Interaction Institute for Social Change

aka IISC   |   Boston, MA   |  www.interactioninstitute.org

Mission

IISC builds collaborative capacity in individuals, organizations, and networks working for social justice and racial equity.

Ruling year info

1984

President

Ms. Kelly Bates Esq.

Main address

867 Boylston Street 5th Floor #1264

Boston, MA 02116 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-2928341

NTEE code info

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

Management & Technical Assistance (R02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

When IISC started in 1993, we brought the power of collaboration to the social sector through our work with thousands of individuals, and hundreds of organizations and networks working to advance social justice. Over time we focused explicitly on the profound and persistent racial inequities that destroy people, communities, and the planet and that account for many of the challenges our clients face. Guided by our values and Collaborative Change Lens, we deepened our approach to supporting individuals, organizations, and networks to shift systems so that groups and communities that have been historically marginalized and oppressed by racism and other ism’s have an equitable share in the power and control of organizational and societal resources in order to ensure they are able to thrive and contribute to their communities and organizations.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Interaction Institute for Social Change (IISC)

IISC has five offerings:
Racial equity systems change (longer-term and sustained equity change; racial equity workshops with coaching)
Design & facilitation (meetings & processes, public engagement)
Network development (strategy, building, consulting)
Collaborative leadership & equity skills training (public workshops, on-site trainings, learning networks & leadership programs, licensing, training-for-trainers
Organizational development & change

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At IISC, we will work with people and systems to address the symptoms and root causes of the problem so that we can achieve our new vision of living on a healthy planet where people are thriving, valuing their differences, and working together for peace and justice.

We have five organizational goals at IISC in 2021:
1. Human Sustainability: To take care of ourselves and each other so that we can preserve our health and connection as a staff and community culture
2. Financial Sustainability: To keep IISC afloat financially so that we can continue to provide our mission in these critical times
3. Innovative & Efficient Operations: To ensure innovative and efficient operations guided by our values so that IISC can work more seamlessly and manage unprecedented change
4. Activate & Amplify Network: To harness our expanded network of affiliates, board, and partners so that we can meet our goals
5. Innovation & Adaptation: To continue to support innovation through virtual offerings so that we can adapt to and harness this moment

- Assess operations/systems/roles/technology so that we can identify needs for this next stage of innovation
- Invest in platforms, equipment, and training so that we can strengthen our ability to work and deliver in efficient and creative ways online
- Improve tracking of data so that we can make informed and wise organizational decisions
- Streamline reporting and accountability requirements for staff and affiliates so that we can gather information in a timely fashion and make it easy for people to cooperate
- Improve internal communications so that we have a better understanding of timelines and can address competing burdens and adjust capacity
- Improve business development and staffing systems to secure and begin work more efficiently
- Prioritize engagement with other racial justice actors and practitioners so that we can understand the needs of our field and movements and offer our unique gifts and contributions, and build connections for future work.
- Identify and partner with more clients in the "250 and 303 space" (BIPOC clients, movement clients, organizing clients)
- Find capacity and resources to move the book/field guide forward and design a COP around it, particularly for those in the 250/303 space; determine if this is the network of practitioners
- Bring FL4SC and FFRJW online so that we can complete our evolution of moving publics online and expand the capacity of leaders in this moment
- Design a pilot BIPOC offering so that we can support BIPOC leaders and communities at this time
- Pilot a cross-client community of practice (250/303) so that we can equip our clients and community with knowledge and brave actions for racial equity and racial justice
- Offer ARJ public and in house online (consider also a smaller or free offering)
- Expand our resources for external communications so that we have an overall communications strategy and upgrades to our website and e-newsletter, and a consistent graphic design of products and slides

Core Competencies: We have five core competencies that help us to achieve our mission:

• Facilitating difficult and complex conversations
• Building collaborative capacity for social change through training, tools, collaborative design, and decision-making
• Creating processes and building relationships and results that transform people and allow groups to collaborate for social justice
• Catalyzing and deepening racial equity and shared power within systems
• Centering systems thinking, equity, networks, and love.

Racial equity is not new work for us, but IISC focusing on it as the major strategy for the next several years is new. In our early years, IISC facilitated trainings and change processes to foster diversity and inclusion within an organization to enhance collaboration. In some systems, we worked more deeply on structural changes to improve outcomes. We have understood for some time that change needs to happen at fundamental institutional and structural levels, and that to do so requires longer term interventions and attention to how power is shared within institutions. Our ability to focus at the systems level, to transfer skills, and to facilitate change processes makes us unique in the field of racial justice.

Currently, IISC approaches racial equity in two principal ways: through skills training and equity change consulting.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    IISC works with individuals, organizations, networks, and communities that are committing to transformational, long-term change for racial equity

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Group meetings,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Changed our compensation practices to be more equitable.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Interaction Institute for Social Change
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Interaction Institute for Social Change

Board of directors
as of 07/20/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Zenub Kakli

Consultant

Term: 2019 - 2021

Frank Robinson

Partners for a Healthier Community, Inc.

Amy Hosford-Swan

Institute for Healthcare Improvement, Inc.

Barry Rosen

Interaction Associates

Melinda Weekes-Laidlow

Beautiful Ventures

Zenub Kakli

Consultant

Miriam Messinger

Interaction Institute for Social Change

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/20/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Unknown
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data