PLATINUM2022

Disability Rights Oregon

Equality. Opportunity. Independence.

aka Disability Rights Oregon   |   Portland, OR   |  www.droregon.org

Mission

Promote and defend the rights of individuals with disabilities. We envision a society in which persons with disabilities have equality of opportunity, full participation and the ability to exercise meaningful choice.

Ruling year info

1977

Executive Director & CEO

Jake Cornett

Main address

511 SW 10th Avenue, Suite 200

Portland, OR 97205 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

OREGON ADVOCACY CENTER

EIN

93-0686170

NTEE code info

Disabled Persons' Rights (R23)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (P01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (L01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Disability Rights Oregon works to create a society in which persons with disabilities have equality of opportunity, full participation, and the ability to exercise meaningful choice.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Children's Rights Project

Advocacy for children with disabilities and their families related to early intervention, special education, foster care, physically restraining children in public school, and the impact of the criminal justice system of children of color and children with disabilities that fuels the school to
prison pipeline.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with disabilities

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of policies formally introduced

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Work with legislators and policymakers to promote the rights of people with disabilities in Oregon law, regulations, and guidance.

Number of organizations signing onto policy guidelines or proposals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Collaborate with other civil and human rights organizations to promote and defend the rights of people in Oregon and in the United States.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

REFORM OREGON'S FOSTER CARE SYSTEM: The American Academy of Pediatrics identifies mental health and behavioral health as the “greatest unmet health need for children and teens in foster care.” Children who have experienced trauma and mental health issues need services and treatment from the day they enter care so they can begin to heal. This will help curb the revolving door of foster placements and avoid children ending up in institutions because we've failed to meet their basic healthcare needs.

ENSURE EQUAL ACCESS TO EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES: Every child needs different supports to thrive in their classroom and develop the skills they need to succeed in life. Yet, hundreds of Oregon children don't attend full days of school for months or even years at a time because of the school is incapable of supporting the behavioral, social, and emotional needs of children with disabilities. Some children are removed from school altogether and given an hour or two of tutoring per day. With the right supports, all children can learn in school alongside their classmates. DRO is working on behalf of children with disabilities to force the State to play a larger role in making sure that school districts are equipped to support children with disabilities in their classrooms. This struggle is about making sure that children with disabilities can live in our world. Providing them with the proper supports at a crucial moment early in their lives will give them the foundation they need to thrive in their classrooms and communities for years to come.

END THE CRIMINALIZATION OF MENTAL ILLNESS: Disability Rights Oregon works to end the criminalization of mental illness, promote independence and community living for people with mental health conditions, and improve conditions in Oregon jails and prisons for people in mental health crisis. In 2002, Disability Rights Oregon brought a landmark civil rights case against the state because people with mental illness were languishing in jail. The Ninth Circuit ruled that the state psychiatric hospital must accept within seven days people found to not have the mental capacity to stand trial because they are unable to help their attorney defend them in court—what is called "aid and assist." In 2019, wait times in jail began climbing again and we returned to court to enforce the Court decision.

PROTECTING THE LIBERTY OF PROTECTED PERSONS: Courts appoint guardians when it is necessary to protect a person’s health or safety. A guardian can make decisions that affect another person’s care and well-being, such as where they live, what healthcare they get, and how they spend their time. Once guardianships are in place, there is very little monitoring by the courts. Disability Rights Oregon is working to ensure protected person are able to live with as much self-determination and independence as possible and that guardianship is limited to meet a person's actual needs, and nothing more.

We work to promote and defend the rights of people with disabilities through multi-modal, legally-based advocacy.

1. EMPOWER SELF-ADVOCATES: Providing tools, training, and supports to empower people with disabilities to be strong advocates for themselves and to push-back against the discrimination they experience in our society.

2. GROW THE MOVEMENT & EDUCATE THE PUBLIC: Educating the public and policymakers about the changes we need to see in our society to have a community where people with disabilities have the opportunity to pursue their dreams.

3. ADVOCATE FOR BETTER SOCIAL POLICY: Advocating and lobbying for changes in State and Federal law to create the social change that people with disabilities need to realize equity in our communities.

4. PROVIDE LEGALLY-BASED ADVOCACY WHEN CIVIL RIGHTS ARE VIOLATED: Providing free, legally-based advocacy services to people with disabilities who are experiencing discrimination.

