WildCat Ridge Sanctuary

A New Beginning

aka WildCat Ridge Sanctuary   |   Scotts Mill, OR   |  www.wildcatridgesanctuary.org

Mission

To provide a safe, natural lifetime home for captive-born wildcats in need.

Ruling year info

2001

Co-Founder/CEO

Cheryl Tuller

Co-Founder/President

Mike Tuller

Main address

PO Box 280

Scotts Mill, OR 97375 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

93-1320051

NTEE code info

Wildlife Sanctuary/Refuge (D34)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Zoo, Zoological Society (D50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Captive-raised wildlife is primarily bred for the sole purpose of profit. Unscrupulous breeders of exotic animals play a significant role to supply the demand for the exotic animal pet trade, circuses, and traveling acts, photo ops, roadside zoos, commercial ads, movies, and trophies for canned hunts. Most of these animals are forced to live in extreme confinement in unnatural environments. Once the animals are no longer profitable or deemed inconvenient, they are oftentimes destroyed. The lucky ones will find refuge at a true sanctuary to live out their remaining years. However, most sanctuaries in the U.S. are full and overcapacity. Most do not have the funds or the space to accommodate additional animals. Under most circumstances, captive-raised wildlife cannot be released successfully into the wild. There are a few known conservation projects that have released captive-raised wildlife into the wild- the survival rates are very low, especially for carnivores.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Rescue

WildCat Haven's focus is to provide a lifetime home for captive-born wildcats offering them the kind of care and respect each and everyone deserves. As a true sanctuary, we do not, buy, sell, breed or trade the animals and we are not open to the public to ensure that the residents live a peaceful, safe home to live out their lives.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Working to stop the captive wildlife crisis and exploitation of these animals. Provide lifetime homes for captive-born wildcat, work with accredited sanctuaries as needed and promote the philosophy wild animals are not pets or things to exploit.

By using our platform to educate the public.

With our website and social media we reach over 340,000 people worldwide with our message.

Since 2001 we have worked with other sanctuaries to take in wildcats as needed for a lifetime home and we continue to promote the work of all true sanctuaries

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    While our primary focus is on the animals themselves, in reality we are serving a variety of people with our rescue work. In addition to members of the public who have been convinced that keeping a wild animal as a pet is "safe", our work also serves front-line responders who are not properly trained for an encounter with a tiger and would be at extreme risk while performing their job.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), mailers, enews updates, social media,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In utilizing social media, our keepers have begun to interact on a more direct basis with our fans and followers. They can answer questions about our rescues in close to real-time and help educate those that follow us. This came from people asking questions during our viral TikTok videos.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has allowed us to help guide the conversation about our rescues and why we feel

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

WildCat Ridge Sanctuary
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

WildCat Ridge Sanctuary

Board of directors
as of 3/3/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mike Tuller

WildCat Ridge Sanctuary

Term: 2001 -


Board co-chair

Cheryl Tuller

Wildcat Ridge Sanctuary

Term: 2001 -

Cheryl Tuller

WildCat Ridge

James Caliva

WildCat Ridge

Linda Melton

WildCat Ridge

Mike Tuller

WildCat Ridge

Ian Ford

WildCat Ridge

Cheryl Starr

WildCat Ridge

Jan Vales

WildCat Ridge

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/3/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Female

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data