Choice in Aging

aka Choice in Aging   |   Pleasant Hill, CA   |  www.choiceinaging.org

Mission

Our mission is to create opportunities where people can learn, grow, and age independently with dignity and community.

Notes from the nonprofit

During this pandemic the people we serve are at the greatest risk for the poorest outcomes. At Choice in Aging and Choice in Learning we pivoted from a congregate setting to a "Roadshow" model, which has enabled us to connect with our folks and their caregivers. We have been able to continue our services not only via Zoom, but also with socially distanced in person meetings. Live music and exercise, holiday and birthday celebrations, customized goody bag and classes have made the difference between loneliness and joy to our friends. We are now able to provide in home nursing and physical and occupational therapies.

Ruling year info

1982

President & CEO

Ms. Debbie Toth

Main address

490 Golf Club Rd

Pleasant Hill, CA 94523 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Rehabilitation Services of Northern California

EIN

94-2822559

NTEE code info

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Choice in Aging fights tirelessly for the independence and dignity of adults with disabilities and special needs, with the goal of preventing premature placement into nursing homes and unnecessary hospitalizations. Choice in Aging also addresses the issue of ageism with an intergenerational program Choice in Learning Montessori. It ensures that these students see firsthand the value of elders and those with disabilities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Bedford Center for Adult Day Health Care

Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) and social Adult Day Program (ADP) programs are offered at both Mt. Diablo Center and The Bedford Center and provide the services needed for frail elderly and disabled adults to remain independent and retain their dignity while engaging in an active social life.

ADHC was founded in the 1970’s and is focused on adults maintaining their optimal level of cognitive and physical health. Each participant has a customized plan created by a team of health care professionals. The plan addresses an individual’s needs, and is designed to maintain and hopefully increase vitality and mental functioning, while giving their caregiver respite.

ADP offers a caring, supportive and social environment for those who don’t need health care interventions. Participants get physical and mental exercise through group work-outs and mind-sharpening games, and most importantly, social interaction and a sense of purpose and community. This program supports caregivers, and their wish to have their loved ones remain at home.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Caregivers

MSSP is a federally and state funded care management program that helps keep frail seniors safely at home and out of skilled nursing facilities. Our social workers and nurses work with you, your family and friends to set up the resources and services needed to allow you to live as independently as possible at no cost to those eligible.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

The California Community Transitions (CCT) project is the newest member for the Choice in Aging family of services. Adults who have been living in a skilled nursing facility for longer than 90 days and are covered by Medi-Cal can transition back to their home or to community living with the help of a Transition Coordinator.

Our Transition Coordinators work with a myriad of community services to find resources, make connections and ensure a safe changeover to independent living. Make your own decisions about where and with whom to live. Explore your choices!

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Adults

The Prevention and Early Access for Seniors program (PEAS) is a mental health case management program that strives to identify Older Adults 60+ in Solano County that are struggling to find and or maintain a positive quality of life. PEAS can provide: intake, referral, brief and comprehensive case management, community based psychotherapy, and education/outreach services to both professionals and the community. Our universal prevention strategy addresses the high rates of depression, anxiety and isolation amongst our seniors. Collectively, PEAS services will increase the likelihood more people will get the intervention they need to avoid mental health challenges that could lead to crisis.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
LGBTQ people

Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) and social Adult Day Program (ADP) programs are offered at both Mt. Diablo Center and The Bedford Center and provide the services needed for frail elderly and disabled adults to remain independent and retain their dignity while engaging in an active social life. ADHC was founded in the 1970’s and is focused on adults maintaining their optimal level of cognitive and physical health. Each participant has a customized plan created by a team of health care professionals. The plan addresses an individual’s needs, and is designed to maintain and hopefully increase vitality and mental functioning, while giving their caregiver respite. ADP offers a caring, supportive and social environment for those who don’t need health care interventions. Participants get physical and mental exercise through group work-outs and mind-sharpening games, and most importantly, social interaction and a sense of purpose and community. This program supports caregivers, and their wish to have their loved ones remain at home.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Where we work

Awards

Best Montessori Preschool 2020

Parents Press

District 14 Nonprofit of the Year 2019

CA Association of Nonprofits/Assemblymember Tim Grayson

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

At Choice in Aging's Mt. Diablo Center these numbers reflect a yearly compilation of daily attendance of frail adults, many with disabilities at our Adult Day Health Program.

Hours of expertise provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers

Related Program

Mt. Diablo Center for Adult Day Health Care

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Monthly Caregiver Support Group for friends and families with loved one dealing with the challenges of caregiving for someone with Alzheimer's disease or related dementias at Mt. Diablo Center Campus

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Choice in Aging (CiA) provides adults with options to support their choice to live with dignity and as independently as possible. Choice in Aging offers day programs, transition services and complex case management for frail adults, including elders and those suffering with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. The day programs and services are designed for participants who can engage in a safe and a supportive environment during the day, while living independently at home or with family members or caregivers. CiA offers information and referrals to the local community, support for caregivers and family members, and advocacy for seniors and adults with disabilities.

