Community Improvement, Capacity Building

Global Hunger Project dba The Hunger Project

aka THP

New York, NY

Mission

The Hunger Project is a global, non-profit, strategic organization committed to the sustainable end of world hunger. Our vision is a world where every woman, man and child leads a healthy, fulfilling life of self-reliance and dignity.

Our mission is to end hunger and poverty by pioneering sustainable, grassroots, women-centered strategies and advocating for their widespread adoption in countries throughout the world.

Ruling Year

1978

President and CEO

Ms. Suzanne Mayo Frindt

Main Address

110 West 30th Street 6th floor

New York, NY 10001 USA

Keywords

global,hunger,nutrition,empowerment, mobilization, self-reliance,women,international

EIN

94-2443282

 Number

2703539226

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Rural (S32)

Women's Rights (R24)

Other Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition N.E.C. (K99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

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Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Epicenter Strategy

Women's Empowerment

Where we workNew!

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of people who have participated in the HIV/AIDS and Gender Inequality Workshops

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Epicenter Strategy

Context notes

Global numbers

Number of women participating in leadership training

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Females

Related program

Women's Empowerment

Context notes

Global numbers

Estimated number of people our programs reached

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Context notes

Global numbers

Number of participants in water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) community meetings, workshops, and campaigns

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Context notes

Global numbers

Number of participants in income generating and skills workshops

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Context notes

Global numbers

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

To end hunger and poverty by pioneering sustainable, grassroots, women-centered strategies and advocating for their widespread adoption in countries throughout the world.

Through our work to end hunger, we have recognized these ten principles as being fundamental to The Hunger Project. We challenge ourselves to ensure that each of our strategies builds on these principles.

Human Dignity. All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights, including the right to food, health, work and education. The inherent nature of every person is creative, resourceful, self-reliant, responsible and productive. We must not treat people living in conditions of hunger as beneficiaries, which can crush dignity, but rather as the key resource for ending hunger.
Gender Equality. An essential part of ending hunger must be to cause society-wide change towards gender equality. Women bear the major responsibility for meeting basic needs, yet are systematically denied the resources, freedom of action and voice in decision-making to fulfill that responsibility.
Empowerment. In the face of social suppression, focused and sustained action is required to awaken people to the possibility of self-reliance, to build confidence, and to organize communities to take charge of their own development.
Leverage. Ending chronic hunger requires action that catalyzes large-scale systemic change. We must regularly step back — assess our impact within the evolving social/political/economic environment — and launch the highest leverage actions we can to meet this challenge.
Interconnectedness. Our actions are shaped by, and affect, all other people and our natural environment. Hunger and poverty are not problems of one country or another but are global issues. We must solve them not as “donors and recipients" but as global citizens, working as coequal partners in a common front to end hunger.
Sustainability. Solutions to ending hunger must be sustainable locally, socially, economically and environmentally.
Social Transformation. People's self-reliance is suppressed by conditions such as corruption, armed conflict, racism and the subjugation of women. These are all rooted in an age-old and nearly universal patriarchal mindset that must be transformed as part of a fundamental shift in the way society is organized.
Holistic Approach. Hunger is inextricably linked to a nexus of issues including decent work, health, education, environmental sustainability and social justice. Only in solving these together will any of them be solved on a sustainable basis.
Decentralization. Individual and community ownership of local development is critical. Actions are most successful if decisions are made close to the people. This requires effective national and local government working in partnership with the people.
Transformative Leadership. Ending hunger requires a new kind of leadership: one that awakens people to their own power — leadership with people rather than over them.

Our programs in almost 20,000 communities throughout Africa, South Asia and Latin America are based on an innovative, holistic approach, which empowers women and men living in rural villages to become the agents of their own development and make sustainable progress in overcoming hunger and poverty.

While adapted to meet local challenges and opportunities wherever we work, all our programs have at their foundation these three essential elements:

1. Empowering women as key change agents
2. Mobilizing communities for self-reliant action
3. Fostering effective partnerships with local government

One of our first activities is a Vision, Commitment and Action Workshop, which serve as the foundation of our work, inspiring individuals to move from “I can't" to “I can" to “We can." Through participation in our training, people set a vision for their communities, and then lay out the actions they will take to achieve that vision. Read more about our innovative approach to ending hunger and poverty. Visit www.thp.org

350+ staff indigenous to the countries where we work.
Over 395,000 volunteers globally
A state of the art Monitoring and Evaluation system designed in partnership with our community partners
Partnerships with local governments and institutions
Fundraising strategies that inspire both — our investors (donors) and community partners
A vibrant advocacy movement called Gender-focused Community-led Development

Monitoring and Evaluation:

Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation
The Hunger Project's Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) philosophy is based on three principles:

Measure what matters

Our M&E system serves as the framework for best delivering on our organizational mission to end hunger and poverty by empowering individuals and communities.

Start with grassroots, community-led engagement

This critical feedback loop directly connects our project performance to community expectations and goals.

Objectivity is key

Transparency and accountability for data are embedded throughout the processes of M&E.

Why M&E?
At The Hunger Project, we believe in measuring what matters. As an organization grounded in grassroots advocacy and international development from the bottom up, understanding the extent of our interventions' impact at the community level is paramount—for our community partners, our dedicated global staff, our investors and policy makers considering adopting our approach. Our M&E system serves as a critical framework for delivering on our organizational mission to end hunger and poverty by empowering individuals and communities with knowledge, information, and opportunities for achieving sustainable self-reliance.

As an essential precondition to evaluating The Hunger Project's global performance, it is important to collect reliable primary data for outputs and outcomes (both qualitative and quantitative) as well as existing data from secondary sources. This allows The Hunger Project to critically analyze where our partner communities 'rank' when it comes to issues, such as malnutrition or access to healthcare, compared to regional and national averages. As the overall goal of our Participatory M&E system is to recognize what works and what does not work (and why) within project implementation, this feedback loop directly connects our project performance to community expectations and goals.

Our M&E system serves The Hunger Project's entire network of partners working in 12 countries in almost 20,000 communities, reaching more than 18.1 million individuals around the world. As program country staff and volunteers lead their communities to make improvements in areas such as health, literacy, education, gender-based violence, food security, income and local democracy, The Hunger Project's M&E system provides a necessary framework for understanding and enhancing these strides.

The Hunger Project's program countries have diligently been tracking activities and output indicators on a quarterly basis since 2008. For more details visit:
http://thp.org/our-work/measuring-our-work/

With more financial resources, THP could deepen and expand its programs on the ground.
Building stronger government partnerships to have them take on our strategies and methodologies, to cause further breakthroughs in ending hunger in the world.

External Reviews

Financials

Global Hunger Project dba The Hunger Project

Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

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  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2016, 2016 and 2015
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2016, 2016 and 2015
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to see what's included.

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes