1736 Family Crisis Center

saving lives since 1972

Los Angeles, CA   |  www.1736familycrisiscenter.org

Mission

The mission of 1736 Family Crisis Center is to comprehensively help children, women, men and families through crisis circumstances, including domestic violence, homelessness, abuse, neglect, poverty, substance use, post-traumatic stress disorder, and distress, and to improve their prospects for long-term housing, safety, survival, financial stability, and success.

Ruling year info

1986

CEO and Executive Director

Ms. Carol Adelkoff

Main address

2116 Arlington Avenue Suite 200

Los Angeles, CA 90018 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-3989251

NTEE code info

Family Services (P40)

Low-Cost Temporary Housing (includes Youth Hostels) (L40)

Military/Veterans' Organizations (W30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The homeless population in the greater Los Angeles area continues to grow at an alarming rate. On any given night in Los Angeles County, there are 53,195 people experiencing homelessness, representing a 23% increase when compared to the prior year. Moreover, the area has seen an increase in youth/young adults (61%) and families (29%) among the ranks of the homeless. Numbers of homeless Veterans and people reporting a life-time experience with domestic violence and those fleeing domestic violence and human trafficking have also increased; the majority of these remaining unsheltered, living in cars or on the streets in unsafe circumstances. (LA Homeless Count, 2018) As the demand for immediate shelter and long-term affordable housing remains high, the agency works to meet the needs of extremely vulnerable and often injured clientele – children, families, Veterans – who are facing life-threatening circumstances, including domestic violence, child abuse, sex trafficking, and homelessness.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Domestic Violence Program

The Domestic Violence program includes four confidential, 24-hour shelters (serving adults and their children ages birth through 17 and single women), five suicide/crisis hotlines, and three Community Service Centers that provide legal assistance, employment services, case management, and mental health care to survivors. The shelter component provides emergency and longer term transitional shelter, coupled with individualized, wraparound professional care, including legal, employment, housing and case management services. All services are provided free of charge in English and Spanish.

Population(s) Served
Families
Women and girls

Licensed by the California Community Care Licensing Division, the Emergency Youth Shelter program addresses the immediate critical needs of homeless, runaway and abandoned boys and girls (ages 10-17) who are often victims of extreme trauma (violence at home, sex trafficking, physical assault on the streets, etc.). Central program goals are to build client coping skills and help vulnerable youth return home when appropriate, or find stable alternative living arrangements when their home is not safe. Shelter staff work with youth and their families to help each youngster develop the skills and networks of support that will lead them on paths toward safety and stability. Annually the program provides emergency shelter and supportive services to approximately 125 homeless and runaway youth, and 24-hr. crisis hotline services, outpatient care, referrals and outreach services to approximately 1,000 youth and their families.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Children and youth

The program, which is based in Santa Ana, assists military Veterans who are homeless or at imminent risk of homelessness. The overarching goal is to assist Veterans and their families achieve, or return to, housing stability and self-sufficiency, and to fill critical gaps in services by providing assistance that is not typically offered by other (veteran) programs in the county. Unlike traditional VA programs, for example, which are restricted to the Veteran herself/himself and are still largely designed for, and focused on the needs of, single male Veterans, the Veteran Families Program provides services (case management, child care, employment assistance) to female veterans as well as the children and spouses of Veterans. The program also provides flexible, temporary financial assistance to help struggling Veteran families overcome obstacles to housing stability, such as obtaining affordable child care, repairing a broken car necessary to maintain one's employment, and paying security and utility deposits on new rental units. Services are targeted to three high-risk subgroups: 1) households whose incomes are 30% and below Area Median Income; 2) veterans with minor children; and 3) post 9/11 veterans.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Families

