Philanthropy, Voluntarism, and Grantmaking

The Prem Rawat Foundation

  • Los Angeles, CA
  • www.tprf.org

Mission Statement

The Mission of The Prem Rawat Foundation is to address the fundamental human needs of food, water and peace. Through a variety of programs and initiatives, TPRF is dedicated to helping build a world at peace, one person at a time, so that people can live with dignity, peace, and prosperity.

Main Programs

  1. Food for People
  2. Peace Education Program
  3. Public Events and Forums
  4. Disaster Relief
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, South America.

ruling year

2002

Principal Officer

Self-reported

Linda Pascotto

Keywords

Self-reported

peace, disaster relief, food, water, eye care

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Also Known As

TPRF

EIN

91-2166236

 Number

5954583926

Physical Address

1223 Wilshire Blvd. #464

Santa Monica, CA 90403

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (W12)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

TPRF's Food for People program in 3 poverty-stricken communities (one in India, one in Nepal), and one in Ghana has had a remarkable effect in increasing school attendance and success, improving health, and stimulating the economy.

TPRF's Peace Education Program (PEP) provides a curriculum to help people discover their own inner resources. Translated into 27 languages, PEP has been presented in 73 countries to a total of over 26,000 people since 2012 and continues to grow rapidly.

TPRF's forums bring leaders together to explore the relationship between individual peace and world peace.

TPRF often provides disaster relief for victims who are not being adequately aided by governments or larger NGOs.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Food for People

Food for People (FFP) is a food-aid program designed to help rural communities emerge from the downward cycle of poverty. Currently, three facilities are in operation: one that opened in 2006 in Bantoli, India; one that opened in 2009 in the Dhading District of Nepal; and one that opened in 2012 in Otinibi, Ghana. By the end of 2016, the FFP program was providing close to 400,000 meals a year to children and ailing adults with the objective of enabling children to go to school and malnourished adults to gain strength needed to return to work. In all three areas, school enrollment has at least doubled, and for the first time, village students in Nepal and India are completing grade 10 and passing the School Leaving Exams to go on to higher education. In Otinibi, the entire 10th grade passed the School Leaving Exam in 2016.

Category

Food, Agriculture & Nutrition

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Budget

$310,000.00

Program 2

Peace Education Program

Peace Education Program

Category

Crime & Legal

Population(s) Served

Offenders/Ex-offenders

Budget

$160,000.00

Program 3

Public Events and Forums

TPRF sponsored 12 public sponsored events in North America.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

None

None

Budget

$170,000.00

Program 4

Disaster Relief

TPRF regularly provides disaster relief in partnership with other nonprofit organizations, especially addressing underserved areas. In addition, TPRF continues to fund eye clinics in rural areas of India and Nepal that provide eye exams, eye infection medications, and corrective lenses at no charge to people who could not otherwise afford them. Recent grants aided people in Nepal following the 7.8 earthquake in 2015, in Ecuador following the 7.8 earthquake in 2016, as well as flood relief in Fiji, and earthquake relief in Haiti.

Category

Public Safety, Disaster Services

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$200,000

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    TPRF has two main focuses: The Foundation's primary purpose is to promote world peace by helping individuals find personal peace in their lives. The Foundation pursues that goal by sponsoring forums for leaders of governments, industry, education, and other sectors of society to explore the possibility of peace, and also through its Peace Education Program (PEP), developed in 2012. PEP is a curriculum for discovering personal peace designed for use in a wide variety of settings: colleges, adult education, community groups, veterans groups, hospice and hospital staff, prisons, rehab centers, senior centers, etc. In the next 3 to 5 years, TPRF plans to expand the PEP program from over 185 active workshops serving 9,000 people to 500 active courses serving 25,000 people.

    TPRF's second purpose is to develop model programs for people caught in a downward cycle of poverty that provide a means for them to shift out of that cycle and build a different future for their children and grandchildren. To this end the Foundation has developed the Food for People program (FFP), now operational in Bantoli, India; Tasarpu, Nepal; and Otinibi, Ghana. Currently TPRF is researching a location for a fourth facility and increasing the number of children served by the Nepal facility. The Foundation is also aiming to document the success of the three current programs so that other organizations or governments can use the FFP model as a basis for increasing health, literacy, and prosperity in impoverished communities.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    FOOD FOR PEOPLE (FFP): TPRF is in the research stage of selecting a location for a fourth FFP program and is planning to increase the number of people being served in the three current programs. In Nepal, the facility is offered to students preparing for their tenth grade School Leaving Exams as a place to study in the evenings. Dinner and tutoring help is provided, making it possible for the students of this area to pass their exams with rates exceeding the national average. The plan is to continue developing programs that help the students, train adults in marketable skills, and provide eye clinics for the surrounding communities (Nepal and India).

