YOUTHCARE

aka YouthCare's Orion Center   |   Seattle, WA   |  https://youthcare.org

Mission

YouthCare works to end youth homelessness and to ensure that young people are valued for who they are and empowered to achieve their potential.

Ruling year info

1975

Chief Advancment Officer

Suzanne Sullivan

Main address

2500 NE 54th Street

Seattle, WA 98105 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-0917079

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

On any given night in King County, almost 1,100 young people ages 12-24 will experience homelessness. No one grows up wanting to be homeless. These young people come to YouthCare navigating circumstances beyond their control—poverty, racism, family instability, abuse, rejection; the high cost of housing and health care; underfunded systems of foster care and education. Of the homeless young people in King County, almost two-thirds are youth of color; more than one-third identify as LGBTQ; one-third have been in foster care; and over one-half are navigating the barriers of mental health, substance abuse, or physical disability. Each young person arrives at YouthCare with a unique story and set of circumstances. Our programs are tailored to each young person's individual needs and experiences, ensuring that young people experiencing homelessness can achieve long-term stability and thrive.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Outreach and Engagement Services

Outreach and engagement services offer young people a safe place to access basic necessities like clean clothing, hygiene services, and nutritious meals, while connecting with caring staff who can help them plan their next steps. YouthCare’s street outreach team engages young people living outside to help them meet their basic needs, build trust, and encourage them to access additional services through YouthCare. At our engagement centers located in Downtown Seattle, Seattle’s U-District, and South Seattle, young people can meet their basic needs with hot meals, showers, lockers, laundry, medical care, chemical dependency and mental health care, and access housing assessments, legal aid, and case management from trusted staff members.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Homeless people

YouthCare’s emergency shelter programs provide a safe alternative to sleeping outside. Our goal is to reunify young people with their families where possible and connect them to stable housing when returning home is not an option. YouthCare operates five shelter programs to get youth out of danger and into safe, supportive housing: two for youth 12-17 (the only shelters for minors experiencing homelessness in Seattle), two for young adults 18-24, and one for refugee minors.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Homeless people

YouthCare’s transitional and independent living programs focus on helping young people experiencing homelessness stabilize and build independent living skills. In program, young people access on-site case management, chemical dependency and mental health counseling, life-skills coaching, and support with education and employment goals.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Homeless people

YouthCare’s education programs are designed to help recently and currently homeless youth overcome barriers to obtaining secondary and post-secondary credentials. They combine flexible diploma- and GED-track resources with intensive case management, engagement, and housing services.

Our employment training programs provide youth with critical tools to build their futures. Youth in our employment programs are paid for their time and gain transferable skills, professional certifications, and an opportunity to learn workplace expectations. Youth develop a résumé, practice interviewing, and conduct job searches. Our employment programs encourage participants to work on educational goals and include case management support.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Homeless people

YouthCare's Bridge Continuum provides specialized services to youth and young adults who have experienced or are at risk of experiencing sexual exploitation. These specialized services include case management, emergency shelter, long-term housing, education, employment training, and access to mental health and chemical dependency counseling. Additionally, we run the Bridge Collaborative in partnership with other King County agencies, which provides 24/7 access to community advocates for youth who have experienced sexual exploitation. We also provide training to community members and consult with regional advisory committees on the issue.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Homeless people

YouthCare’s Early Intervention and Specialized Services (EISS) programming supports young people at risk of homelessness or housing instability and their families through immediate access to shelter and resources for teens in crisis, family engagement, diversion, and community-based case management programs. EISS case mangers

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Where we work

Awards

Top-Rated Nonprofit 2013

Great Nonprofits

Top-Rated Nonprofit 2012

Great Nonprofits

Top-Rated 2014

Great Nonprofits

Top-Rated 2015

Great Nonprofits

Agency Excellence Award 2013

Food Lifeline

Honoree 2016

Angels in Adoption

Grand Marshal 2017

Seattle Pride

Nonprofit of the Year 2017

Greater Seattle Business Assoc.

Affiliations & memberships

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization 2014

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization 2013

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization 2015

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization 2015

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization 2016

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Outreach and Engagement Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of young people who received emergency shelter

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2018, YouthCare's shelters moved to an enhanced model. Rather than relying on a nightly lottery, youth are now guaranteed a bed for up to 90 days, and access additional comprehensive services.

Number of clients placed in jobs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education and Employment Training

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients who obtained a secondary school diploma or GED

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education and Employment Training

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of young people served in transitional, independent living, and permanent housing programs.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Transitional Living and Community Based Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

YouthCare works to end youth homelessness and to ensure that young people are valued for who they are and empowered to achieve their potential. Founded in 1974, YouthCare was one of the first shelters to serve runaway and homeless youth on the West Coast. The goal was to help young people find safety today and build a future for tomorrow. This passionate vision—where no young person experiences homelessness, all young people can thrive, and the systems that oppress them are dismantled—drives YouthCare every day. Over four decades, YouthCare has defined best practices and developed programs that set a national standard for excellence.

YouthCare currently operates 14 sites across Seattle and serves over 1,500 young people every year. Each young person receives individualized, comprehensive care tailored to their unique needs and goals. Through comprehensive services, including outreach, prevention, shelter, housing, education, and employment training, as well as a range of community partnerships, such as legal aid, behavioral healthcare, and post-secondary support, YouthCare ensures that young people experiencing homelessness have the hope, skills, and self-confidence needed to achieve long-term stability.

