Educational Institutions

Child Family Health International

  • San Francisco, CA
  • http://www.cfhi.org

Mission Statement

Child Family Health International (CFHI) provides community-based Global Health Education Programs for health science students and institutions. Our unique model fosters reciprocal partnerships and empowerment in local communities - transforming perspectives about self, healing and global citizenship.

Main Programs

  1. Global Health Education Programs
  2. Community Health Projects
  3. Professional Development
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

CFHI programs are in over 20 sites in Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, India, Mexico, and South Africa. Since its founding in 1992, CFHI has helped over 7,000 students from 40 different countries experience global health first-hand.

ruling year

1993

Principal Officer since 2013

Self-reported

Dr. Jessica Evert

Keywords

Self-reported

Children, family, health care, international, health elective, tropical medicine, integrative medicine, nursing, medical, pre-medical, global health, study abroad, India, South Africa, Mexico, Ecuador, Amazon, women's health, global health, medical elective, traditional medicine, socially responsible, Volunteer, internship, asset based community development, medical, san francisco

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Also Known As

CFHI

EIN

94-3145385

 Number

4350215308

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Public Health Program (E70)

International Exchanges (Q23)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

CFHI fosters learning and service that sparks transformational personal change for all involved, working to achieve sustainable solutions in healthcare services and disease prevention while emphasizing respect and understanding across cultures; facilitation of sharing medical resources, knowledge, and experience while giving priority to underserved communities

  HOW WE DO IT

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Global Health Education Programs

CFHI Global Health Education Programs provide students, trainees and institutions with a new perspective on global health challenges, poverty, and low resource communities.  These programs transform notions of pity for impoverished communities into admiration and respect by highlighting local champions, resiliency of cultures, families and communities, as well as the ingenuity, resourcefulness and passion that is found in seemingly 'poor' communities worldwide.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$1,500,000.00

Program 2

Community Health Projects

Projects that originate in the minds and hearts of CFHI partners who are local community members, health practitioners, and others who are dedicated to being change agents in their own communities- CFHI's goal is to support local capacity and passion.  Example projects include the El Alto Center, a day care and skills training center for teen mothers and their young children in La Paz Bolivia, and Catch Them Young, a project in rural India educating young people about healthy life choices and preventive care.

Category

Community Development

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$100,000.00

Program 3

Professional Development

CFHI Professional Development Program allows CFHI partners from low and middle income countries to pursue educational opportunities, degrees, exchanges with like-minded colleagues and foster capacity building at a local level in our partner communities.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$50,000.00

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. Total number of global health education programs offered globally

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
Global Health Education Programs
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

2. Number of countries we offer health education programs in

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
Global Health Education Programs
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

3. Number of students who particiapted in service-learning programs

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
Professional Development
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Child Family Health International challenges the traditional narratives and stereotypes around impoverished settings - focusing on resourcefulness, passion, and ingenuity in settings considered poor. CFHI's goals are several fold. The first is to create life transforming global health experiences for students and trainees. We strive to do so in a way that allows students to learn from local leaders within health care systems around the world. CFHI aims to transform health science students (such as medical, nursing, dental, allied health) so they see the health disparities faced by the world and are moved to be part of the solution at home and abroad. Secondly, CFHI's goal is to support local health care workers through professional development, elevating them as experts in global health, and supporting their passion. The goal is to keep health care workers working in their own communities, and fight against forces of 'brain drain' by providing them opportunities for growth, esteem, and recognition. Thirdly, CFHI's goal is to support community health projects in the communities we work with. These are projects that stem from the passion of our local partners, help the communities where we send students, and provide health services and address social determinants of health.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Our strategies to provide transformative Global Health Education Programs include making sure students are safe and well supported while abroad, adequately prepared for the experience, and reflective about its impacts. We strategically create and maintain partnerships that allow students unique access to health systems, while ensuring appropriate ethical boundaries and not reinforcing North-South power imbalances. With regard to professional development, our strategy is to nurture the professional aspirations of our partners. The strategy behind our community health projects is to support projects which represent asset-based community development, build on existing strengths (the passion and dedication of our local partners being one key strength), as well as create projects which will be sustainable in their own right down the road so we are not breeding dependence.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Our capabilities include having over 25 programs in 7 countries. We are the largest provider of Global Health Education Programs in the US. We have a 20 year track record of partner loyalty, sustainability, program quality and safety. CFHI brings capabilities in both the best practices of international education as well as knowledge in the field of global health and development. This unique spectrum of capabilities uniquely poises CFHI to achieve its goals and make great impacts.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Indicators of success include the volume and diversity of students that CFHI educates. In addition to volume, our indicators of success include impacts reported by participants, partner satisfaction data, as well as independent studies on the impacts of CFHI programs on both participants and local communities. CFHI utilizes multiple indicators to measure success and impact-- including program performance/impacts, measurement of advocacy for ethical/just Global Health Education Programs, sound budgeting and financial sustainability, board engagement and staff satisfaction and professional development.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    CFHI is an NGO in Special Consultative Status with the ECOSOC of the United Nations, a role shared by only 3,000 NGOs in the entire world. We are proud of this accomplishment and continually strive to meet and exceed this reputation through two main goals.