The program, which is based in Wilmington, assists military Veterans who are homeless or at imminent risk of homelessness. The overarching goal is to assist Veterans and their families achieve, or return to, housing stability and self-sufficiency, and to fill critical gaps in services by providing assistance that is not typically offered by other (veteran) programs in the county. Unlike traditional VA programs, for example, which are restricted to the Veteran herself/himself and are still largely designed for, and focused on the needs of, single male Veterans, the Veteran Families Program provides services (case management, child care, employment assistance) to female veterans as well as the children and spouses of Veterans. The program also provides flexible, temporary financial assistance to help struggling Veteran families overcome obstacles to housing stability, such as obtaining affordable child care, repairing a broken car necessary to maintain one's employment, and paying security and utility deposits on new rental units. Services are targeted to three high-risk subgroups: 1) households whose incomes are 30% and below Area Median Income; 2) veterans with minor children; and 3) post 9/11 veterans.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Families

Where we work

Awards

Four Star Community Service Award 2012

Community Action Board (City of Los Angeles)

Four Star Community Service Award 2013

Community Action Board (City of Los Angeles)

Affiliations & memberships

OC Partnership 2013

OC Partnership 2014

OC Partnership 2015

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The mission of 1736 Family Center is to comprehensively help children, women, men, and families through crisis circumstances, including domestic violence, homelessness, poverty, and post-traumatic stress disorder, improving their prospects for long-term housing, financial stability, and success.

In support of its mission, the agency provides comprehensive residential, out-patient and supportive services for victims of domestic violence and human trafficking, homeless youth, Veterans, and other low-income community members to effect long-term positive results (including safety and stability) that greatly improve the quality of their lives. Program components address clients' immediate needs (such as safe shelter, food, clothing, crisis counseling, legal assistance) as well as provide transitional support (such as job development, life skills training, financial literacy training, in-house legal services, housing assistance) to assist them in sustaining long-term stability and success.

1736 FCC proactively addresses the needs of its at-risk clientele through effective programming and services: 1.) 24-hour crisis hotlines, safe shelter for victims of all ages, outreach, and supportive services, linkages to next-step housing, counseling, and family reunification; 2.) Rapid re-housing programs for abuse survivors, homeless Veterans, individuals and families that offer access to permanent housing; 3.) Legal services that helps victims of abuse and human trafficking; 4.) Employment services that provide job development and placement for homeless and low-income community members; and 5.) Out-patient clinics that offer mental health therapy, case management, legal and other services for low-income individuals, children, and families. Services are free, low-barrier, and culturally competent. Our sites and services have been strategically developed and located in order to fill community gaps and address the needs of historically underserved areas and populations.

1736 Family Crisis Center has 30 dedicated facilities and service locations throughout Los Angeles and Orange Counties. These sites include: administrative headquarters; confidentially-located domestic violence and homeless youth shelters; mental health and legal clinics; hotline centers; financial and job/skill training sites; a co-located police-response program; and homeless outreach/drop-in/service centers for Veterans, youth, human trafficking victims, and other crime victims.

The agency’s professional staff, including licensed therapists, social workers and lawyers, follow trauma-informed rehabilitative care practices. Staff development and training is considered key to effective program management and service provision.

Since its founding in 1972, 1736 Family Crisis Center has grown from a single youth shelter to an internationally recognized provider of comprehensive, specialized rehabilitation and prevention services for troubled children, youth and families. The agency began as an emergency youth shelter to care for teens found sleeping on local beaches after having run away or having been abandoned by parents/guardians. In 1981, the agency opened its first emergency domestic violence shelter (DV) and in 1984, LA County’s first clinically-oriented transitional DV shelter. Today, through a network of 30 residential and community-based service sites spanning Los Angeles and Orange counties, the agency offers life-saving, trauma-informed, rehabilitative care to special needs populations free of charge. Each year, our agency assists approximately 6,000 clients directly, including more than 2,500 children, and reaches 20,000 additional community members through community outreach and education.

Financials

1736 Family Crisis Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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1736 Family Crisis Center

Board of directors
as of 7/15/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Ronald C. Troupe

retired

Term: 2020 - 2025

Terry Eddy

International Code Council, Senior Vice President, Human Resources (Retired)

Robert Smith

R.E. Smith & Associates

Cozette Vergari

Vergari & Associates

Ernestine Frazier

Wendell Barner

Berkshire Hathaway

Renate Hild

Retired, Westchester/LAX Chamber of Commerce

Ron Troupe

Retired, University of Redlands, Board of Trustees

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/15/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data