Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern Sierra

Defenders of Potential

Placerville, CA   |  www.bbbsns.org

Mission

Our Mission is to create and support one-to-one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth.

Ruling year info

1979

Chief Executive Officer

Mrs. Brenda Frachiseur

Associate Director

Mrs. Chelsea Jolly

Main address

535 Main

Placerville, CA 95667 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-2523254

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BBBS provides young people ages 3-17 (Littles), who face adversity such as poverty, domestic violence, food instability, homelessness, incarcerated parent(s) or may be living in a single parent or guardian home or foster care, with committed adult mentors (Bigs). These relationships are strategically matched based on Littles’ needs and Bigs’ backgrounds and skills, as well as common interests, aspirations, and personalities. Littles benefit from a positive role model who advocates for them and helps them reach their full potential. Currently serving hundreds of Littles every year, BBBS is part of the largest mentoring organization in the world, and the ONLY mentoring organization that professionally supports each child/mentor match.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Based Mentoring

Using standards provided by the national organization, adult volunteer mentors are screened, trained and strategically matched with children, ages 3-18. They provide one-to-one time and attention to a child who is considered to be "at-risk" and create long-term relationships. Activities take place throughout the community.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children

Adult volunteer mentors, screened and trained using the national standards provided by the national organization offer children age 6-18 individualized time and attention on a consistent basis, with the venue being the child's school campus or after-school program.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children

Where we work

Accreditations

BBBSA 1979

Awards

Rated 4 out of 4 stars 2012

Charity Navigator

Gold Star 2012

Forbes Magazine

#1 Non-Profit for At-Risk Youth 2011

GuideStar's Philanthropedia

Affiliations & memberships

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America 1979

Chamber of Commerce 2000

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America - Pinnacle Award 2018

Big Brothers Big Sister of America - Small Agency of the Year 2019

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America - Pinnacle Award 2019

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America - Pinnacle Award 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percentage of children who have improved peer relationships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Children are asked how they feel about themselves and their relationships with other children. This number represents a percentage of children in all programs.

Percentage of children who have improved self-esteem

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Children are asked how they feel about themselves. This number represents a percentage of children in all programs.

Percentage of children who have improved higher educational expectations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Children are asked about their future academic plans. This number represents a percentage of children in all programs.

Percentage of children who have improved grades

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number represents a percentage of children in all programs.

Percentage of children who have improved attitudes toward risky behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Children are asked how they feel about a variety of risky behaviors. This number represents a percentage of children in all programs.

Percentage of children who have improved parental trust

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number represents a percentage of children in all programs.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This includes children served on the Western Slope of El Dorado County. In 2015, BBBS closed "in-active" matches between Bigs & Littles in order to expand services to the South Lake Tahoe community.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern Sierra (BBBS) has served El Dorado County since 1977 and Nevada & Placer counties since 1979. We proudly exist with the belief that inherent in every child is potential and they have the ability to succeed and thrive in life.

Mentoring is based on the premise that predictable, consistent relationships with stable, competent adults can help youth cope with challenges and steer clear of high-risk behaviors. Mentors provide guidance and support, teach positive behaviors and help young people build self-confidence. In short term goals, youth involved in our programs do better in school and have better relationships with their parents and peers. In the long term, we have seen our youth avoid risky behaviors, such as violence and substance abuse and go on to college at rates higher than the national average.

Mentoring relationships with stable, competent adults, help youth cope with challenges, encourage positive behaviors and build self-confidence. Strong kids ultimately create strong communities.

As an evidence-based program, we implement the established service delivery model and standards of practice provided by the National organization. We also utilize school report cards and school delinquency reports during case management and evaluation.

Each child in the program is assigned a professionally trained case manager who:
➢ Screens, checks references and facilitates training to the adult mentors (“Bigs")
➢ Evaluates the child (“Little"), including emotional, mental and physical needs.
➢ Applies these evaluations to carefully match the child to the right mentor.
➢ Coordinates with parents and the child's school in order to ensure child safety and match productivity
➢ Continuously monitors and evaluates the match to ensure child safety and positive outcomes

The case manager monitors and supports the mentoring relationship throughout the match. Once the match begins, the case manager has frequent meetings with the Big and the Little to continue to evaluate the relationship, ensure child safety and positive impact. All records and observations are recorded in the Big Brothers Big Sisters of America Agency Information Management Database (AIM). In addition, Big Brothers and Big Sisters of El Dorado County uses the following standard impact measurement surveys established by the national organization. These are also conducted by the assigned case manager and recorded in AIM.