    First CFHI is meeting the demand for global health educational experiences and shaping the future healthcare workforce through programs that inspire students to better understand poverty, healthcare, and their role as professionals and global citizens. Through over 20 educational programs in 7 countries, we provide an average of 700 students each year an opportunity to learn from healthcare experts in underserved communities abroad.

    Secondly CFHI funds several community health projects in our partner communities abroad every year, including some of our featured projects below.

    Confronting Maternal & Infant Mortality: Midwife Training in Mexico- The training in the state of Oaxaca brought together 40 midwives from small villages who lack access to such education. In coordination with the Ministry of Health, midwives received life-saving education, community building amongst themselves, and ties with physicians.

    Reaching the Unreached- provides sex education, substance abuse trainings and workshops to about 2,000 adolescents, aged between 12 and 20. Funding goes to employ a local community health worker and a local project coordinator, in addition to providing vital logistical support and outreach tools with which to attract local speakers. Accomplishments thus far include a rise in marriage age within the community, reduced teenage pregnancies, and improvement in the attendance of antenatal visits and institutional delivery.

    Patti Clinic- In the foothills of Himalayas lies Patti and surrounding villages. This project treats the primary healthcare needs of 28 Himalayan villages. For many this clinic serves as the sole source of healthcare in this area, where villagers may travel 4 to 5 hours on foot seeking care. Since 1999, this project has served over 50,000 patients and in 2012 more than 4,500 people were treated at this facility.

    CFHI continues to expand our reach to meet increasing student demand for health experiences in different areas of the world. We continue to innovate and fundraise in order to increase investment and support for community health projects in the areas where we work. Our track record of more than 22 years running student programs and funding health projects is a testament to our accomplishments and sustainable approach to engaging with global communities. In the future we will continue to lead the global health education field with expanded program themes highlighting the myriad of determinants of health. We would also like to leverage technology in global health engagement as a way to present global health through our partners eyes.
Service Areas

Self-reported

International

CFHI programs are in over 20 sites in Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, India, Mexico, and South Africa. Since its founding in 1992, CFHI has helped over 7,000 students from 40 different countries experience global health first-hand.

Social Media

Blog

Funding Needs

We gratefully accept donations and we encourage the following donations. General: CFHI consistently operates with a very low overhead and many of our loyal donors appreciate this commitment and generously donate to our general fund knowing that their donations make a difference. Scholarships: CFHI is constantly seeks to make its Global Health Education Programs available to more students.  Many donors have supported CFHI's scholarships to make the programs and the associated costs affordable to more students from around the world. Community Health Projects: Individual donors and foundations have supported CFHI's efforts to fund grassroots community health projects. Professional Development for loacal Health Professionals: CFHI responds to requests from local communities to fund and make possible opportunities for professional development to improve delivery of healthcare at the local level.

Accreditations

Charity Navigator

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance

Affiliations + Memberships

Independent Charities of America

photos




External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

Child Family Health International
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Child Family Health International

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Principal Officer

Dr. Jessica Evert

BIO

Jessica Evert MD is a celebrated thought-leader in global health education. She has written and edited multiple volumes and articles on integrating global health curriculum into health science education and best-practices for student global health immersion experiences.  Jessica helped develop the Forum on Education Abroad's Standards for Health-Related International Programs for undergraduate students.  She is a graduate of UCSF Global Health Clinical Scholars Program, which she helped create, and the Ohio State University College of Medicine where she received numerous honors.  Dr. Evert is the past recipient of Global Health Education Consortium's prestigious Christopher Krogh Award for her dedication to underserved populations at home and abroad.  Jessica's research and commentary has been published in multiple peer reviewed journals, featured on NPR and captured by the blogosphere.  Jessica continues to practice and teach hospital-based medicine as a Family Physician in underserved, ethnically diverse settings in San Francisco.  Jessica has participated in global health education, service, and health diplomacy projects in Kenya, Cuba, Guatemala, and Australia.  Her passion is to advocate for the synergy and sustainability that results from approaches between the developed and developing world that emphasize empowerment and investment in local health care workers and community members.  She wholeheartedly believes in the powerful transformation that is possible when young people are exposed to global realities, champions, and just partnership models.

STATEMENT FROM THE Principal Officer

"Child Family Health International (CFHI) is a leader in both the study abroad and global health communities.  We embody asset-based community engagement- in doing so, we transform notions of pity for low-resource communities into admiration and respect.  We are a leading organization changing the hearts and minds of young people and cultivating aspirations to address health disparities at home and abroad. Our Academic Partnerships are opportunities for institutions to expand their offerings for health-related global programs while benefiting from our sound program administration and ethical foundation."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Gunjan Sinha

MetricStream, Inc

Term: Apr 2009 - Apr 2014

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Race & Ethnicity
Sexual Orientation

We do not display sexual orientation information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies
Yes
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
Yes
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
Yes
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan
No
We use other methods to support diversity