Disease, Disorders, Medical Disciplines

ARTHRITIS NATIONAL RESEARCH FOUNDATION

Funding research to cure arthritis.

aka ANRF

Irvine, CA

Mission

The Arthritis National Research Foundation funds scientists in their efforts to cure arthritis by discovering the causes of arthritis and related diseases including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, juvenile arthritis and other autoimmune diseases.

Ruling Year

1973

CEO

Dr. Zaher Nahle

Main Address

19200 Von Karmen Avenue Ste. 350

Irvine, CA 92612 USA

Keywords

Arthritis research, medical research, post-doctoral grant awards, arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, juvenile arthritis, JRA, RA, JIA, arthritis national, research foundation, ANRF, rheumatoid, rheumatology, autoimmune, autoimmune disease, arthritic, research

EIN

95-6043953

 Number

1521990369

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Arthritis (G51)

Arthritis (H51)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

The research grants we fund provide sorely-needed resources to these top scientists studying the human immune system and all rheumatic disorders, with a particular focus on its most prevalent diseases – osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus), and juvenile arthritis (JA). The scientists funded by ANRF have attained their M.D. and/or Ph.D. degrees, are working in top laboratory environments, have a cutting-edge idea, but no funds to take their research ideas to the next level. ANRF provides the grant funding at this pivotal time in their early research careers so that the scientific results derived from their ANRF-funded work qualifies these young scientists to obtain a larger, multi-year grant from a major funding source like the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Their ANRF grant enables them to hire technicians, graduate students and supplies necessary to speed along the work toward their project goals.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Research Grants

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

To fund a minimum of 10 new, qualified scientists in the field of arthritis research.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

People with diseases and illnesses

Related program

Research Grants

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

The Scientific Advisory Board is devised of the finest researchers in the country. They screen grant applications received each year for the new scientists who might make the next major breakthrough.

Out of the funded researchers, that over 90% remain in the field of research after the funding is depleted.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

People with diseases and illnesses

Related program

Research Grants

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

To date, 95% of the all scientists funded by ANRF have chosen to remain in research. Those who have left have moved to pharmaceutical companies. Most recently, 100% are still in the field.

Utilize social media streams to build a following to increase our reach in an effort to relay awareness that arthritis affects all age groups and the need for research to find a cure. Increase reach a

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

People with diseases and illnesses

Related program

Research Grants

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

ANRF's mission is to fund research. However, awareness of the need for this funding is critical as many do not understand that arthritis affects all age groups. Awareness is key to funding a cure.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

The Arthritis National Research Foundation (ANRF) is a 501(c) (3) organization based in Long Beach, CA, dedicated to one mission: funding arthritis research. We do this through a competitive selection process. The Scientific Advisory Board, comprised of world renowned physician-scientists, conducts an annual, NIH-level review of the applications received.  The best and brightest young, post-doctoral investigators rise to the top.  Many of our grant recipients made discoveries that led to new and better treatments.

ANRF has funded brilliant young MD and/or PhD investigators for over 40 years at institutions across the U.S., encouraging them to develop their new ideas and remain in medical research. By asking new questions and finding new results, these brilliant scientists supported by ANRF advance the field of arthritis and autoimmune research.

We focus on newer investigators who are early assistant professor level (or senior post-doc) transitioning to independence. The funding from ANRF gives them the opportunity to pursue their novel research idea and gain the experience and results needed to apply to national funding agencies like the National Institutes of Health. Essentially, ANRF grants provide training “venture capital" for these young medical researchers to pursue their ideas independently and remain in medical research.

The Arthritis National Research Foundation makes its research grant award decisions through a highly competitive selection process.  The ANRF Scientific Advisory Board, comprised of world renowned physician-scientists, conducts an annual, NIH-level review of the applications received.  At the review meeting held in April, each fully reviewed application is considered and scored with the final ranking submitted to the Board of Directors for funding.  The best and brightest young investigators rise to the top.  Many of our former grant recipients made discoveries that led to new and better treatments. Please visit the ANRF website (www.CureArthritis.org) to learn more about the success of our former grant recipients.

During fiscal 2015-16, over $1.2 million awarded to 13 scientists at nonprofit research institutions across the U.S. These researchers represent the top 16% of all applicants. Some of the research institutions represented by this year's grantees include Harvard Medical School, Hospital for Special Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, UCLA, NYU School of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cincinnati Children's Hospital and Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute. The grant review process for 2016-17 will commence in mid-January, 2016.

ANRF grant recipients study arthritic diseases at the genetic and molecular levels. Work in osteoarthritis, the “wear and tear" of joint tissues and the most prevalent form of arthritis, is focused on re-growing joint cartilage and utilizing genetic therapy. Studies in juvenile arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and the other autoimmune forms of arthritis are focused in three phases of autoimmunity to understand, prevent and interrupt the disease process.

In the past several years, ANRF has redoubled its efforts to increase awareness that kids get arthritis too.

