Human Services

WomenShelter of Long Beach

Long Beach, CA

Mission

The mission of WomenShelter of Long Beach is to eliminate domestic violence through compassionate intervention, education and personal empowerment.

WSLB serves the greater Long Beach area and Los Angeles County.

WomenShelter of Long Beach prohibits discrimination in all of its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital or family status.

Notes from the Nonprofit

WSLB's vision is to be recognized as a premier organization that fosters a community free from domestic violence. Due to our efforts, families, individuals and future generations will have the awareness, tools, education, and support to form and maintain violence-free relationships. WSLB will inspire others to eliminate domestic violence in their communities.

Ruling Year

1937

Executive Director

Mary Ellen Mitchell

Main Address

4201 Long Beach Blvd., Suite 102

Long Beach, CA 90807 USA

Keywords

domestic violence, intimate partner violence, emergency shelter, crisis intervention, child & youth counseling, legal advocacy, health assessment & education, domestic violence awareness outreach

EIN

95-1644058

 Number

3439775297

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Other Housing, Shelter N.E.C. (L99)

Other Youth Development N.E.C. (O99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

Domestic violence is a pervasive social and health problem: 25% of women and 7.6% of men experience physical violence and sexual assault by a partner (National Violence Against Women Survey); it's the leading cause of injury, homelessness, and poverty for women (National Alliance to End Homelessness; 75% of DV deaths occur from escape attempts. DV is not a one-time incident but a pattern of coercive and abusive behaviors; the number of victimizations far exceeds the number of victims. Many have been kept in isolation and lack employment and social skills. Most clients have low/very low income levels; may be immigrants facing unique challenges and cultural barriers to seeking assistance.

Two overarching goals drive all programming at WSLB: to facilitate clients' self-sufficiency, empowerment, and well-being; and to prevent recidivism of domestic violence through community outreach and education.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Emergency shelter & domestic violence awareness outreach

Building Healthy Relationships

Where we workNew!

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of briefings or presentations held

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Emergency shelter & domestic violence awareness outreach

Context notes

Community domestic violence awareness and prevention presentations, include "Building Healthy Relationships" in middle and high schools and college campuses.

Number of individuals attending briefings and presentations

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Related program

Building Healthy Relationships

Context notes

Domestic violence awareness and prevention presentations, including "Building Healthy Relationships" in middle and high schools and college campuses.

Number of participants counseled

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Context notes

Adults and children receive counseling at the WSLB confidential emergency shelter and the walk-jn Domestic Violence Resource Center.

Number of participants reporting change in behavior or cessation of activity

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Context notes

Adults and children measured for behavior criteria after counseling at WSLB emergency shelter and walk-in Domestic Violence Resource Center.

Number of clients served

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Context notes

Victims of domestic violence and their children receiving direct services at WSLB emergency shelter and the walk-in Domestic Violence Resource Center

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed social skills (e.g., interpersonal communication, conflict resolution)

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Context notes

Children and youth after completing counseling at WSLB emergency shelter and Domestic Violence Resource Center.

Number of youth who identify, manage, and appropriately express emotions and behaviors

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Context notes

Children and youth after completing counseling at WSLB emergency shelter and Domestic Violence Resource Center.

Number of direct care staff who received training in trauma informed care

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Context notes

All staff who deliver direct services to victims of domestic violence and their children at the WSLB shelter and the Domestic Violence Resource Center must complete trauma-informed training.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

Within the two overarching goals stated above, lies the heart of the work WSLB does to develop strategies that are adopted by domestic violence victims to aim them at a safe and healthy violence-free life. We address all the issues of a victim with trauma-informed care. There are so many barriers for victims to get help and our model eliminates many of these.by removing as many barriers as possible to leaving a dangerous home, providing opportunities for them to stop the violent cycle. WSLB is committed to making the ongoing services and programs available at no charge to the victims of domestic violence in the greater Long Beach community. We must make escape from a life-threatening situation a safe option for all victims in need. Domestic violence knows no economic or social divide. Our clientele is primarily at or below poverty level. They have nowhere else to turn for safety for themselves and their children.

Fleeing a violent home is a courageous act. The confidential shelter ensures immediate safety, security, legal advocacy, medical and nutritional needs, and services to promote long-term self-sufficiency, empowerment and well being. Rebuilding a life is a complex process. Health and safety of victims and their children is a priority. Counselors assist them in creating a viable safety plan. Adults and children are given a health assessment and referrals to appropriate healthcare partners. Legal needs are determined and the WSLB Legal Advocate assists in issues like restraining orders, child custody, and more. Once safe, WSLB offers a range of services and programs: individual and peer counseling; life skill and parenting classes; meditation, yoga and exercise classes; sewing classes; art therapy; and more. WSLB is piloting a collaboration with spcaLA called the Compassion & Communication Workshop: This pilot program is a partnership between a Long Beach animal shelter, spcaLA and WomenShelter of Long Beach. The goal of the program is to help clients, especially the children, develop their communication skills while expanding other valuable life skills such as patience, understanding, trust, and compassion. Parent and child will work with a trainer and train a puppy that has experienced a similar tragic life. Clients will feel a sense of accomplishment and fulfillment knowing that they are improving the animal's life. Our Youth counselors work with children who are victims or witnesses to violence using art therapies that enable expression of emotions hidden and unexpressed. WSLB is committed to prevention as a powerful tool in stopping the cycle of violence, and our youth, with guidance, can be the “super-powers" of prevention. A national study found nearly 50% of youth who received prevention education used the information to help themselves or a friend and 88% were more likely to discuss dating relationships with parents or trusted adults; disclosing violence or potentially dangerous dating abuse. We have a successful program making presentations in schools on building healthy relationships and avoiding dangerous behavior. Last year, we made 81 presentations in middle and high schools, and college campuses, reaching close to 2,500 students. WSLB is developing curriculum tools that resonate with teens to communicate a message of empowerment in their life choices. Studies show that 80% of a child's brain is developed by 3 years. A child brought up in a violent home is either a witness or a victim. Dangerous behavior is modeled for the child, and without intervention, many children will become victims or batterers, unaware their interactions are harmful. Our curriculum teaches young people to recognize the “red flags" of dangerous behavior and understand the signs of healthy relationships as they make decisions on relationship building and independence that will affect the rest of their lives.

WSLB is celebrating its 40th year of serving victims of domestic violence and their children in greater Long Beach. Our organization is committed to delivering the highest quality and most effective programs and services available. With this commitment comes the responsibility to be informed on new thought and methodology in the field. Our counselor advocates attend pertinent training and conferences. A segment of our monthly all-staff meetings is devoted to a presentation by an expert in one of the many areas of DV. Examples are trauma-informed care and cultural competency, The WSLB Board Directors and leadership staff have been attending the year-long "Developing Development" training by Executive Service Corps through a scholarship funded by the generosity and wisdom of the John Gogian Family Foundation. Education and improved fundraising skills strengthen our organization's capacity to stop the cycle of violence.

WSLB has established outcomes to measure our success for adults and children participating in our programs and services. WSLB practices trauma-informed care, not shaming and blaming, to help victims move toward empowerment, transitional housing, and a life free of violence. On arrival, they are given an intake interview. For adults, this includes assessing their legal and health needs, and the level of confidence in their abilities. They have a correlating exit interview on departure. The counselor creates a baseline for children to measure progress in social interaction and empowerment in addition to a health assessment.
ADULT SERVICES OBJECTIVES:
o Client and WSLB counselor complete an intake survey and individual assessment to determine barriers to success
o They develop and implement an individual safety/case management plan
o Client regularly attends various educational sessions (domestic violence awareness and understanding, life skills, healthy parenting, and more)
o Client regularly attends individual and group counseling meetings
o Client accesses community agencies referred by WSLB
WSLB anticipates that more than 50% of the individuals served in a performance year will achieve their milestone goals.
CHILDREN & YOUTH SERVICES OBJECTIVES:
WSLB counselors utilize art and performance therapy in group sessions to help children recognize negative behavior and safely express fear, anger and confusion. This leads to positive behavior that comes with empowerment.
o Reduction in stress-related aggressive behaviors
o Improvement in social development, following routines, establishing eye contact, and expressing affection spontaneously
o Learn to identify feelings in self and others using age-appropriate vocabulary; and show the capacity to express a range of emotions, including joy, anger, fear, curiosity, frustration, and affection.
Over 80% of children are expected to reach these objectives.
DV AWARENESS & PREVENTION PROGRAMS:
In the last fiscal year, WSLB Advocates made more than 80 prevention presentations in area schools and civic groups, reaching 2500 students.

WSLB maintains accurate statistical and outcome data and the evaluation process provides valuable information on the effectiveness of both the program and staff.

In Fiscal Year 2016 - 2017, all of WSLB's programs and services combined touched over 5,000 people in our community. This included: close to 7,000 counseling sessions; close to 3,000 bed-nights at Shelter; over 1,000 crisis hotline calls; and putting on 46 community Health Fairs and awareness events.

An Angel Donor has purchased a new shelter for WSLB! Their generosity is unprecedented and will bring the quality of life for our victims and staff who care for them to the next level. The building is in a safe residential neighborhood near a public park and public transportation. All the rooms will be accessible, unlike our existing situation.Our current shelter is in a declining area and the 1920s building is in disrepair. It will take some time for the new building to be remodeled, but it will be a welcoming beacon on our horizon.

To meet the needs of our community, after the new shelter is completed and operating (2018-19), we will renovate the old shelter and have the option (most need) to continue as a temporary shelter or become transitional housing.

External Reviews

Financials

WomenShelter of Long Beach

Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

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FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2017 and 2016
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2017 and 2016
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to see what's included.

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Not Applicable

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

Race & Ethnicity

Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members, Senior Staff, Full-Time Staff and Part-Time Staff.

Disability

Diversity Strategies

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We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
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We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
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We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
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We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
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We have a diversity committee in place
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We have a diversity manager in place
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We have a diversity plan
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We use other methods to support diversity