FAIRBANKS COMMUNITY FOOD BANK SERVICE INC

Freely given food given freely

aka Food Bank   |   Fairbanks, AK   |  www.fairbanksfoodbank.org

Mission

The primary purpose of the Fairbanks Community Food Bank Service, Inc. is to provide food for hungry people and to distribute surplus food that would ordinarily be discarded. All locally collected food is to be distributed without charge.

Notes from the nonprofit

The Fairbanks Community Food Bank is so grateful for nearly 40 years of support of this agency. We still receive free food and give it away free. It may not be the best business plan but we are thankful the plan has allowed us to serve Interior Alaska (urban and rural) -- through fires, floods, earthquakes, 9/11 and COVID-19. Your support makes that possible. It is amazing!

Ruling year info

1983

CEO

Mrs. Anne Weaver

Main address

725 26th Ave Ste 1

Fairbanks, AK 99701 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

92-0088266

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Collecting local surplus food and distributing it to people in need.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Fairbanks Community Food Bank Service Inc.

Last year we provided food boxes, through approximately 100 distribution sites, to over 33,000 different people in Interior Alaska. 50% of those people are local children. We also distribute two USDA programs; TEFAP and CSFP. Both are federal income guidelines programs.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

We collect local surplus food and distribute it, through 100+ agencies, to the members of the community that need it.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Two USDA programs serve Interior and Northern Alaska. CSFP serves elders over 60 years old who are income qualified and TEFAP serves those who are federally income qualified.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

During the summer we know many of our children do not have sufficient food in their households, because school is out. The Fairbanks Community Food Bank requests certain types of food (kid-friendly) from our community and stores that food for groups in our community who volunteer to pack sacks which fit into backpacks. Once a week, in five locations, the food is distributed by volunteers to those children who enroll in the program. Last year we served over 300 children once a week with this supplemental food.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

This program is for medically referred patients. It provides each referred patient with 6 pounds of fresh food (produce) each day/5 days each week. We are currently serving about 500 patients.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses

Where we work

Awards

Green Star Certified 2010

Green Star

Sharp Award 2010

OSHA

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Fairbanks Community Food Bank Warehouse

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of pounds of food collected per year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Fairbanks Community Food Bank Warehouse

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of pounds of food distributed in food boxes each year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Fairbanks Community Food Bank Warehouse

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

On average, about 2/3rds of all food collected each year goes into our daily food boxes.

Number of pounds of food distributed to other agencies in Interior and Northern Alaska each year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Fairbanks Community Food Bank Warehouse

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

On average, about 1/3 of food collected each year goes into the pantries of other 501C3 organizations

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Fairbanks Community Food Bank Warehouse

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

During COVID, our senior volunteers self-quarantined, so we did more work with fewer volunteers

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

REDUCE food waste by recycling local surplus food in this community and in our landfills by at least 1,500,000 pounds annually

MAINTAIN and sustain the food requests for individuals and families in need by providing at least 600,000 requested meals

INCREASE the capacity of other agencies in Interior Alaska who serve the at risk population by adding at least 1,000,000 pounds of food freely given to local 501C3 agencies

MAINTAIN volunteers as the primary labor source for this organization by at least 13,200 donated hours each year

MAINTAIN community financial support of this agency. Our goal is to have at least 70% for the Fairbanks Community Food Bank income from individual and corporate donors.

At the Fairbanks Community Food Bank there is a balance of FOOD IN and FOOD OUT, but we are well positioned to respond to an area emergency or other change in the community's food assurance needs. In FY 2019 the demand for Food Bank services exceeded our capacity, but we met those demands, distributing food 6 days each week, even during the COVID period. Employees and volunteers served more meals than our goal and took in more food than our baseline. Consistent with our vision and proven track record, when called upon, this local Fairbanks Community Food Bank surpasses all goals, as required, to effectively meet community needs, COVID 19 and its' variants have proven that we have the ability to meet community demands, even in extreme situations. We are able to do this because we are a COMMUNITY food bank, with members of our community who really care about NEIGHBORS HELPING NEIGHBORS.

