Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy

Justice in Aging

  • Washington, DC
  • www.justiceinaging.org

Mission Statement

Justice in Aging is a national organization that uses the power of law to fight senior poverty by securing access to affordable health care, economic security, and the courts for older adults with limited resources. Since 1972 we've focused our efforts primarily on populations that have traditionally lacked legal protection such as women, people of color, LGBT individuals, and people with limited English proficiency.

Main Programs

  1. Health Care
  2. Economic Security
  3. Litigation
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

We have offices in both Oakland and Los Angeles, CA as well as in the District of Columbia.

ruling year

1977

Executive Director

Self-reported

Kevin Prindiville

Keywords

Self-reported

CA

Notes from the Nonprofit

We lead efforts to shine a light on senior poverty. In 2014, we have been able to convince the US Senate to have a hearing specifically on the topic. We continue to use blogs and social media to educate policymakers, advocates and others that the problem persists and needs solving.

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Also Known As

NSCLC

EIN

95-3132674

 Number

2552516080

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (W01)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

As the only national organization focused on fighting senior poverty, Justice in Aging's unique model of impact magnifies our work and legal expertise to improve the lives of millions of older Americans. We break down barriers to accessing health care and protect and strengthen programs that provide seniors with the health care and economic security benefits they need to live healthy lives of dignity.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Health Care

We use our legal expertise on the health care programs low-income seniors rely on to train thousands of advocates a year, advocate for better policies at the local and national level, and file impact litigation to ensure programs are administered without discrimination and unnecessary barriers.

Category

Population(s) Served

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Female Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Budget

$1,019,005.00

Program 2

Economic Security

ustice in Aging uses our unique model of advocate education, federal and state advocacy, and impact litigation to preserve, strengthen, expand and improve income support programs such as Social Security and Supplemental Security Income.

Category

Population(s) Served

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$322,405.00

Program 3

Litigation

Justice in Aging uses litigation to ensure that poor seniors have access to the courts to defend their rights.

Category

Population(s) Served

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Adults

Budget

$105,665.00

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    We fight senior poverty so that every senior will have the opportunity to age in dignity.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Justice in Aging provides training and materials to thousands of direct service advocates a year, engages in advocacy at the local and national level, and utilizes impact litigation to advance the rights of low-income older Americans.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Justice in Aging attorneys possess unique legal expertise in the programs, systems, and services that low-income older adults rely on. We use our legal knowledge to fight for the rights of poor seniors.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Justice in Aging makes progress on many fronts: We measure our progress by court cases won, dollars in benefits returned to seniors, policies changed, legislation introduced, and numbers of direct service legal and other advocates trained.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    In the 45 years we've been fighting senior poverty, we've won back billions of dollars in benefits for poor seniors, prevented harmful legislation from being passed, ensured that millions had access to the health care and long-term services they need to age in dignity and health, provided thousands of hours of free legal trainings and expertise to tens of thousands of advocates who have helped countless individuals access the benefits they are entitled to, appeal bad agency decisions, and more.
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

We have offices in both Oakland and Los Angeles, CA as well as in the District of Columbia.

Social Media

Blog

Funding Needs

NSCLC has an ongoing need to support its health care, economic security programs. We rely on private foundations, government and individual donors to allow us to continue protecting the rights of low income older adults.

Accreditations

Videos

External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

JUSTICE IN AGING
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Justice in Aging

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Executive Director

Kevin Prindiville

BIO

Executive Director Kevin Prindiville started as a Staff Attorney at NSCLC's Oakland office in 2006 and served as Deputy Director from 2011-13. He has gained national prominence through promoting consumer protection of people who have both Medicare and Medicaid (dual eligibles). Prindiville currently leads a campaign to build awareness of senior poverty and its effects. He also leads several national and California-focused grant-sponsored projects as many states seek to move millions of low-income elderly and people with disabilities into managed care plans. The author of several substantive reports and briefs, he frequently testifies before legislators, presents at national conferences and works closely with both federal and state regulatory agencies to accomplish NSCLC goals. He also is quoted often in national and California media.

Prior to joining NSCLC, Prindiville worked as a staff attorney at the Pennsylvania Health Law Project in Philadelphia where he represented low-income individuals having trouble obtaining health care. He is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Law School and the University of California, San Diego. Prindiville is admitted to the California Bar.

STATEMENT FROM THE Executive Director

"NSCLC exists as the one national organization uniquely focused on advocating for the elderly poor. As an organization, we give
poor seniors a voice in policy circles, in federal and state government agencies and in the courts.Through our advocacy we protect their access to quality health care and economic security. We advocate on the state and federal level, educate thousands of legal services and other advocates around the nation, and when necessary, use our legal might in court to fight for the rights of our most vulnerable seniors."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Phyllis J. Holmen

Georgia Legal Services

Term: 2016 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?