PLATINUM2021

Center for Domestic Peace

Working together to end domestic violence

aka Marin Abused Women's Services   |   San Rafael, CA   |  www.centerfordomesticpeace.org

Mission

Center for Domestic Peace mobilizes individuals and communities to transform our world so domestic violence no longer exists, creating greater safety, justice, and equality.

Ruling year info

1977

Principal Officer

Ms. Donna Garske

Main address

734 A Street

San Rafael, CA 94901 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Marin Abused Women's Services

EIN

94-2415856

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Women's Rights (R24)

Spouse Abuse, Prevention of (I71)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Center for Domestic Peace (C4DP) leads a comprehensive community effort to end the #1 violent crime in Marin County: domestic violence. We provide transformational services and programs that protect and enhance victim safety, and ultimately engage our community in permanent change.

We provide transformational services and programs that protect and enhance victim safety, and ultimately engage our community in permanent change.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Shelter

Since 1978, Center for Domestic Peace’s 30-bed emergency shelter has provided a safe, confidential refuge for battered women and their children. The shelter provides residents with a wide variety of services including, food and clothing, support groups, children's services, parenting information, drug and alcohol education, assistance securing long-term housing, and referrals to other social service, community, legal, and job-training agencies. In an effort to promote the transition to independence, we have structured the shelter program to provide the necessary support while also encouraging the women to take control and responsibility for their own lives.

Population(s) Served
Age groups

Nationally, there are very few transitional housing facilities for battered women and their children.  In the San Francisco Bay Area, the Second Step transitional housing program is an indispensable service for families rebuilding their lives. The availability of affordable housing is one of the key factors enabling a woman and her children to successfully leave an abusive relationshiincluding the ability to obtain a job, earn a living wage, and successfully maintain economic independence and stability.  These services include: employment services, assistance finding permanent housing, individualized case management, childcare, transportation, support groups, advocacy services, referrals to various social services, and a range of educational classes and skill-building workshops designed to promote economic independence and self-reliance. These workshops include computer skills, money management, fundamental financial skills, interview techniques, and personal health issues, such as stress reduction and nutrition. Center for Domestic Peace is the only organization in Marin County that provides transitional housing coupled with support programs for battered women and their children. Last fiscal year the Second Step program assisted 29 women and 64 children in 21 units.

Population(s) Served
Families

The goals of Center for Domestic Peace’s men’s program, ManKind, are twofold: to help men end their immediate violence and abuse of their partners; and to engage men in community advocacy to change the attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors that support men’s violence against women and girls.  The 52-week, reeducation classes, under the direction of a trained class facilitator, provide a supportive environment in which men explore how they have come to adopt a belief system in which they expect to have authority over and services from their partners, and how this belief system has led them to violent behavior. Last year we had 92 participants. In addition, 16 women attended WomanKind to learn skills to stop their violent behavior.

Population(s) Served
Adults

LSAP works to increase a victim’s ability to achieve effective results within the criminal justice and legal systems, and to increase awareness and use of the support services available in the community. CAP links victims to the various services they need at a time when it is most emotionally difficult for them to access such services, and thus it fills the last major gap in services for victims of domestic violence who may otherwise be unaware of their options. CAP advocates can respond in English or Spanish, and they offer victims safety planning, domestic violence counseling, referrals, court accompaniment, and assistance with social service and other needs. Last fiscal year, CAP served appro 400 participants.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of bed nights (nights spent in shelter)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total bednights of shelter and transitional housing - both programs combined. We track on fiscal year, not calendar, so these are for FY 18.19, 17.18, 16.17 and 15.16

Number of crisis hotline calls answered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These are fiscal years, not calendar. 24/7 hotline support in English and Spanish - including safety planning, emotional support, referrals, and information

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

C4DP holds the vision of a world in which DV, abuse, and intimidation is replaced with domestic peace. We believe that all women, youth, children, and men who are abused and at risk of abuse have a right to immediate and long-term safety. We strive to create greater safety, justice, and equality for all by building awareness and action toward changing the social norms that promote or enforce violence against women. We seek to make DV a major community concern among all residents and social institutions (schools, hospitals, police departments, etc.). We believe that change results from the action-oriented participation of large numbers of people, organizations, and institutions, inclusive of survivors. We see intergenerational leadership as essential in our multigenerational task of ending DV and violence against women and girls.

