BIKE WORKS SEATTLE

aka Bike Works Seattle   |   Seattle, WA   |  http://www.bikeworks.org

Mission

Bike Works promotes the bicycle as a vehicle for change to empower youth and build resilient communities. We strive to spark life-long passions for cycling and the outdoors; provide a supportive community where all youth are empowered to discover their voices, strengths and potential; and be a vehicle through which youth and adults alike can make a hands-on difference refurbishing discarded bicycles – and changing their world.

In 2017, we served over 1,700 youth ages 2 – 17 and 1,081 adults who together contributed over 10,000 volunteer hours. This year, we anticipate that 70% percent of our participants will request financial assistance to enroll in our programs, and we intend to meet 100% of that need.

Ruling year info

1997

Executive Director

Deb Salls

Main address

3715 South Hudson Street Suite 101

Seattle, WA 98118 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-1753062

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Recreational and Sporting Camps (Day, Overnight, etc.) (N20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Southeast Seattle is a vibrant kaleidoscope of diversity, with a myriad of challenges: 36% of residents in our zip code are foreign-born, including many refugees from around the world; 60+ languages are spoken in our neighborhoods; despite Seattle’s overall healthy economy, the SE region’s unemployment rate is well into double-digits; 30% of our youth are living at or below the poverty line; the area is home to many of the cities lowest performing schools; and our neighborhoods have among the highest risk for chronic illnesses, including diabetes, asthma and heart disease, and the shortest life expectancy in King County. As one of Seattle’s communities most affected by youth violence, a lack of affordable, structured out-of-school-time programs, and working parents unable to provide transportation to activities and/or outdoor supervision leaves many young people indoors and on their own after-school and in the summer.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Bicycle Recycle & Reuse Program

Our Bicycle Recycle & Reuse Program provides a means for unwanted bikes to be donated, refurbished by
volunteers and program participants, and turned into affordable, carbon-free transportation. We process over 6,000 donated bicycles every year, and strip the unusable bikes for parts before sending the remainder to be responsibly recycled through existing partnerships with waste management businesses and artists. We believe people can and want to be part of the environmental solution, but feel overwhelmed or don’t know how. We give our volunteers meaningful opportunities to make a tangible difference, while increasing their knowledge of bicycle maintenance and riding. Recognizing the importance of creating relationships across the socioeconomic, race, and age spectrum, Bike Works brings together diverse groups in a collaborative environment. Last year alone, we diverted 212,000 pounds of waste from landfills, and provided transportation to thousands of people, many who couldn’t otherwise afford a bike.

Population(s) Served

Bike Works’ youth programs are the cornerstone of our mission. Through all aspects of bicycle riding and mechanics, we provide opportunities for youth to build self-confidence and transferrable skills, develop relationships with peers from socio-economic and cultural backgrounds, explore the world, give back to their community, and be physically active. Thanks to our community's support, our youth programs offer an innovative combination of environmental education, bicycle repair and ownership, outdoor activities, and community service. Bike Works programs are rooted in the belief that young people thrive when they are valued, value themselves, and feel a sense of belonging. For example: 1) Earn-A-Bike (EAB) Programs and Drop-in Community Service. After learning basics of bicycle repair, youth refurbish bicycles donated to disadvantaged youth, and can then earn their own. Youth give over 5,000 hours of service annually and repair over 150 bikes to donate to others who cannot afford one; 2) The Community Partnership Program collaborates directly with schools and nonprofits to reach youth who may have a difficult time attending our on-site classes. Many come from families with limited resources and immigrant communities. These programs are individually tailored to the partner’s needs and provided to the participants at no cost to the students and at low-cost to the schools; 3) The Job Readiness Training program serves youth ages 15 – 18 who are often dealing with homelessness, limited resources, or other challenges at home. Throughout this intensive program, participants are mentored by highly qualified instructors. They learn both ‘hard’ mechanic and ‘soft’ employment skills, in preparation for securing employment. Job Readiness Training graduates are also encouraged to apply for paid summer apprenticeships at Bike Works; 4) Bicycle Summer Camps allow youth to be active and explore their world by bicycle, both in day camps and on bike touring trips. Many participants experience camping in the wilderness for the first time touring with Bike Works, and all of them learn leave-no-trace ethics and other ways we can protect the natural world; and, 5) Bicycle Leaders is a program for older youth that includes advanced classes and camps, mentoring, Bike Works board membership, and paid internships as ride leaders in our camps or bike mechanics in our shop.

