PLATINUM2023

National Coalition for Asian Pacific American Community Development

aka National CAPACD   |   Washington, DC   |  www.nationalcapacd.org

Mission

National CAPACD advances equity and creates vibrant, healthy neighborhoods by mobilizing and strengthening a powerful coalition of Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander community-based organizations working in low-income communities.

Ruling year info

2001

Executive Director

Ms. Seema Agnani

Main address

1025 Connecticut Ave NW, Suite 1017

Washington, DC 20036 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-2121566

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (S01)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (R05)

Minority Rights (R22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The fastest growing racial group in the country, growing over four times as rapidly as the total U.S. population, the AAPI community is expected to double to over 47 million by 2060. The AAPI community is one of extreme economic contrasts - the top 10 percent of Asian Americans make 10.7 times more than the bottom 10 percent. At present, over two million AAPIs live in poverty and these rates are increasing faster than the national average. Unlike most of the nation’s poverty population, however, poor AAPIs are concentrated in expensive neighborhoods: 73 percent of all AAPIs in poverty live in high cost housing markets, which places them at risk of being displaced, as cities gentrify and rents increase. National CAPACD designs our programs to tackle these disparities, improve economic mobility, prevent displacement, and preserve neighborhoods.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Housing Counseling

National CAPACD is the first and only HUD-certified AAPI-focused National Housing Counseling Intermediary in the U.S. -- with 18 members operating in 14 different MSAs. Our members provide culturally and linguistically competent housing services for renters, buyers and owners necessary to serve the quickly growing AAPI population, one-third of which is linguistically isolated. Network members collectively speak over 30 languages and are the trusted resource for information within their immigrant/refugee communities -- in some cases the only resource in their area with the language capacity to meet the asset building needs of low-income AAPIs.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
People of Asian descent

The troubling economic picture of AAPIs living in poverty motivates and informs National CAPACD’s financial capability work, which includes several interrelated approaches: our signature program, Empowerment Economics; financial coaching and access to financial products; and technical assistance. Our Empowerment Economics bases its approach on the cultural values and multigenerational relationships that inform personal finance and wealth building practices in AAPI communities. It incorporates these elements into core service methods, uplifting existing cultural practices and complex intersectional identities in defining and approaching financial security. Our financial coaching aims to increase knowledge of, access to, and utilization of mainstream financial systems for previously disenfranchised and underbanked individuals. And, our culturally competent TA helps our members to effectively integrate these financial empowerment programs into their work as well as improve the satisfaction of staff and clientele who engage with these programs.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Indigenous peoples

National CAPACD’s Small Business Program provides technical assistance, peer-learning, and resources to local programs that support small businesses to preserve AAPI neighborhoods. AAPI entrepreneurs face obstacles to establishing, growing, and sustaining their businesses. Factors include poor or no credit, access to the appropriate financial products and services, lack of education and familiarity with U.S. financial systems, and lack of access to capital. National CAPACD invests in microenterprise development as an asset building and financial inclusion strategy. Our members engage micro-entrepreneurs and others who rely on opportunities available through AAPI business districts and neighborhoods across the country. These member organizations ensure the inclusion of immigrant and refugee businesses in growing regional economies, and connect stakeholders to existing programs and resources in a culturally and linguistically appropriate way.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
People of Asian descent

Over the last two decades, we have forged strong partnerships with the country’s leading civil rights and advocacy groups. Our reputation among elected officials and federal agencies as a trusted and knowledgeable resource helps to ensure that the national discourse on equity and opportunity includes the diverse perspectives of AAPI communities. In the past year alone, we published a report on innovative community development practices to support AAPI entrepreneurship, documented the multi-generational approaches to building economic empowerment to influence the field more broadly, and launched a multilingual, online toolkit to organize against displacement in AAPI neighborhoods.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Ethnic and racial groups

#OurNeighborhoods is a network of Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) grassroots organizations committed to addressing the issue of gentrification through neighborhood organizing. We build power with low-income AAPI residents and youth who have been directly impacted by displacement.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Ethnic and racial groups

Over the past 15 years, National CAPACD’s leadership development program, CITC, has worked to support the growth of nearly 200 emerging leaders from across our membership. CITC provides opportunities to build strategic relationships with other leaders in the sector and deepens participants’ understanding of critical issues impacting AAPI communities at the federal level. Graduates from our CITC program become executive directors, get promoted to other leadership positions in their organizations, and advance key policies within federal agencies. Many continue to serve as spokespeople on issues affecting low-income AAPIs.