REFORM OREGON'S FOSTER CARE SYSTEM: Disability Rights Oregon's legal staff are hard at work to enforce the civil rights of children with disabilities, LGBTQIA+ children, and youth in Oregon's foster care system. Disability Rights Oregon has demonstrative its capability to conduct this work through Wyatt B. v. Brown, class action litigation filed in 2019 against the State of Oregon.

ENSURE EQUAL ACCESS TO EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES: Disability Rights Oregon's legal staff are hard at work to enforce the civil rights of children with disabilities in Oregon's public education system. Disability Rights Oregon has demonstrative its capability to conduct this work through J.N. v. Oregon Department of Education, class action litigation filed in 2019 against the State of Oregon.

END THE CRIMINALIZATION OF MENTAL ILLNESS: Disability Rights Oregon's mental health rights project staff work to create systems that divert people with mental illness in crisis away from the criminal justice system. Our staff who are dedicated to this work are engaged in police accountability, policy advocacy, litigation, and report writing.

PROTECTING THE LIBERTY OF PROTECTED PERSONS: Disability Rights Oregon's legal staff are among the foremost experts on guardianship and alternatives to guardianship in Oregon. Through our Project Independence, we work to support people with disabilities who wish to limit or end a guardianship. We work in partnership with the Oregon Long Term Care Ombudsman and allies in the disability rights movement.

REFORM OREGON'S FOSTER CARE SYSTEM & ENSURE EQUAL ACCESS TO EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES:Disability Rights Oregon has filed major class action litigation to enforce the rights of children with disabilities, LGBTQIA+ children, and youth in Oregon's foster care system and public education system. This litigation may take multiple years to obtain relief. However, we also work in close collaboration with our partners in the Oregon Legislature to protect children in foster care from abuse and neglect, including children sent to contracted facilities out of state.

END THE CRIMINALIZATION OF MENTAL ILLNESS: In 2002, Disability Rights Oregon brought a landmark civil rights case against the state because people with mental illness were languishing in jail. The Ninth Circuit ruled that the state psychiatric hospital must accept within seven days people found to not have the mental capacity to stand trial because they are unable to help their attorney defend them in court—what is called "aid and assist." In 2019, wait times in jail began climbing again and we returned to court to enforce the Court decision. We continue to enforce this court order.

Inmates who experience a mental illness are at enormous risk of being subjected to and harmed by the use of canines to extract jail inmates from their cells. In the fall of 2018, we issued a report to bring attention to the fact that Columbia County was using canines for this purpose and to call for a statewide ban. During the 2019 state legislative session, we successfully advocated for a statewide ban on the use of police canines in jail (SB 495).

Our 2017 investigative report “‘Don’t Look Around’: A Window into Inhumane Conditions for Youth at NORCOR” uncovered that this facility was neglecting the mental health and social development of the kids who were detained there. Our investigation resulted in (a) a restructuring of the detention facility’s oversight and governance, (b) the end of over-using lockdown time, (c) giving kids more visits with loved ones, and (d) eliminating excessively punitive rules, such as forbidding kids from “looking around,” in favor of an evidence-based positive behavior management system.

PROTECTING THE LIBERTY OF PROTECTED PERSONS: Guardianship is a highly intrusive restriction on the rights and self-determination of a person. For nearly 30 years, Disability Rights Oregon has been fighting to uphold the civil rights of individuals under guardianship. Since 1991, Disability Rights Oregon has worked through the Courts and Legislature to strengthen protections for people with disabilities. In 2019, Disability Rights Oregon secured a victory when the Legislature enhanced due process protections by requiring notice to a person who may be subjected to guardianship. Notice is vital for allow a person to challenge the loss of their liberty.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Our annual goals are developed based upon input from the community we serve. Goals change from year-to-year based on this feedback.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Disability Rights Oregon
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Disability Rights Oregon

Board of directors
as of 01/18/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jan Campbell

Disability Awareness Resource Team

Term: 2017 - 2023

Gabrielle Guedon

Oregon Self Advocacy Coalition

Barbara Dirks

Retired, Kaiser Permanente

Evelyn Lowry

Retired, Oregon Center for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs

Michael Szporluk

Consultant

Jan Campbell

Disability Awareness Resource Team

Cindi Polychronis

David Evans and Associates, Inc.

Morgan Montgomery

Wells Fargo

Vickie Johnson

United Methodist Church

Michael Tom

Workplace Investigations & Trainings

Emilie Turner

Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/30/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/30/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.