ANRF has a Scientific Advisory Board of the finest researchers in the country to screen and review in depth the grant applications received each year. Their mission is to look for the new scientists who might make the next major breakthrough. The Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) is led by Chairman Carl F. Ware, Ph.D., head of the Division of Molecular Immunology at the La Jolla Institute of Allergy and Immunology and Bevra Hahn, M.D., head of UCLA Medical School's Department of Rheumatology and former president of the American College of Rheumatology.

The volunteer physician-scientists of the Scientific Advisory Board guide ANRF to wisely place the research dollars available into projects which will ultimately help the most people. Grant applicants submit proposals in mid-January; ANRF receives an average of 55 to 65 applications each year. Most applicants submit a budget requesting the maximum $100,000 per year. After an initial triage vote by Scientific Board members, each of approximately 35 to 40 applications receives a complete review by two reviewer-scientists. Scientific Advisory Board members conduct the bulk of the reviews, but ANRF also has a Scientific Advisory Committee of outside reviewers who conduct reviews on an as-needed basis. Each reviewer submits a one- to two-page written review of each grant, including two scores based on 1) the scientific merit of the proposal and 2) the proposal's relevance to arthritis. The SAB has an all-day review meeting once a year, culminating in a ranking of proposals for presentation to the ANRF Board of Directors. At its next meeting held shortly after the SAB review meeting, the Board of Directors then makes the final funding decisions based on the overall budget for the organization. All applicants are notified of the funding decisions no later than April 30.

The Arthritis National Research Foundation asked an independent review panel of experts to assess the organization. The panel's review assessed both the research and researchers funded by ANRF. “The ANRF has achieved a remarkable level of success," according to the independent report published in 2013. We invite you to read their report on our website at: http://www.curearthritis.org/independent-review/

Additionally, ANRF has funded early-stage researchers which have lead to some of the most important break-throughs in treatments to date for those suffering from arthritis including the Granger Lab out of UCI from 1977-82 which led to biologics. Biologics treat those with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and come in the form of name brands such as Humira and Enbrel. Biologics have greatly improved treatment for many people with RA.

Dr. Granger's success is one example of the importance of funding these young, brilliant scientists to ensure they receive the support needed to get their lab up and running. Below are a few more examples of ANRF's progress toward our mission of finding cure.

2008-2012: Research Highlights
Shigeru Miyaki, PhD at The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, discovers natural molecule that regulates the growth of cartilage

Nunzio Bottini, MD at La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology and Massimo Bottini, PhD at Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute, both in San Diego, CA, use nanotechnology to develop focused targets for arthritis drug delivery

Chuanju Liu, PhD, of New York University, discovers a growth factor in the OA joint that, if blocked, may prevent or ameliorate joint inflammation and damage.

Since 1970, ANRF has funded over 250 brilliant young scientists. Our research projects have led to important new information and treatments including the very biologics that are being used to treat those suffering from Rheumatoid Arthritis. Due to reduced funding coming from NIH and related funding sources for these early-stage researchers, we have increased the number of grants we support to 10-20 per year totaling $1.3 million (FY 2016-2017). Our work and mission has attracted a world-renowned Scientific Advisory Board of physician-scientists who ensure that the best of the best are funded annually. And in 2017 ANRF received a perfect score on our Charity Navigator ranking and for the 9th straight year received 4 stars placing us at the top 1% of all charities in the USA.

Michael Thatcher, President and CEO of Charity Navigator, stated: "Only 1% of the charities we evaluate have received at least 9 consecutive 4-star evaluations, indicating that Arthritis National Research Foundation outperforms most other charities in America. This exceptional designation from Charity Navigator sets Arthritis National Research Foundation apart from its peers and demonstrates to the public its trustworthiness."

Lastly, we are proud that over 90 cents of each dollar received goes directly to fund program. We work hard to ensure we maintain efficient operations.

Moving forward, the board approved a strategic growth plan which includes adding a full time development professional in order to help grow the fundraising program. We believe we are closing in on more treatments and getting closer to solving more of the mysteries that will lead to a cure. And that means that more research needs to be funded. With this new development professional comes other growth plans including growing the volunteer board and launching additional fundraising initiatives to bolster the existing campaigns. ANRF has many exciting new marketing and outreach plans to match as there is a need to educate the public that Arthritis affects all age groups - including children.

External Reviews

Awards

4-Stars 2010

Charity Navigator

4-Stars 2009

Charity Navigator

Photos

Financials

ARTHRITIS NATIONAL RESEARCH FOUNDATION

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Not Applicable

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Not Applicable

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Not Applicable

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Not Applicable

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Not Applicable

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

Race & Ethnicity

Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members, Senior Staff, Full-Time Staff and Part-Time Staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies

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We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
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We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
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We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
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We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
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We have a diversity committee in place
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We have a diversity manager in place
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We have a diversity plan
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We use other methods to support diversity