YouthCare’s service are responsive to the unique needs and goals of each young person we meet. For some, quick support—a hot meal, a chat with staff, a visit to the clinic—may be all that’s needed to help them move forward. For others, the path to stability will look different. YouthCare provides individualized services—from prevention and early engagement, to education and employment training—tailored to each young person’s needs, ensuring that young people experiencing homelessness have all the resources and skills necessary to achieve long-term stability.

YouthCare’s prevention programs support youth at risk of experiencing homelessness, with the goal of heading off the life-altering trauma and danger of the streets altogether. Our outreach and engagement teams meet homeless young people where they are, providing meals, hot showers, clean clothing, first aid and hygiene items, a medical clinic, and a place to feel safe. Staff build trust with young people and help them plan their next steps. In YouthCare’s network of housing and shelter, young people build independent living skills and a stable foundation from which to pursue education and employment opportunities that lead to thriving independence. Our education programs offer flexible and individualized high school diploma and GED programs designed to help young people reconnect to school and work toward post-secondary options. Employment Programs engage youth in job-readiness and career-track trainings. Youth earn wages as they learn marketable skills, earn industry certifications, write résumés, practice interviewing, and engage in community service. Across programs, Case Managers introduce young people to key services, support them in obtaining needed documents, develop safety plans and goals, and mentor them as they move forward.

YouthCare’s 14 sites and 200+ staff serve 1,500 young people each year.

In 2018, YouthCare delivered basic needs services to over 1,100 young people and served more than 37,000 meals at our engagement centers. YouthCare provided emergency shelter to 737 clients; our community housing programs helped 82 clients; and our independent living programs assisted 84 clients. 255 youth received community-based case management services from YouthCare. Our education programs supported 93 youth; 31 students obtained their GED or high school diploma; and 51 clients entered post-secondary education. In our employment training programs, 100 young people obtained local jobs or internships; 74 youth participated in pre-employment programs; 98 young people participated in sector-based employment trainings, and 63% of sector-based employment training graduates obtained employment upon program completion.

YouthCare has been providing services to young people experiencing homelessness in Seattle/King County, WA, for 45 years. Established in 1974 as a 3-bed shelter for runaway and homeless youth, YouthCare has since grown into a 501(c)(3) organization with a $16 million annual operating budget and 14 sites serving the greater Seattle area. YouthCare added street outreach services in 1979, opened its first engagement center in 1984, began offering transitional housing in 1988, started its first employment training program in 1995, developed comprehensive education services in 2008, and launched homelessness prevention services in 2011. Our set of services for sexually exploited youth is a national model for serving this population. YouthCare's Isis at Ravenna House, a housing program responding to the needs of homeless LGBTQ youth, was the first of its kind in the western US and has been replicated in other West Coast cities. In 2017, YouthCare doubled the number of emergency shelter beds for minors ages 12-17 in Seattle with the opening of the Paul G. Allen Hope Center at YouthCare. YouthCare works to continue being a leader in the field of youth homelessness, incorporating and sharing best practices to achieve the best outcomes for young people.

Over the next three years, YouthCare’s 2019-2022 Strategic Plan will guide the agency’s work. This plan sharpens our focus, deepens our impact, and clarifies our values and practices so that we are best prepared to fulfill our mission and make a positive impact for young people. Distinct goals called out in the strategic plan to help increase long-term stability and positive outcomes for youth include: provide more individualized pathways to employability through comprehensive and diverse employment programming across all locations and programs; create more opportunities for youth to re-engage with education and improve educational outcomes; expand employment and education services into a second location to provide next-level employment and education programming; develop housing services that lead to self-sufficiency; develop a centralized, high-intensity case management program; reduce disproportionality; and leverage data to drive decision-making, program enhancements, and operational adjustments.

Everyone has the right to a place they can call home. All young people deserve a secure, stable, and healthy environment. The young people we serve are navigating a challenging set of life circumstances, including numerous systemic and institutional barriers, in their pursuit of safety, a chance to stabilize their lives, and a future full of opportunity. YouthCare’s work is hopeful and provides each young person we meet with a chance to heal, to truly thrive, and to reach their full potential.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In 2018, YouthCare approved a new strategic plan to guide our work for the next three years. This plan was developed by people at all levels of the agency—from directors, to youth workers, to the young people we serve. As first step, YouthCare adopted new mission, vision, and values, crafted in part through feedback from clients. A team of staff and board members drafted statements and sought feedback from team members and young people accessing services. Participants offered critiques on mission, vision, and value drafts through a series of in-person focus groups. The final statements reflect what young people saw as our most impactful work, and include places where youth wanted to see the agency grow. Their voice was a crucial part of developing these new statements to guide our work.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

YOUTHCARE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

YOUTHCARE

Board of directors
as of 4/20/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Karen Jones

Robert Overell

FBV Consulting

Matthew Turetsky

Turetsky ADR

Bobbe Bridge

Center for Children & Youth Justice

Mark Solomon

Seattle Police Department

Mary Lou Dickerson

Community Advocate

J.D. Kritser

Ranch Creek Partners, LLC

Carmen Hudson

Recruiting Toolbox

Alyssa Mehl Alcantara

Seneca Group

Pashtana Rahman

HomeStreet Bank

Cassie Walker Johnson

Windermere Real Estate

Stephanie Fiano

Forum Solutions LLC

Beau August

Metzler Real Estate

Richard Lazaro

Expedia Group

Francesca Peri

Starbucks Coffee Company

Ken Robertson

One Eighty/Leisure Care

Hugh Straley

Community Advocate

Marlena Torres

Children’s Home Society of Washington

Farron Curry

Schwabe, Williamson, & Wyatt

Greg Moye

Russell Investments

Heidi Dettmer

NHL Seattle

John Zmolek

Verity Credit Union

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/20/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/13/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.