    PEACE EDUCATION PROGRAM (PEP): TPRF is increasing its volunteer staff to meet the growing demand for the program in new areas, continue translation into new languages, and develop better systems for reporting results. Training in the PEP course facilitation will be offered to staff at prisons requesting to have the program to run throughout their population for inmates, guards, and others.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    One of TPRF's greatest assets is that, although it is based in Los Angeles, it enjoys a broad international support base of both donors and volunteers. TPRF's virtual office brings the management team close together regardless of where they live. Among the volunteers are a large number of experienced men and women who have made available considerable time to help with the management of the Foundation and implementation of its programs. As new volunteer needs arise, role descriptions are created, and qualified people respond with the offer of their time and talent. Managers make the selection much as would be done for new hires. The atmosphere of teamwork and valuing each person's contribution makes volunteering for the Foundation enjoyable as well as challenging. These factors lead to efficiency, not just because of low overhead, but because non-competitive teamwork is very effective.

    TPRF's Food for People program in Bantoli, India is now completely self-supporting and partially so in Nepal. All staff is local to the region of each facility, in line with the Foundation's intention to build facilities and work with communities and countries to make them self-sufficient.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Peace Forums are beginning to stimulate a deeper commitment to personal peace in leaders of government, industry, and community organizations. Indications are that participants in peace forums are making an effort to seek out ways to apply principles of personal peace to themselves and their communities.

    In Brussels, Belgium, scores of people in leadership positions signed a pledge for peace, a commitment to do something tangible for peace in 2012 and beyond. Their actions that continue to this day will be an indicator of success. As a result of the forum in Ibarra, Ecuador (2013), teachers and school administrators are considering possible use of the Peace Education Program in the district curriculum.

    The rapidly increasing demand for the Peace Education Program (PEP) is a significant measure of success in itself as is the interest in national Departments of Corrections in bringing the program into their entire system. While it is impossible to follow the long-term success of PEP with individual participants, it is possible to evaluate the effect of the course on inmate behavior during incarceration. For evaluating success of PEP outside of such controlled environments, there are two main measures: the comments of participants during and after the course and the spread of the program through word of mouth. In some areas significant changes seem to be taking place. For instance, certain gang members in the Ibarra area of Ecuador, who have been exposed to PEP, have changed their views on violence and are promoting peace instead. Situations like this will be followed to determine the longer-term effect of the program on such individuals and groups.

    The Food for People (FFP) program is demonstrating measurable changes in the health and in educational success of participants. There have already been significant increases in school enrollment and attendance in each area served by a FFP facility. There are measurable improvements in community life, such as an increase in agricultural production, improvement in community health, and signs of emergence from poverty. These improvements are significant signs of the success of the model program.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    With the first Food for People facility opening in 2006, the second in 2009, and the third in 2012, it has already become clear that the program has both an immediate and a growing influence on the communities they serve. As time goes on, students in local schools begin to perform better and show interest in going on to higher levels of education. Students begin to think in terms of careers beyond hard labor for survival. Understanding of the importance of hygiene spreads from the children to their families, and incidence of disease is beginning to decrease. The importance of close cooperation with each community has been reinforced over the years of experience. Increased community involvement is beginning to stimulate support, both in money and in-kind services, from the local area.

    The goal of self-sufficiency has already begun. It has been achieved in India and is progressing in Nepal. We now have a formula for success for these facilities, including management, community involvement, and health standards. This proven process will allow TPRF, in time, to hand over the operations and support of these facilities to the local communities, while maintaining oversight. As current facilities are fully funded and managed locally, TPRF will be in the position to start new ones.

    Each new FFP program incurs a significant start-up cost for building and equipping the facility. TPRF needs to increase its development team in order to seek grants to make expansion possible. One such grant was received in 2013, but more are needed and three more are under consideration.

    The success of the Peace Education Program has led to increasing demand for more materials for a growing number of people who have completed the 10-week course. This involves creating 10 more multimedia workshops as well as printed material for the entire curriculum. For this and for ongoing translation, additional funding will be needed.
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, South America.

Social Media

Funding Needs

$260,000 to fund the Peace Education Program $250,000 to fund the Food for People Program

Accreditations

Charity Navigator

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance

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External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

THE PREM RAWAT FOUNDATION
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

The Prem Rawat Foundation

Leadership

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Principal Officer

Linda Pascotto

BIO

Born in San Mateo, California, Mrs. Pascotto attended Girls' Collegiate High School in Claremont, California, where she graduated with honors. She continued her education at the University of Denver, where she received a degree in political science.

Mrs. Pascotto has had a lifelong interest in philanthropy and supports directly and through her private foundation many charitable organizations that promote specific cultural, social, and educational work.

Married with two grown sons, Mrs. Pascotto lives in Zephyr Cove, Lake Tahoe, Nevada and has taken an active interest in several organizations in that area including Barton Memorial Hospital, Lake Tahoe Community College, and both the Reno public broadcasting station and the Reno public radio station.

Mrs. Pascotto travels throughout the world in pursuit of her primary passion of supporting and participating in activities involving Prem Rawat and TPRF.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Linda Pascotto

The Linda and Alvaro Pascotto Charitable Foundation

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?