Agua Para La Vida

aka APLV   |   Berkeley, CA   |  www.aplv.org

Mission

Agua Para La Vida is a non-governmental organization which has been
helping small rural communities in Nicaragua construct their own
drinking water systems since 1987. Originally a California-based group
that provided technical assistance, support and volunteers working
directly with the Nicaraguan communities, it now supports the
development of a local team of technicians capable of taking over all
aspects of the work: selection of projects, design, collaboration with
and training of the beneficiaries, supervision of the construction,
maintenance and hygiene education, and ultimately the ability to secure
its own funding. This indigenous organization, Programa Agua Para La
Vida, has ten full-time Nicaraguan staff and non-profit status.

Ruling year info

1995

Director

Charlie Huizenga

Main address

2311 Webster St

Berkeley, CA 94705 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-3122845

NTEE code info

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Vocational Technical (B30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Nicaragua is the second poorest country in the Western Hemisphere and its rural population, like that of many other developing nations, suffers from contaminated water supplies. Current estimates are that 50% of rural Nicaraguans do not have access to safe drinking water. Although much of Nicaragua is either hilly or mountainous and relatively rich in small springs, the impoverished Nicaraguan government lacks the resources to institute an effective rural program to construct drinking water systems. There is wide agreement among inhabitants, government planners, health workers, and development organizations that the construction of safe drinking water systems is the top development priority. APLV works in the Río Blanco region and is the only active organization providing assistance to rural communities for drinking water systems.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Clean Drinking Water

Since 1987, Agua Para La Vida has been helping rural Nicaraguan communities build their own drinking water and sanitation systems.

Population(s) Served

For its size Nicaragua is incredibly rich in biological diversity. It remains among one of the most biologically rich regions on the planet. Once host to 9,000 different species of trees and plants, Nicaragua has lost approximately fifty percent of its forest cover since 1950. This deforestation, a result of clearing the land for agriculture as well as logging, has had a profound effect on the quality and quantity of water available for drinking. Typically, land owners burn their land seasonally to keep the tropical flora from growing and competing with planted beans and corn, or grass for grazing cattle. The result is a loss of nutrients, a loss of soil stability (landslides are seen all over the Nicaraguan landscape), and a loss of diversity of both plants and animals. Cattle are a major source of income for rural Nicaraguans. However, these animals wade into streams and springs, destroy stream banks, erode the watershed soils, and contaminate the water with their waste.

Each APLV project has a micro-watershed protection component, including reforestation near the spring, protection of the spring, cooperative agreements with nearby landowners and land users, and education for all about the importance of protecting the watershed.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

cornerstone of APLV's sustainability program. APLV Nicaragua trains its own water technicians, turning out a new class of eight or so local experts every two years or so. These technicians come from rural, agricultural areas all over Nicaragua. They grew up in the same kinds of villages that they'll be developing water systems for, and lived the life of the communities where they serve.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Our health team works with all of the APLV communities to provide lectures, workshops, and children’s games that promote health and hygiene. Their work includes school programs, adult programs, and house visits with each family.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people receiving safe drinking water from community systems

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Clean Drinking Water

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people receiving access to sanitation systems

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Community Health and Hygiene Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

- To help small, rural communities of Nicaragua develop and maintain access to safe drinking water
- To preserve and protect the watersheds that provide water to these communities
- To educate these communities about health and hygiene so that they achieve the full benefit from their safe drinking water
- To provide training and education in all aspects of designing, building, and maintaining drinking water systems in order to achieve local autonomy in rural drinking water development

Community-driven Process: Every APLV project begins with a formal, written request from the community. That request is followed up by the community providing various technical information over months on source water flow and related topics, and the community must form a water committee to organize the project.

Project Technical Leadership and Oversight: During the application phase, APLV provides technical and community organization support to the community. Once the project is approved and funded, APLV provides technical leadership, community health workers and organizers, and construction experts to help it to completion.

Sustainability: Because the community builds the water system, and because the community committee overseeing it is trained in ongoing maintenance, water projects can continue in successful operation indefinitely, even without the monitoring and support that APLV provides over the years. An average committee will maintain and repair water system issues with no involvement by APLV.

Built by the Community: The community provides all of the manual labor for the actual water project and for the building of latrines. Each family commits to between 50 and 150 person-days of work on the project, an amazing commitment.

- Strong community-based leadership
- Solid technical and engineering skills
- Dedication to sustainable development

Since 1987, Agua Para La VIda has brought clean water and improved health to over 30,000 people in over 90 communities and has trained more than 25 technicians in our 2 year technical training school.

Financials

Agua Para La Vida
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Agua Para La Vida

Board of directors
as of 11/18/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Charlie Huizenga

Bill Mc Queeney

Charlie Huizenga

Anne Corcos

Bruce Britton

Tom Cunningham

Gilles Corcos

Joe Ramrath

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/18/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data