Safety and Empowerment: Ensure the availability of needed services for complex populations.
• Strengthen C4DP's understanding of and responsiveness to diverse populations, including all genders, sexual orientations/LGBTQ, ages, ethnicities, socio-economic classes; and leverage relationships with allies within those populations.
• Explore new and alternative models to address survivor’s short- and long-term needs by meeting survivor where they are.
• Diversify strategies that hold abusers accountable and that end their violence and coercive behaviors.
• Explore new and alternative models of providing services and solutions to achieve our ends, e.g. new ways of “sheltering.”
• Expand efforts with youth (ages 11-24) to increase their help-seeking behavior.
• Expand strategies to address how technology has provided abusers with additional opportunities/tools for control.

Community Responsiveness Partnerships and Community Action: Reinvigorate our commitment to a social movement theory in which change results from the action-oriented participation of large numbers of people, organizations, and institutions, inclusive of survivors.
• Build on our work with the Coordinated Community Response to Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Network.
• Broaden and deepen C4DP’s community-based youth leadership and multi-generational work to increase community responsiveness and action.
• Expand C4DP’s work promoting the protective factor of social connectedness and reduced isolation as it relates to survivors’ well-being.
• Deepen opportunities for building local and regional strategic partnerships that encourage community action, advance equity, and reduce inequities related to domestic violence.

Social Transformation Awareness and Action: Continue the work of Transforming Communities to build awareness and action toward changing social norms that promote or enforce violence against women.
• Continue to align with other progressive and women’s organizations within Marin and in conjunction with regional, state, and national campaigns.
• Increase C4DP’s role in the community to address the intersections between racist, classist, and anti-LGBTQ oppression in policies that impact the domestic violence response to survivors.
• Increase learning opportunities for community member to understand the intersections between racism, classism, LGBTQ oppression, gender roles, and violence against women.
• Increase skills and confidence of community members to respond to dating abuse and domestic violence (including building an understanding of generational differences and how violence and abuse change throughout the life span).
• Broaden and deepen C4DP's work in promoting youth leadership toward social norm change that moves us toward ending dating and domestic violence.
• Increase understanding of how dating and domestic violence affects well-being and productivity of community, family members, and friends; promote actions to ensure well-being.

44 years of experience being a survivor-centric and trauma informed organization.

C4DP leads a comprehensive community effort to end the number one violence crime in Marin County – domestic violence (DV). Since its founding, C4DP has responded to the needs of more than 190,000 individuals victimized by DV and their children, as well as more than 29,000 men who have been violent.

C4DP was founded in 1977 by a group of visionary women, operating under the name Marin Abused Women's Services, with abused women sent to private homes for safety. C4DP has continued to expand, starting a crisis hotline and shelter in 1978, one of the nations first transitional housing program in 1983, the nation's first 24-hour hotline for violent men and classes for batterers to learn to stop their violence (ManKind and WomanKind) in 1982, a legal advocacy program in 1998, and an initiative for youth in 2011, with children exposed to domestic violence added in 2014. One of 9 in the country to receive this funding.

As a result of the services they receive from C4DP, victims and survivors of DV are able to rebuild their lives violence-free, becoming economically self-sufficient and independent and preventing them and their children from experiencing further violence.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS in last 3 years:

1. Completion of “The House that Love Built” capital campaign ($1.5M raised) to increase bed capacity of emergency shelter from 15 beds to 30 beds, 100% increase. This included making the facility completely ADA compliant, with an accessible entrance, bedroom, and bathroom.
2. Redesigned and consolidated two hotlines into one 24/7 bilingual Spanish/English hotline, which has an annual call volume of 7,000 calls.
3. One of 26 projects in the country selected for a multi-year demonstration grant program through Administration for Children and Families that will evaluate C4DP’s “In This Together” group therapy program.

Adding that since the pandemic, we had to fast-forward our technical advances, accelerate our training, and focus on technology to respond to our staff, participants, community collaborators, and donors while also being mindful of caring for ourselves and our families. Overnight C4DP’s 55-person workforce began pivoting to new ways of working, both remotely and with reduced direct contact with the shelter and transitional housing residents. These changes required coordination with multiple systems and institutions also undergoing their own rapid change process. We paid particular attention to the increased risk and vulnerabilities victims faced being trapped in their homes with their abuser.

With the right combination of public will, financial resources, and the clarity of C4DP’s continued strategic efforts, Marin is poised to be one of the first communities to see domestic violence arrest rates steadily decline over multiple years.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Center for Domestic Peace
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Center for Domestic Peace

Board of directors
as of 09/15/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Cynthia Murray

Toni Nies

Antoinette G. Nies, CPA

Aida Cecilia Castro Garcia

Family, Youth, and Children's Services Division, Sonoma County

Laura Collins

Volunteer

Mary Jane Elliott

Media Literacy Educator & Feminist Book Club Leader, Self-Employed

Carol Miller

Physician, Professor, UCSF School of Medicine

Donna Motluk

Self-Employed

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/15/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/27/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.