved Urban League" Award from the National Urban League. We did not have a CEO for 18 months and the development of the $17.5 million Northwest African Museum/Colman School was a major strain on the organization. In mid-2012, Pamela Banks was hired as the new CEO and has made significant progress during her tenure. Major accomplishments include increasing the Board of Directors from 3 to 14 members, increasing the budget from $1 million to almost $2 million, and increasing special event revenue from $5,000 to $213,000.

Ruling year info

1947

President & CEO

Ms. Michelle Merriweather

Main address

105 14th Ave, Suite 200 Suite 200

Seattle, WA 98122 USA

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EIN

91-0575954

NTEE code info

Urban League (P22)

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Career Bridge

The Career Bridge program is designed to help individuals with multiple barriers access education, employment, and economic career pathway opportunities in order to improve their quality of life.
The goals of the Career Bridge program are to:

Create an integrated system that prepares individuals to enter the workforce
Increase access to jobs and training needed to attain good-paying jobs that provide a pathway to longer-term careers and economic opportunities
Educate individuals about opportunities in the local labor market and how they fit in today and in the future
Assist individuals to take actionable positive steps forward in their lives and at the same time give back to their community

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
Economically disadvantaged people

Safe habitable and affordable housing is a basic need. The Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle’s Housing department provides programs and resources for individuals and families seeking knowledge, understanding and access to pertinent homeownership education. Our goal – is to ensure that each and every community member has safe, sanitary, and permanent housing, no matter their economic standing.

Population(s) Served
Families
People of African descent

The Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle’s Housing department takes pride in supporting economic growth and empowerment in our community by providing low-to-moderate income individuals and families with free financial literacy and training. Our financial management education services also include information and resources that are necessary for clients to correct and/or improve their financial standing and gain financial stability.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

Whether a result of domestic violence, medical challenges, job loss or any other obstacle, when someone becomes homeless, it is a true personal crisis. With the support of United Way, Streets to Home connects individuals and their families who are experiencing homelessness to the resources they need to access permanent, safe, and sanitary housing again.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

Level Up is a culturally competent transformational program designed to provide young scholars of color with academic support, personal development assistance, financial literacy comprehension, mentorship and encouragement through self-advocacy.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People of African descent

Summer University is an intensive 6-week program between the months of July – August designed to expand professional and academic interest using a culturally relevant curriculum to stimulate learning.

Each class will consist of 75-100 students selected on a first come, first served basis. Classes will be held Monday – Friday from 9AM – 3PM.

Morning activities will alternate between

Math classes (because most students are behind in math related credits, Summer University offers 36 hours of math total);
Life skills; and,
African American history led by local community members and leaders
Afternoons will focus on topics such as:

Careers Exploration
College Readiness (admissions process, financial aid applications (FAFSA), writing college essays)
Time Management
Business Etiquette
Stress Management
Enhancing Communication Skills
Financial Coaching
Each Friday there will be a field trip conducted in collaboration with one of our Summer University partners or sponsors including the Northwest African-American Museum (NAAM), the University of Washington (UW), Microsoft, Google, and Boeing.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
Children and youth

The G.R.O.O.M. Credible Messenger Mentorship program is a transformational process in which trained community leaders from diverse backgrounds work to engage both pre and post adjudicated young adults in positive, structured and intentional relationships.

G.R.O.O.M utilizes tools such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) journaling, Motivational Interviewing (MI), community service, civic engagements and pro-social activities that help them change their attitudes, beliefs, and actions.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

Our programmatic structure creates pathways and removes barriers for participants that may be related to work, economic status, finances or personal concerns. This includes barriers range from soft skills training, to drivers re-licensing, housing and even certification training. Removing such barriers allows clients to be work ready and gives them access to new beginnings and a second chance in life.

Participants generally include those who live in economically distressed parts of the city, as these areas have a high rate of community members who are living at or below the 20% federal poverty guidelines, are unemployed, or do not have a college degree.

We recognize the lack of representation for workers of color when it comes to construction and other related industries. This is why it’s our goal to not only provide training and job access within this specific workforce but also emphasize and support women and people of color as valuable contributions to the industry.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Incarcerated people

The InfoTech Jobs Program is an accelerated training program that recruits long-term unemployed adults from the greater metropolitan Seattle area and provides them with workshops, access to job readiness tools and the opportunity to build solid adaptability skills in order to respond to a fast paced, high demand environment.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle

Board of directors
as of 08/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mrs Gina Hall

Uplift Northwest

Term: 2021 - 2023


Board co-chair

Mr Juan Cotto

Bloodworks

Term: 2021 - 2023

Kia Franklin

Equal Opportunity Schools

Walle Ralkowski

Keely Brown

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Leesa Manion

King County Prosecuting Attorney

Sasha Rabkin

Equal Opportunity Schools

Jon Bridge

Ben Bridge

Travis McPhail

Google

Oti Peprah

Microsoft

Tony Byers

Author

Juan Cotto

Bloodworks

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/19/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data