EL CENTRO DE AMISTAD INC

Empowering lives today for a better tomorrow

aka ECDA, E.C.D.A.   |   SAN FERNANDO, CA   |  www.elcentrodeamistad.org

Mission

El Centro de Amistad, Inc., is a multilingual, cross cultural organization providing a comprehensive range of mental health services, anticipating the ever-changing needs of families and individuals in the San Fernando Valley. El Centro de Amistad, Inc. is committed to assisting children, adults and families.

Ruling year info

1985

Executive Director

Mrs. Tamika Farr

Associate Director

Mrs. Tania Fallert

Main address

566 S. BRAND BLVD

SAN FERNANDO, CA 91340 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-3498639

NTEE code info

Community Mental Health Center (F32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

ECDA

ECDA is concerned about the lack of mental health and social services to the low-income residents of the San Fernando Valley. It administers a comprehensive range of services, including individual, family and group therapy, referral services, case management, medication support, after school tutoring and homework assistance, computer literacy classes, arts and crafts, recreational activities, community mobilization and mentoring. El Centro de Amistad also provides information and referral services as needed by its clients.

El Centro de Amistad?s programs and services are particularly suited to the Latino population of the greater San Fernando Valley. The main goal at ECDA is to reduce risk factors that lead to violence, school failure, gang affiliation, and child abuse.

Population(s) Served

The Adult Outpatient Program provides ongoing adult mental health (individual, family and group therapy, and rehabilitation), case management and medication support services to adults who are chronically mentally ill and on Med-Cal or uninsured. The goal of these services is to stabilize clients and link them to community resources to develop appropriate transitional plans to maintain clients in the community. Services range for individuals from aged 26 – 59 and may be either short-term or long term.

Population(s) Served

The CalWORKS Program provides intensive treatment; therapy (individual, family and group), case management, medication support and outreach to CalWORKS recipients referred through Department of Social Services (DPSS) GAIN office. The main focus of the Program is to resolve issues that are barriers to employment. Participants are all adult individuals with persistent or severe mental health disabilities to individuals with mild to acute emotional problems, such as anxiety or situational depression. The CalWORKS team works tirelessly to develop treatment plans that focus on interventions to reduce symptoms and strategies to develop job skills. CalWORKS recipients have obtained a number of jobs through mentorship from their employment specialist.

Population(s) Served

The Children’s Outpatient Program treats children with a wide range of mental health disorders; between the ages of 0-21 whom are uninsured or have Medi-Cal. Services may be provided in the clinic, school or field in order to meet the needs of the client. ECDA utilizes a multi-disciplinary treatment approach to diminish impairments and barriers that are causing difficulties in the home, school or community. Services include individual and family therapy, rehabilitative services, case management and medication support. Services focus on improving daily living skills and healthy social development.

Population(s) Served

FCCS services broadens our reach by providing services for Medi-Cal and uninsured adults between the ages of 26-59 and youth between the ages of 10 -15. Many FCCS clients have mental health and medical issues that are barriers to attending treatment sessions consistently. To address these barriers, the FCCS Program provides mental health services in various non-traditional settings such as the client’s home, client’s place of employment and community centers or parks. The focus of the FCCS Program is on helping clients increase their practical living skills and effectively deal with daily activities and challenges.

Population(s) Served

The MAT Program is a collaborative program between the Los Angeles Department of Mental Health (LADMH) and the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS). Referrals are filtered through DCFS and provided to the Agency and assigned to an Agency MAT Assessor. The children (ages birth – 17) referred through the MAT program have been removed from their home environment and placed in foster care due to abuse or neglect. Upon intake, The MAT Assessor conducts a comprehensive and detailed assessment on the child. Many of the children have experienced trauma and other symptoms in relation to the detention. The main goals are to identify the child’s current psychological/social-environment/emotional functioning and the needs and resources the child/family will need in order to support stabilization and functioning in the home, community and school.

Population(s) Served

Case Management assists with linkage and support services to access medical, educational, social, vocational, rehabilitative services and community resources.

Population(s) Served

Psychiatric medication evaluation and monitoring services may be provided in conjunction with psychotherapy.

Population(s) Served

The FPP is a strength-based, collaborative program aimed at helping families who are referred from the DCFS to identify and build upon existing strengths; resolve child safety concerns; advocate for their children at school and in other public settings; and expand, or establish, the family’s connection to resources and supports in the community. One of the primary goals of the FPP is increased family self-sufficiency and to reduce reliance upon public agencies.

The FPP offers numerous services, including, but not limited to, in-home outreach counseling and case management, parent training, counseling, teaching and demonstrating homemaking to assist families in managing a household, and creating a financial budget. We offer child-focused activities offered to children while their caregivers are participating in a support services, e.g., counseling. In addition, we practice substitute adult role modeling, in which a mentor is paired with a child or youth to support their social, educational and recreational dreams. Transportation of the family to and from their service activities are provided too.

Population(s) Served

The intent of PEI programs is to engage individuals before the development of serious mental illness or emotional disturbance. In addition, this program aims to alleviate the need for additional or extended mental health treatment by facilitating access to services and supports at the earliest signs of mental health struggles.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

EL CENTRO DE AMISTAD INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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EL CENTRO DE AMISTAD INC

Board of directors
as of 06/12/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Ismael Aguila


Board co-chair

Mrs. Danitza Pantoja

Doug Barnett

Jerry Fox

Rich Golisch

Irene Smerigan

David Moreno

Danitza Pantoja

Ismael Aguila

Justin Grooms

Charlene Gramling

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/12/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data