➢ The National Strength of Relationship Survey, which is completed by both the Big and the Little at the start of the match, 90 days into the establishment of the match and then annually.
➢ The National Youth Outcome Survey, which cost of developing and maintaining a single mentoring match between a "Big" (the mentor) and a "Little" (the child) is $1,140.00 per year. Each child is assigned to a professional case manager who evaluates and screens adult volunteers, evaluates the child and carefully matches the child to the right mentor. The case manager monitors and supports the mentoring relationship throughout the match. The case manager also facilitates regularly at the school site to ensure child safety and relationship growth.

As with most prevention type services, this cost is in great contrast to what El Dorado County spends per year ($114,000) for incarcerated juvenile offenders. When the costs for mental health care are added, the county spends well over $150,000/year per capita for incarcerated juvenile offenders. The cost savings of having youth participate in Big Brothers Big Sisters verses dropping out of school, committing crime, becoming incarcerated in a juvenile facility, or simply achieving less in life than they otherwise could, is clear – mentoring works - and it does so in a cost effective manner.

BBBS has long-standing relationships with partners throughout the county who refer children and volunteers to the program. Our case managers work closely with these partners to ensure child safety both at school and outside of school, and to help families of the Littles find resources that improve their quality of life.

COMMUNITY PARTNERS WHO REFER CHILDREN/VOLUNTEERS INTO OUR PROGRAM:

Boys & Girls Club of El Dorado County
CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates)
CAPC (Child Abuse Prevention Council)
CSS (Child Support Services)
CPS (Child Protective Services)
City of Placerville
County of El Dorado
Drug Free Divide
EDCOE (El Dorado Office of Education)
El Dorado County Fire Department
El Dorado County Mental Health Department
El Dorado County Probation Office
El Dorado County Sheriff's Office
First 5
Green Valley Christian Church
New Morning Youth and Family Services
Placerville Police Department
Retired Teacher Association of El Dorado County
Rolling Hills Christian Church SARB (Student Attendance Review Board)
The Center for Violence Free Relationships

EL DORADO COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICTS:

Black Oak Mine Unified School District
Buckeye Union School District
Camino Union Elementary School District
El Dorado Union High School District
Gold Oak Union School District
Gold Trail Union School District
Mother Lode Union School District
Pioneer Union School District
Placerville Union School District
Pollock Pines Elementary School District
Rescue Union School District

COMMUNITY PARTNERS WHO PROVIDE VOLUNTEERS AND ADDITIONAL FUNDING:
Amdocs
Big Hairy Dog
Blue Shield of California
Business Workspaces
DST
El Dorado County Community Foundation
El Dorado Disposal
Intel
Kiwanis of El Dorado County
Kohl's
Parker Development Company
Rotary Club of Cameron Park
Rotary Club of El Dorado County
Target
Wells Fargo

BBBS was created as a result of a few community members with vision. They saw children in El Dorado County who were in need of positive role models and families who couldn’t provide for the basic needs of their children. They knew the need would eventually become greater and indeed, they were correct. During the past five years, we have seen children struggle with increased needs and more severe challenges. Accordingly, the annual budget has increased 300% and building upon the core one-to-one community-based mentoring model, BBBS has developed innovative programs to meet the community’s needs. These programs include:
Beyond School Walls – a program that not only introduces a child to a new adult friend and role model, but exposes them to a positive work environment and possible career path.
Start Early – the only one of its kind in the Nation, this program provides mentors for children as young as 3 years old and focuses on prevention of mental health issues.
Bigs in Blue – offers an opportunity for officers to create meaningful relationship with children who may view law enforcement as a “threat” more than a “friend”.
Tomorrow’s Path Together – designed for incarcerated youth and those on probation, this program connects youth involved in the juvenile justice system with positive adult mentors.

BBBS has steadily gained local community recognition, as well as national recognition, recently receiving the Pinnacle Award. El Dorado County is one of only six affiliates Nationwide to receive this award, placing BBBS in the top 2% of the Nation for efficacy.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Youth and families

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Example: Policy for annual home assessments of volunteers to ensure child safety

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    More inclusive and comprehensive understanding of needs/concerns

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern Sierra
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern Sierra

Board of directors
as of 11/08/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Stephanie Carlson

El Dorado County Health & Human Services

Term: 2021 - 2023

Sue VanDelinder

El Dorado Disposal

Dianne Deitchman

Retired - EDCOE

Mary Calligan

Secretary, Retired - EDCOE

Rob Bilo

Nationwide Insurance

Melissa Kistler

EDCOE

Davia Weiner

Law Offices of Adam Weiner

Jill Christiansen

President, Amdocs

Brett Michelin

Association of Accessible Medicines

Keith Bladen

Retired - Intel

Greg Glunt

Treasurer, Retirement Securities Centers

Dylan Sullivan

El Dorado County

Faith Sprague

Leisure Homes

Lisa Rankin

re:Visions

Julie Anderson

Retired - Allworth

Jana Pingle

Retired - Consultant

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/9/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/04/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.