Animal related

Heartland Humane Society

Commitment to Compassion

aka HHS   |   Corvallis, OR   |  www.heartlandhumane.org

Mission

Our Mission: To build a more compassionate community by teaching humane messages to our youth, caring for homeless animals and strengthening the human-animal bond.

Ruling year info

1973

Executive Director

Ms. Andrea Thornberry

Main address

398 SW Twin Oaks Circle

Corvallis, OR 97333 USA

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Formerly known as

Benton County Humane Society

EIN

93-0574297

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

VISION:
To carry out our humane commitment to the animals of Benton County by operating an open-door shelter and caring for homeless animals; providing education and enrichment programs to promote healthy human-animal bonds; offering access to low-cost services to those in need, with an emphasis on population control; developing progressive outreach programs; setting a high standard of animal care and husbandry; supporting opportunities for clinical education; and enhancing our funding resources to continue expanding these efforts.
HISTORY:
- The Surgery Suite was the first in Oregon to be inside a shelter. However, we are not able to serve publicly owned animals.
- Heartland has successful humane education programs, after school, in summer, in classrooms. Yet, there is no dedicated space or the opportunity for new programs.
- The Shelter can accommodate roughly 80 cats and utilizes over 100 fosters to expand the capacity. But, the kennels are not up to modern standards.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adoption Services for Homeless Animals

Animal Care Programs
Heartland cares for all stray, seized, or surrendered animals in Benton County. We work to find new homes or appropriate placement.
Heartland staff members and volunteers work hard to ensure our animals are healthy and happy. We use the Open Paw program to reduce the stress for dogs while they are in the kennels and provides basic training. Open Paw engages volunteers, staff, and even the visiting public.

Our cat population benefits from the Meet Your Match program. By identifying the different personality traits of adoptable cats, and matching them with the traits adopters want, we can successfully increase adoptions and reduce returns.

Foster Care Saves More Lives
Foster Care gives animals a second chance. Foster homes care for animals that are too young or too ill to stay at the shelter. With generous support from community members who open their homes to these animals, HHS expands the walls of the shelter, serving more animals than the facility could do alone. Last year, 689 animals went into Foster Care.

The Safe Housing Program utilizes the Foster Care network to care for pets whose families are seeking emergency assistance from the Center Against Rape and Domestic Violence (CARDV), inclement weather shelters, Community Outreach Inc. (COI), and the Mario Pastega House. This year, we helped 26 animals in this program.
689 animals were cared for by foster volunteers.
155 current foster volunteers.

Preventing Unwanted Pets
Heartland Humane Society provides life-saving medical treatment for animals, as well as important spay/neuter services to address pet overpopulation in the community.
1,125 surgeries were performed in the clinic last year.

Transfer Partnerships
Heartland works with many shelters throughout the region to save animal lives. When we have space we will transfer animals in from shelters with higher density populations and from shelters who lack necessary resources to adequately serve a particular animal. These transfers are at our discretion so we can always fulfill our commitment to our service area of Benton County. Most of these transfers are Linn County Dog Control, Lincoln County Animal Services Shelter, Luv-a-Bull and Luv-a-Little, Feral Night Cat Rescue, and dogs from the START program which serves many municipal shelters in California.

We also work with many shelters and rescues to place our animals to broaden their chance for a new home. Transferring to placement partners reduces the population of animals at Heartland and gives more animals a better chance for new families. Some of the groups we work with include Senior Dog Rescue of Oregon, Pet Adoption Network, Cat Adoption Team, Oregon Humane Society, Luv-a-Bull, and various breed-specific rescues.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified

Every year we visit all of our local elementary schools sowing the seeds of compassion by teaching responsible pet ownership and safety around animals. Every month, through the support of local businesses and the Corvallis Gazette Times, we publish a pet-care page in our local paper. Every day we have volunteers in our shelter. Many of them range in age between 8 and 15 years. While they are here they volunteer side-by-side with a family member. Together they learn the joy of giving and helping others in need.

Humane Education - Classroom Presentations
Heartland Humane Society’s humane education program instills values and facilitates character development through age appropriate lessons regarding responsible pet ownership, as well as respect and compassion towards animals and people. Our lessons about humane treatment of animals helps schools meet "Instructions in Ethics and Morality” under ORS Statue 336.067.
Each topic has a length of 30 minutes.

Kindness Kids Club
Kindness Kids' Club is a volunteer program for youth ages 8 years to 15 years. During program hours, Heartland Staff supervise the youth volunteers while they help with afternoon tasks and special projects around the shelter. The youth volunteers learn how to care and work with animals around the shelter all while building leadership skills and compassion.

Camp Catnip
During Camp Catnip, youth enjoy a week filled of active learning with age appropriate curriculum all while working hands on with the animals at Heartland Humane Society. Camp Catnip focuses on building leadership skills in youth as well as educating them in fun ways on important animal related topics - Responsible Pet Care, Animal Safety & Bite Prevention, Careers with Animals, and Open Paw Dog Training. A Camp Catnip T-shirt is included. Limited scholarships available through Heartland Humane Society.