We are expanding the working capacity of this Food Bank operation, but not making substantial program changes. We just need more space and that is under construction in 2022, We will focus on and effectively serve our target population, primarily using volunteer labor and donated food. This is a crucial strategy as Alaska is suffering through a statewide fiscal crisis, and we are serving more people with food needs, but those same people are our donors, too, so there could be a loss of donor revenue.

We have "developed" our communities to understand that we CAN share and take care of one another, as the needs arise. We believe our huge volunteer and donor base will be essential in keeping community eyes on the problems Alaska's economy is causing. We have been strategic in working with corporations and local business, so that when people want to "give back" we have a good reputation as an efficient and team building project. We have used good business practices to remain sustainable. Reputation, reputation, reputation is our sustainability plan.

When we began 40 years ago we had nothing but an idea. We are now operating nearly 50,000 sq ft of warehouse and office space which provides food assistance to Interior and Northern Alaska, and are adding on a new warehouse which will be an additional 16,000 sf. We receive free food and give it away free, so that is an accomplishment. The various building projects are donated, built to our specifications, so we are mortgage free. We have 17% of our income, in our warehouse facility, as earned income (rental space). Three-fourths of all that we need to operate this food bank is donated, in-kind, volunteer labor. One-fourth of what we need is cash to keep our doors open and is provided primarily by individual donors and fundraisers.

One project that we are still working on is increasing our freezer space in order to accommodate incidental caught (by catch) fish, and that will be part of our new warehouse facility which is under construction. Example, last year there was a fishery in Dutch Harbor, salmon which was "incidentally" caught in that fishery was sent to Seattle for processing and then returned to Alaska. We were able to obtain 2-40 ft van loads of fish sticks and salmon patties to use in our program. Now that the politics of salmon caught in the wrong season has some solutions, we are able to salvage much of that highly desirable protein to use in our food box program. Now we need to build more freezer space to accommodate this gift.

We also started, in 2019, a new FOOD IS MEDICINE program for those who are over 60 years old, enrolled in the CSFP food program and/or are medically referred. Each enrolled person is eligible to pick up (customer choice) 30 pounds of fresh fruit and veggies each week. We seek secure long term funding for this program. We have about 900 patients who have been served in this program, even during the COVID period.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Anyone in Interior Alaska who has a food security issue.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In 40 years we have made basic food boxes, with the food which was donated to us. Many people requested specific types of food, especially for their medical needs. Diabetics, Heart Patients, Cancer patients, etc. need to have special diets, but our workforce who pack food boxes may not have any idea what a patient may require in those food boxes. In January 2019 this food bank created a special program of FRESH fruits and veggies only for patients who are medically referred into the FOOD IS MEDICINE program. The food is "customer choice" for those who are referred, and it is open daily from 11 am to 3 pm. Each enrollee is able to take 6 pounds of fresh food each day, up to a maximum of 30 pounds each week.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    In all our programs, we want to provide the healthy, nourishing types of food they are accustomed to eating and which provide the best nutrition. We welcome all comments about the food we provide in each program.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

FAIRBANKS COMMUNITY FOOD BANK SERVICE INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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FAIRBANKS COMMUNITY FOOD BANK SERVICE INC

Board of directors
as of 03/07/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Gene Theriault

State of Alaska, retired

Term: 2020 - 2022

Hollis Hall

Alaska Cooperative Extension Service

Michael Walsh

Foraker Group

Genevieve Bell

Flowline, Inc.

Uriah Nalikak

Petro Star

Patty Walter

Diocese of Alaska

Gene Therriault

Alaska Energy Issues

Ron Wall

Alaska State Troopers

Trevor Hanson

Odem Corp.

Ray Bronson

Kinross-Ft. Knox

Bob Hajdukovich

Retired, Aviator

Nancy Hanson

Retired, Catholic Schools of Fairbanks

Chad Hutchison

UA Director of State Relations

Marisa Sharrah

Hospital Foundation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/7/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/04/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.