Dui Hua Foundation

Advancing Rights Through Dialogue

aka Dui Hua   |   San Francisco, CA   |  www.duihua.org

Mission

Dui Hua is a nonprofit humanitarian organization that brings clemency and better treatment to at-risk detainees through the promotion of universally recognized human rights in well-informed, mutually-respectful dialogue with China. Focusing on political and religious prisoners, juvenile justice, women in prison, and issues in criminal justice, our work rests on the premise that positive change is realized through constructive relationships and exchange. As a testament to the Foundation's work, Dui Hua enjoys special consultative status with the United Nations’ Economic and Social Council and is the only independent NGO focused on human rights in China to have such status.

Ruling year info

1999

Executive Director

Mr. John T. Kamm

Main address

450 Sutter St Ste 900

San Francisco, CA 94108 USA

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EIN

94-3327519

NTEE code info

International Human Rights (Q70)

International Exchanges (Q23)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Political and Religious Prisoners

Dui Hua’s prisoner-advocacy work began as a project to uncover the names of activists jailed during the crackdown on the pro-democracy demonstrations that culminated on June 4, 1989, with the Chinese army’s massacre of protesters in Tiananmen Square. Chinese activists are currently facing the largest crackdown on dissent since the founding of the People's Republic of China. Over the years, Dui Hua’s scope has broadened to encompass all individuals detained for the non-violent expression of their beliefs, including political dissidents, religious practitioners, ethic minorities and petitioners.

Prisoner Lists

One of Dui Hua’s main activities is the preparation of lists for submission to the Chinese government that contain the names of political and religious detainees incarcerated in China. These prisoner lists have played a vital role in human rights diplomacy between China and other countries and organizations.

Drawing on its prisoner database and years of experience in the selection and presentation of cases, Dui Hua produces many lists each year to hand over to the Chinese government - delivered both directly and through third parties. Dui Hua has also created prisoner lists for use by the United Nations and nearly all of the countries holding human rights dialogues with China.

The foundation has produced lists highlighting persons imprisoned in a particular province or prison; individuals convicted of a particular category of crime, and obscure cases essentially unknown both inside and outside of China. As vehicles for expressing concern about individual cases, the lists have contributed directly to better treatment and early release for hundreds of prisoners.

Population(s) Served

Juvenile justice reform became a priority for the Chinese government as unprecedented economic growth and mass migration from rural to urban areas led to a sharp rise in juvenile criminal cases. Delinquency was particularly prevalent among children of migrant workers who were either left behind or taken to the cities where they were denied access to schooling and other social benefits. Working the Supreme People’s Court, Dui Hua has organized and presented five expert exchanges between American and Chinese legal practitioners on juvenile justice.

Given that the global population of juvenile offenders has historically been dominated by young men, policies and practices in the juvenile justice system, as well as related research on offending, have all focused on the behavior, treatment and outcomes for male offenders. As a result, there is a relative lack of knowledge about young female offenders. Yet experts see long-term consequences for girl offenders that are often more pronounced than those for boys, with effects extending to the next generation.

In 2020, Dui Hua will present Girls in Conflict with the Law: An International Symposium. This will be the Foundation's sixth exchange on juvenile justice, presented this time in Hong Kong. The first event of its kind, this symposium will bring together 25 leading experts and practitioners from around the world for a 3-day exchange on the unique challenges related to protecting girls in conflict with the law.

Population(s) Served

Women are the world’s fastest-growing prisoner demographic, estimated to account for between 2 and 10 percent of national prison populations. In China, more than 5 percent of individuals in prisons run by the Ministry of Justice are women, and the number of incarcerated women is growing faster than that of incarcerated men. If the rate of growth registered in 2009 is maintained, China’s prisons will hold nearly 100,000 women prisoners by the middle of 2012.

In December 2010, the United Nations introduced a framework for gender-specific corrections by passing Rules for the Treatment of Women Prisoners and Non-Custodial Measures for Women Offenders (the Bangkok Rules). Designed to meet the common physical and psychological needs of women in penal systems built for men, these rules form an integral part of women’s rights advocacy.

To improve the treatment of women detainees, Dui Hua aims to promote the adoption of the Bangkok Rules through dialogue and exchange. In February 2014, Dui Hua organized an international symposium on women in prison and the Bangkok Rules, which brought together 25 expert presenters from nine countries for three days of discussions on the issues facing women in conflict with the law. China represented the largest contingent, and international bodies such as the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the International Committee of the Red Cross were also in attendance.

Population(s) Served

When there is little presumption of innocence and much support for retributive justice, everyone in conflict with the law is at risk. In order to protect internationally recognized human rights and ensure the humanitarian treatment of people at odds with the law, Dui Hua focuses on criminal justice issues ranging from criminal procedures to capital punishment.

Additionally, Dui Hua has actively promotes death penalty reform in China. Executive Director John Kamm regularly discusses death penalty reform in direct dialogue with members of China’s judiciary and also provides consultation to foreign governments, the United Nations, and nongovernmental organizations.

Dui Hua regularly publishes estimates of the number of executions in China, while the actual number remains a state secret. The number of executions has dropped significantly since the Supreme People’s Court regained the power to review all death sentences in 2007.

Through independent research and consultations from informed sources, Dui Hua estimates that there were 2,000 applications of the death penalty in China in 2016, 2,200 applications in 2017 and 2,000 applications in 2018. There is a very slight downward trend in the number of applications of the death penalty since 2012 but this has likely been offset by an uptick in death sentences handed down during the anti-terrorism campaign in Xinjiang and the nationwide campaign against corruption.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Financials

Dui Hua Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Dui Hua Foundation

Board of directors
as of 4/29/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

John Kamm

The Dui Hua Foundation

Term: 2019 - 2020

Magdalen Yum

Merrill Lynch Asian U.S. Complex

Linda Ziglar

Harold Furman

The Furman Group, Inc.

William Simon

Kura Holdings LLC

Thomas Gorman

CCI Asia-Pacific Ltd.

William McCahill

John Kamm

The Dui Hua Foundation

Michael McCune

Gartner

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No