Other Humane Education Activities
Youth Tours
Birthday Parties
Poster Contest
Heartland Heroes

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
General/Unspecified

It is an unfortunate fact that domestic violence and animal abuse often coincide. Sometimes, these occur simultaneously and in some instances the animal abuse is the method of spousal control and violence. As difficult as it is for a person to leave a violent relationship and enter a shelter, the decision can be made more painful when a beloved pet is left behind. Some people will choose to stay with the abuser and the pet rather than seek necessary shelter.

Similarly, people who have lost their homes may choose to stay in a car or on the streets because they are unable to keep their pets otherwise. At the Mario Pastega House, some people have declined their services and delayed medical treatment because they did not have care for their pets. Others drove hours each day to continue caring for their pets.

The Emergency and Safe Housing Program serves clients of the Center Against Rape and Domestic Violence (CARDV), inclement weather shelters, Community Outreach Inc. (COI), the Mario Pastega House and the American Red Cross.

Owners sign a contract with Heartland so their pets can be cared for and receive necessary vaccinations and veterinary care while the owner receives services from partner programs. Owners can visit their pets daily and when they are back on their feet the pet is returned to them. The typical term of service through this program is one month.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Where we work

Awards

Non-Profit of the Year Nominee 2014

Celebrate Corvallis

Affiliations & memberships

American Humane Association 2011

Chamber of Commerce

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rehomed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified

Related Program

Adoption Services for Homeless Animals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Numbers are based on fiscal year and include adoptions, return to owners, and transfers to partner organizations.

Number of animals euthanized

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified

Related Program

Adoption Services for Homeless Animals

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Numbers are based on fiscal year. Euthanasia includes owner requests. We take all animals in Benton Country regardless of health, behavior, or adoptability. We do not euthanize due to space.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified

Related Program

Adoption Services for Homeless Animals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Numbers are based on fiscal year

Number of sheltered animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified

Related Program

Adoption Services for Homeless Animals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Numbers are based on fiscal year. These are the total number of animals received.

Average number of days of shelter stay for animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified

Related Program

Adoption Services for Homeless Animals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Numbers based on fiscal year. Includes cats, dogs, and small animals.

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Related Program

Humane Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Numbers based on fiscal year. Includes participants in Camp Catnip, Kindness Club, classroom presentations, shelter tours, and youth volunteers.

Number of animals served in Safe Housing Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related Program

Safe Housing Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Numbers are based on fiscal year.

Save rate

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified

Related Program

Adoption Services for Homeless Animals

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Percentages are based on fiscal year.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Improved animal care: Remodeling our operating suite and enhancing the functionality of our facility, including adding building amenities the community has long requested, will allow us to better care for the animals we serve.<br/><br/>Fewer unwanted animals: Our new facilities will allow us to increase our spay/neuter services, leading to a reduction in the number of unwanted animals in our community. <br/><br/>More adoptions: Enhancements to our facility will improve the animal adoption process and lead to an increase in the number of adoptions, which now average about three per day.<br/><br/>A better environment for animals in our community!

- Renovate current spay & neuter surgery suite to allow for low-cost spay & neuter services for the public. Currently there is no ability to serve public animals.<br/>- Add a larger community education space with a multi-purpose community room, flooring appropriate for dog training and space for interactive youth programs.<br/>- Reconfigure cattery to modern standards and provide more space to serve more cats.<br/>- Create additional adoption rooms so prospective adopters can meet shelter animals.<br/>- Add an animal behavior/assessment area.<br/>- Removal of old house on adjacent property, owned by Heartland, to increase parking and access to the shelter.

Heartland is the only facility-based animal welfare organization in Benton County. We have a strong network of volunteers, friends, placement partners, and adopters. We believe there is strong support in the community for a low-cost spay/neuter clinic. We work regularly with local veterinarians and we have two certified veterinary technicians on staff. Currently, we operate a clinic for in-house animals and local groups and rescues. We hope to expand our current activities to the public.

Increase in adoptions<br/>Decrease in euthanasia of animals in the shelter<br/>Decrease of "free" animals in the paper and on Craig's List

A task force was formed in the winter of 2012 and completed their report June, 2013. Staff can begin to implement some of the directives (adoption specials, foster partnerships, etc.) and a new committee formed to plan capital improvements needed for a spay/neuter clinic. We have architectural drawings, have engaged a local builder, are acquiring necessary permits, and have secured 30% of our financial goal.

Financials

Heartland Humane Society
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Heartland Humane Society

Board of directors
as of 1/14/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Tim Hazzard

Veterinarian

Term: 2018 - 2019

Kady Ellifritz

SIGA Technologies, Inc.

Kathleen Fowler

No Affiliation

Diana Thompson

LuAn Carone-Rhodes

Running Princess

Michelle Klampe

Oregon State University

Giovanna Rosenlicht

Eastgate Veterinary Clinic

Tracy Speelhoffer

Oregon State University

Lisa Bilgen

Colonial Life

Diane Cygan

Witt Consulting

Arnold Rollin

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Keywords

Animal Welfare and Protection, Humane Education