Population(s) Served

Bike Works’ Community Programs reduce the barriers to bicycling due to cost, lack of knowledge and lack of neighborhood resources. Through these programs, Bike Works serves more than 1,000 people annually and include: 1) Bikes-For-All! increasing the number of people in our community who have access to affordable, healthy, alternative transportation through bicycle giveaways for adults with limited resources; 2) The BikeMobile, our mobile bike repair shop, visits neighborhoods where people don't have access to bike repair and cycling education services in their community. The BikeMobile services are performed by Bike Works staff and apprentices for a sliding-scale fee so that everyone has access, regardless of their ability to pay; 3) Adult volunteer, bike mechanic and riding opportunities are also available through Bike Works. Each year we provide programming for adults to help us achieve our mission by providing opportunities to volunteer, and also to increase their own riding skills in riding and bike repair; and, 4) Partnerships with local and international nonprofits puts bikes into the hands of people who need them most. Local organizations such as FareStart and Treehouse distribute bikes refurbished by our youth and adult volunteer mechanics to their clients. International organizations ship bicycles abroad that we cannot use, increasing economic opportunities and access to sustainable transportation for people in developing countries. These programs increase our environmental and social impact, and build community around bicycle recycling.

Population(s) Served

The Bike Works Bicycle Shop is an earned revenue stream for Bike Works, committed to serving Seattle with affordable bicycle sales and professional service. We’re a full-service repair shop that also sells quality used bikes and a full range of new and used bike parts and accessories. All the profits from the Bike Shop go to support our free- and sliding-scale programs.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total weight of materials recycled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Bicycle Recycle & Reuse Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Bike Works processes over 6,000 donated bicycles every year, and strips the unusable bikes for parts before sending the remainder to be responsibly recycled.

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Youth and adult participants give thousands of hours of service annually, repairing over 600 bikes to be donated to others who cannot afford one.

Number of youth who volunteer/participate in community service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Every year, Bike Works serves more and more youth with our free- and sliding-scale bicycle education programs.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Each year we provide programming for adults to help us achieve our mission by providing opportunities to volunteer, and also to increase their own riding skills in riding and bike repair.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To Bike Works, these challenges create opportunity. We are intentional in recruiting youth who most need formalized recreation and mentorship opportunities: low-income and minority youth, youth at risk for negative behaviors such as substance abuse or crime, and youth underserved by, or not attracted to, traditional sports or other after-school opportunities. We work hard to ensure our programs are welcoming and accessible to all, regardless of socioeconomic status: they are free or on a sliding scale fee and require no equipment from participants. Importantly, bicycles are a familiar site for youth from around the world; as such, they are ideal for overcoming cultural or language obstacles and bringing together youth from diverse racial, ethnic, gender, sexual-identity, age, and socioeconomic backgrounds in the joy of movement, skill-building and relationship, within a culture rooted in the belief that young people thrive when they are valued and feel a sense of belonging.

Last year Bike Works launched our 2017-2020 strategic plan with a renewed commitment to deepening our impact within the broader Southeast Seattle community. Our ‘Two Wheels – Endless Possibilities’ youth initiative will significantly expand experiential education services to minority, low-income and urban youth, including: (1) extending the age-range of young people served from our current focus on 9-17 year-olds to include programming for children as young as two; (2) partnering with new schools and organizations to provide on-site community-based programming accessible to new populations; and (3) enhancing long-term youth engagement, in part through growth of youth leadership opportunities throughout all levels of Bike Works programming.

Bike Works is led by a diverse 20-member board, including three students and members from the communities we serve. We enjoy stable executive leadership. Executive Director Deb Salls, with us since 2011, has 25+ years of nonprofit leadership expertise. Deb has led Bike Works to triple its ‘impact footprint’ over the last few years, all while simultaneously bringing in balanced budgets (we were thrilled last summer when she was named a ‘Superhero’ for Washington’s children and youth by ParentMap magazine!). Tina Bechler, Youth and Adult Program Director, has been at the helm of our programming for 15 years. They are supported by 16 full-time, and 5-15 part-time/seasonal staff, and more than 300 dedicated volunteers.

In 2017 we were excited to launch our new strategic plan, and the new “Two Wheels – Endless Possibilities” initiative. We wrapped up the year meeting or exceeding all of our goals, including:
- 1,755 youth participated in our programs, as well as 919 adults.
- Youth cycled a cumulative 4,689 miles and together with adult volunteers contributed 10,732 community service hours refurbishing bikes for donation to individuals in need while ‘earning’ one of for themselves.
- Bike Works collaborated with 92 with community partners, including schools, community centers, libraries, health clinics, corporations and small businesses, environmental organizations and more, improving access to our programs and reaching new populations.
- 100% of scholarship need was met, with 66% of youth in Bike Works’ internal programs receiving full or partial financial assistance.
- 6,059 discarded bicycles were collected, diverting 212,000 pounds from the waste stream.

Financials

BIKE WORKS SEATTLE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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BIKE WORKS SEATTLE

Board of directors
as of 09/23/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Rayburn Lewis, MD

Retired from Swedish Hospital and Medical Center


Board co-chair

Ruth Bell

Cascadia Consulting Group

Dave Farrell

Bank of America

Talina Wood

Eleven Winery

Bob Anderton

Washington Bike Law

Marcos Franco

REI

Chris Gossard

Gossard Consulting

Matt Gurney

FareStart

Matt Hendel

Microsoft

Jordan Isaacs

High School Student

Emmett Jones Toutant

College Student

Jessica Kim

Seattle Department of Transportation

Patrick McQueen

Let Media

Zoe Mitchell

High School Student

Chance Sims

Northwest School

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes