Chinatown Service Center

THRIVING LIVES AND EMPOWERING THE COMMUNITY

Los Angeles, CA   |  www.cscla.org

Mission

To provide outstanding services and advocacy that promote better quality of life and equal opportunity for immigrants and other communities.

Notes from the nonprofit

Please contact our organization directly for any questions!

Ruling year info

1975

CEO

Mr. Peter Ng

Main address

767 N. Hill Street Suite 400

Los Angeles, CA 90012 USA

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EIN

95-2918844

NTEE code info

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

Community Health Systems (E21)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CSC's service area population has several significant health status indicators correlated with morbidity and mortality when compared to the county, state, and/or nation. Identified health disparities include: Diabetes, Cardiovasular Disease, Stroke, Cancer, Liver Disease, teen bith rates, obesity, and mental health conditions. Some of the determining factors of the health of people in CSC’s community include insurance, poverty, education, access to providers, and housing insecurity, etc. Overall, CSC seeks to serve the safety-net population, and focuses on offering culturally appropriate care to each of its patients at each of its sites. Recognizing that access to care is most critical to maintaining good health, CSC strives to hire bilingual providers and support staff to ensure care is provided with the utmost of cultural and linguistic competency to their diverse patient population.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Health and Social Service

CSC is a multi-service community-based organization serving Los Angeles for more than 50 years. Our organization is divided into four departments, which are outlined below, along with the services provided within each department.

a) Social Services - senior services, welfare and benefit enrollments, case management, assistance/ interpretation of government forms, workshops, and linkage to services for needs such as legal, housing, employment, family, in-home assistance, or education;
b) Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) Clinics - comprehensive primary care, behavioral health care, and dental care to patients of all ages
c) Youth Services - after school programs, high school internships, youth council, college prep, volunteer opportunities, workshops, high school advising, campus tours, and tutoring;
d) Community Economic Development, - small business training and consultation, workshops, networking, financial management program, tax preparation assistance, financial literacy

Population(s) Served
People of Asian descent
Immigrants and migrants

Where we work

Accreditations

Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) 2007

Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) 2021

Awards

National Quality Leader 2020

HRSA

Health Center Quality Leader 2020

HRSA

Health Disparity Reducer 2020

HRSA

Access Enhancer 2020

HRSA

Advancing HIT for Quality 2020

HRSA

Advancing HIT for Quality 2021

HRSA

COVID-19 Testing 2021

HRSA

COVID-19 Vaccinations 2021

HRSA

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clinic sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Asian descent, Low-income people, Immigrants, Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Health and Social Service

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of patient visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, People of Asian descent, People of Latin American descent, Low-income people

Related Program

Health and Social Service

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goals that the health center will work to achieve over the next several years include:

GOALS
1 ACCESS AND CONTINUOUS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT
Increase the number of unique patients and continue to enhance clinical and operational
quality and efficiency.

2 FINANCIAL STABILITY
Continue to improve financial results and ensure financial sustainability.

3 DEVELOPMENT AND INFRASTRUCTURE
Increase the community footprint and improve facilities and systems.

4 MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS
Increase outreach & enrollment and community awareness.

5 WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT
Build a skilled and engaged workforce.

6 GOVERNANCE
Enhance board development and effectiveness.

With our uploaded Strategic Plan, see Table 3 (starting on page 34) for a list of the objectives and activities related to each of the health center’s strategic goals. In the plan, we outline specific strageies for achieving each of our objectives.

In 2022, CSC has a workforce numbering more than 180 employees. Our leadership is extremely well-connected and effective. We utilize a number of consultants to assist in our expansion/growth, as well. Within the organization, there is less staff turn-over than other similar organizations. CSC is adaptable, dedicated, and competent. These characteristics are our primary capability allowing for CSC to meet our current and future goals.

CSC is an integral part of the safety net within its service area, providing comprehensive and costeffective services in a manner that meets each patient’s individual needs, regardless of ability to pay,
while also addressing the overall needs of the communities it serves. Ongoing changes in the health
care environment will require CSC to continue to adapt in order to thrive and take advantage of new
opportunities. This Strategic Plan provides the framework for guiding the health center over the next
several years. With leadership from its engaged Board of Directors and Management Team, CSC will
build upon its accomplishments that have made it a pillar of the community.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Founded in 1971, Chinatown Service Center (CSC) is one of the largest community-based, Chinese- American organizations in Southern California. As a multi-service, non-profit community health center with Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) designation, we care for the underserved at our five (5) clinic sites across Los Angeles (LA) County, California. At these sites, we provide health, dental, behavioral health to diverse, immigrant, limited English speaking, low-income, homeless, and previously incarcerated populations. The vast majority of our patient population identify as non-White, with the largest racial/ethnic groups served being Asian/Pacific Islander, followed by Hispanic individuals.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Meetings with other community-based organizations that serve a similar populations,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We conduct a need assessment every three years as part of CSC's Quality Improvement process, which includes feedback from those we serve. We learned that our service area had needs around the opioid crisis. Upon further investigation, secondary data research revealed that in our service area, there were 8,910 buprenorphine prescriptions provided to 1,834 individuals to treat their Opioid Use Disorder (OUD). Our Need Assessment indicated that only 6.7% of those with OUD in our service area were engaged in formal Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) services. One this need was identified and verified, CSC sought funding for a MAT program, with full support of leadership and the Board. In 2021, we were awarded federal funding to formalize and promote a MAT program at CSC.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    All services at CSC are provided from a patient-centered approach. To solidify this commitment, CSC has earned recognized as a Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH). The PCMH is a care model that promotes care coordination and communication in order to provide better care and outcomes to patients. The National Center for Quality Assurance (NCQA) PCMH recognition model is the most widely adopted model in the country for transforming health centers into Patient-Centered Medical Homes. Further, our organization offers Integrated Care, as such, CSC’s services are fully integrated and co-located in a “one stop shop.” This model ensures clients will receive whatever services are needed to meet the client need. All treatment plans and goals are completed collaboratively with our patients.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Chinatown Service Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Chinatown Service Center

Board of directors
as of 04/06/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Henry Kwong

Universal Funeral Group

Term: 2020 - 2022

Gloria Tang

First Republic Bank

Henry Kwong

Universal Funeral Group

Teodoro Ramirez

Financial Consultant

Vinh Ngo

Bank of America

Roy Jasso

Wells Fargo Bank (Retired)

Bee Hsu

Community Leader

Simone Liu

Wells Fargo Advisors

Joseph Chang

San Marino Unified School District's Governing Board

Wilson Tang

Cathay Bank

Lawrence Tam

AT&T

Heidi Kwok

Heidi Kwok, CPA

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/28/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/28/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.