Population(s) Served
People of Asian descent
Indigenous peoples

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of grassroots organizations supported

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These totals reflect the total number of sub-grants to AA and PI community based organizations to support their economic empowerment, COVID-19 response or capacity building strategies.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We were established in 1999 by a group of 16 community-based organizations serving AAPI residents in cities across the country. Our founders were motivated by the profound need for a national voice that could advocate on behalf of diverse AAPI communities and analyze policies impacting low-income communities. National CAPACD has become that voice and over the past 20 years has grown into a coalition of nearly 100 community-based organizations spanning 21 states and the Pacific Islands. The members of our coalition speak more than 40 languages and reach more than one million constituents through direct and media outreach.

Through our work, National CAPACD aims to achieve three primary outcomes:

1) Strong community-based organizations that provide services to, advocate for, and organize within AAPI neighborhoods and communities.
2) A connected coalition that represents collective AAPI power at the national level.
3) National policies and resources that support and invest in local organizations and communities.

Our member organizations employ a diverse set of strategies tailored to local community needs, including housing, small business assistance, financial empowerment services, youth development, community organizing, and the creation of affordable housing and community institutions. National CAPACD offers capacity building and program initiatives to support these strategies.

As an intermediary with a proven track record, each year, we re-grant $1-$2 million to network members, implement training and leadership development programs that invest in more than 50 staff of member organizations, develop resources and tools for groups to use locally, and create peer learning opportunities for our members to share best practices and strategies across the network. In total, the members of our coalition speak more than 40 languages and collectively reach more than 1,000,000 constituents through direct and media outreach.

Over the last two decades, we have forged strong partnerships with the country’s leading civil rights and advocacy groups. Our reputation among elected officials and federal agencies as a trusted and knowledgeable resource helps to ensure that the national discourse on equity and opportunity includes the diverse perspectives of AAPI communities. In the past year alone, we published a report on innovative community development practices to support AAPI entrepreneurship, documented the multi-generational approaches to building economic empowerment to influence the field more broadly, and launched a multilingual, online toolkit to organize against displacement in AAPI neighborhoods.

In our current strategic plan, we affirm our role as an intermediary with a focus on building local organizations, while also holding a space as a national influencer. National CAPACD is currently focussed on the following strategies:

● Expand our coalition;
● Build the capacity of emerging and existing community-based organizations across the country that are reaching diverse and growing lower-income AAPI populations;
● Increase the reach of our organizing within the AAPI community;
● Develop intentional strategies to build leadership in our communities;
● Ensure that comprehensive systems are in place to support the implementation of our strategic plan, and alignment between our values and our work.

On the national level, National CAPACD will continue to strengthen our partnerships with ally organizations to defend the programs and policies that help to address structural inequities in our society. This commitment is reflected in our revised mission statement: “National CAPACD is a progressive coalition of local organizations that advocate for and organize in low-income AAPI communities and neighborhoods. We strengthen and mobilize our members to build power nationally and further our vision of economic and social justice for all.”
Our vision of economic and social justice in the US emerges when all AAPI communities, particularly low-income AAPI communities have the knowledge, resources, and capacity needed to engage, thrive and have a voice in shaping their neighborhoods and communities.

Our Theory of Change identifies three long-term outcomes:
1. Strong community-based organizations that provide services to, advocate for, and organize within AAPI neighborhoods and communities.
2. A connected coalition that represents collective AAPI power at the national level.
3. National policies and resources that support and invest in local organizations and communities.

We believe that to achieve truly healthy and thriving neighborhoods and communities, our strategy must include responsiveness to issues such as safety, security, and community autonomy, as well as sustained engagement with key partners.