Choice in Aging's core programs include: Adult Day Health Care (ADHC), a licensed health center with specialized programs for frail adults, those with mid to late stage Alzheimer's disease and unique multicultural programs offered in English, Russian and Farsi; the Multipurpose Senior Services Program (MSSP), a federally and state funded care management program that helps keep frail seniors safely at home and out of skilled nursing facilities; the California Community Transitions project (CCT), which helps adults living in skilled nursing facilities for over 90 days transition to community living or back home; and Community Based Health Home (CBHH), a nurse navigator program that brings the participant into their healthcare community , thereby ensuring all members of the healthcare team are providing coordinated services. The most recent addition to CiA's suite of programs is Choice in Learning Montessori, which is the first intergenerational Montessori preschool in Contra Costa County. The Prevention and Early Access Program for Seniors (PEAS) in Solano County strives to identify older adults (+60) in Solano County at risk, and provides the interventions needed to maintain a positive quality of life.

Choice in Aging has two day centers, Mt. Diablo Center in Pleasant Hill, CA and The Bedford Center in Antioch, CA. Mt. Diablo Center was the 16th licensed ADHC in California in 1982. Each participant's needs are holistically evaluated, including family support, resources, living situation and abilities. An applicant is assessed by a nurse, social worker, physical and occupational therapist, a nutritionist, and/or a speech pathologist if needed. Then a customized care plan is written to address the needs of each individual in maintaining their independence. This care plan outlines the daily activities, routines, medications, assistance and therapies needed.
The compilation of the assessments identify the individual's barriers to independence, and by addressing them through social, medical, and service based solutions, a plan is created to ensure independence and dignity. Staffing includes a medical director, pharmacist, psychologist, nurses, social workers, therapists (speech, occupational and physical), dietician, activity coordinators, direct care staff and a clinical program director that is responsible for overseeing regulatory compliance.
The expertise gained through decades of holistic health and social services equipped Choice in Aging to take on the MSSP in Contra Costa, Napa and Solano Counties and CCT. The successes of Choice in Aging have been recognized by other service organizations, such as Disability Rights California and the California Association for Adult Day Services, as well as by the County Board of Supervisors and a number of Assembly, Senate and Congress members.

Our California Community Staff has transitioned over 150 clients out of skilled nursing facilities and either back to their homes or into community living since inception. The program was initially in Contra Costa County, but has grown to encompass Solano and Sacramento Counties.
Mt. Diablo Center continues to provide the only licensed day program for frail adults in Central Contra Costa County, with dedicated programs in English, Farsi and Russian, as well as one for those suffering with mid to late stage Alzheimer's disease and dementias.
The Bedford Center is the only licensed day program in East Contra Costa County that includes nursing, social work and physical, speech and occupational therapies. The State of California recently approved an expansion to double the capacity to include the first dedicated program for those with mid to late stage Alzheimer's disease and dementias in East County.
Multipurpose Senior Services Program (MSSP) provides social and health care benefits and services to low income residents in Contra Costa 65 and older. The goal is to preserve health, improve functional ability and foster maximum independence to avoid premature nursing home placement. The program is at full capacity and serves 160 clients each month.
Community Based Health Home (CBHH) is a comprehensive person centered care model that allies with Mt. Diablo Center's program and serves clients with three to five or more chronic conditions with the goal of improving outcomes through the intense efforts of a RN Navigator who can work outside the center's walls. CBHH was funded as a two year pilot program, however to date there is not a mechanism for ongoing funding for this program. Choice in Aging recognizes the value of the program, and continues to fund the nurse navigator through donations and fundraising.
Choice in Learning Montessori preschool is a year old and continues to grow, and to offer intergenerational activities. It is a unique model in that it incorporates mentoring, but more importantly activities that encourage socialization and bonding, including opportunities to engage with Russian and Farsi speakers and their rich cultures. The model has proven to be a win-win for both groups.
Choice in Aging is in the final development stages of changing the model of how we age with a planned Aging in Place Community, which in addition to our current programs in Pleasant Hill will include independent housing, expanded day programs, and wrap around services on an all-encompassing campus. Groundbreaking is expected to be in late 2019.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    During the pandemic we had to change our service model at Mt. Diablo Center and The Bedford Center from a congregate setting. The shelter in place mandate required a quick pivot to ensure our participants maintained the social connections and therapies they need. We launched a "Roadshow" to provide food, live exercise and music, PPE, customized goody bags, socially distanced birthday and holiday celebrations and in home physical and occupational therapies and nursing. These touches are the difference between smiles and joy and isolation and deterioration.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Choice in Aging
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Choice in Aging

Board of directors
as of 06/08/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Victor Baker

Sheryl Rowold

Hellman & Friedman, LLC

Rita Hays

Former Caregiver/Consumer, Retired Workforce Development Administrator

Charlie Crothers

Victor Baker

Pacific Gas and Electric

Lawren Hicks, MD

John Muir Health

Lorna VanAckeren, RN

Continuum Hospice & Palliative Care

Karen Douglas

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/17/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/08/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.