Founded by a group of 16 organizations 20 years ago this year, National CAPACD has grown into a coalition of nearly 100 community-based organizations spanning 21 states and the Pacific Islands. Collectively, the coalition improves the lives of over two million AAPIs who live in poverty in the U.S. by providing voice, tools, and shared knowledge to drive change.

Our member organizations employ a diverse set of strategies tailored to local community needs, including housing, small business assistance, financial empowerment services, youth development, community organizing, and the creation of affordable housing and community institutions. National CAPACD offers capacity building and program initiatives to support these strategies.

As an intermediary with a proven track record, each year, we re-grant $1-$2 million to network members, implement training and leadership development programs that invest in more than 50 staff of member organizations, develop resources and tools for groups to use locally, and create peer learning opportunities for our members to share best practices and strategies across the network. In total, the members of our coalition speak more than 40 languages and collectively reach more than 1,000,000 constituents through direct and media outreach.

Over the last two decades, we have forged strong partnerships with the country’s leading civil rights and advocacy groups. Our reputation among elected officials and federal agencies as a trusted and knowledgeable resource helps to ensure that the national discourse on equity and opportunity includes the diverse perspectives of AAPI communities. In the past year alone, we published a report on innovative community development practices to support AAPI entrepreneurship, documented the multi-generational approaches to building economic empowerment to influence the field more broadly, and launched a multilingual, online toolkit to organize against displacement in AAPI neighborhoods.

National CAPACD has advanced its vision with positive gains for the AAPI community, including:
● In 2010, we became the first and only AAPI-focused liaison for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s housing counseling program;
● In 2012, we implemented one of the largest AAPI national civic engagement initiatives in the US;
● In 2013, we launched the first nation-wide, culturally responsive asset building program targeting low-income AAPIs;
● In 2016, National CAPACD published the #OurNeighborhoods report, and later convened a group more than 80 local organizations focused on coordinating anti-displacement strategies in low income AAPI neighborhoods;
● In 2017, we launched the Empowerment Economics model to promote a new culturally responsive and multi-generational approach toward building community wealth.

Our member organizations employ a diverse set of strategies tailored to local community needs, including housing and financial empowerment services, youth development, community organizing, and the creation of affordable housing and community institutions. National CAPACD offers capacity building and program initiatives to support these strategies. Each year, we re-grant more than $1.5 million, implement training and leadership development programs that invest in more than 50 staff of member organizations, develop resources and tools for groups to use locally, and create peer learning opportunities for our members to share best practices and strategies across the network. In total, we speak more than 40 languages and reach more than one million constituents through direct and media outreach strategies.

In addition, over the years, we have forged strong partnerships with the country’s leading civil rights and advocacy groups. We have built a strong reputation with elected officials and federal agencies in Washington, DC to ensure that the national discourse on AAPIs includes the diverse voices of our communities. In the past year alone, we have published a report on the thriving small business sector in the AAPI community and documented the multi-generational approaches to building economic empowerment to influence the field more broadly.
National CAPACD is the only national AAPI-focused organization working at the intersection of race and economic justice. Building on the foundation of our current strategic plan, we recently clarified that our strategic identity must respond to the most urgent threat low-income AAPIs face in our neighborhoods – displacement.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.)

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

National Coalition for Asian Pacific American Community Development
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

National Coalition for Asian Pacific American Community Development

Board of directors
as of 11/09/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Rachelle Arizmendi

Avenu Insights & Analytics

Term: 2020 - 2023


Board co-chair

Ms. Angie Liou

Asian Community Development Corporation

Term: 2021 - 2024

‘Alisi Tulua

UCLA Center for Health Policy Research

Trina Villanueva

Sillicon Valley Bank

Rachelle Arizmendi

Avenu Insights & Analytics

Duncan Hwang

APANO​ & APANO Communities United Fund

Ekta Prakash

CAPI USA

Angie Liou

Asian Community Development Corporation

Chhaya Chhoum

Mekong

Inhe Choi

HANA Center

Laura Choi

Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

Wayne Ho

Chinese American Planning Council

Chi-mei Lin

Chinese Community Center

Malcolm Yeung

Chinese Community Development Center

Erich Nakano

Little Tokyo Service Center

Maiko Winkler-Chin

SCIPDA

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/24/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian/Asian American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability