Big Brothers Big Sisters Hawaii Inc.

Igniting the biggest possible futures for Hawaii’s youth.

aka Big Brothers Big Sisters of Honolulu, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Maui, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Kauai   |   Honolulu, HI   |  www.bbbshawaii.org

Mission

Our mission is to build and support one-to-one relationships to ignite the biggest possible futures for Hawaii’s youth.

Notes from the nonprofit

Big Brothers Big Sisters is about one-to-one friendships, but is made up of a community of caring, giving people hundreds of thousands strong, changing what it means for children to grow up in Hawaii.

Ruling year info

1966

President/CEO

Mr. Dennis Brown

Main address

2119 N. King Street Suite 202

Honolulu, HI 96819 USA

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EIN

99-0109970

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Student Services and Organizations (B80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There are a variety of at-risk children living in our island communities that are in need of extra support. This includes youth who have a single / deployed / foster / incarcerated parent, live in poverty or are homeless, are of Hawaiian ancestry, or have recently immigrated. We serve these youth, as well as children who have a history of abuse, neglect, or involvement with the juvenile justice system. Our preventative one-to-one mentoring programs help these children and teens overcome adversity and stay on the right track by placing positive role models in their lives during a critical time of development.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

One-to-One Mentoring

Every child we serve is unique. We prioritize services to youth from low-income and single parent households, and kids of Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander descent. We also serve those who have been involved with the juvenile justice system or who have a history of abuse and neglect. More than 65% of youth in our program live in a foster home or with a single parent, grandparent, or another relative; 59% qualify for Title I free and reduced lunch programs; and more than 50% are of Hawaiian ancestry. All families in our program struggle to make ends meet or face other hardships that put their children at a disadvantage. Having the consistent support of a positive role model helps level the playing field for these kids and encourages them to reach their fullest potential despite their circumstances.

We provide carefully created and professionally supported one-to-one mentoring relationships to youth who face adversity. School counselors, therapists, court officials and other community partners refer youth who may benefit from our program. Our case managers pair each child who joins our program with a volunteer mentor based on a variety of factors, such as gender, geography, interests, career goals, and personal preferences. Our case managers are the “magic makers” at the center of each successful one-to-one mentoring pair. Their expertise and choice of a mentor sets the stage for each lifelong friendship. They are the coaches who hold together parents, youth and volunteers when troubles arise as they help bridge communication gaps.

After a youth is matched with a mentor, they spend time doing activities they enjoy together. Mentors take the time to listen, encourage and model positive behavior while providing new opportunities that children may not otherwise experience. Outings can be simple occasions – cooking a meal, changing a tire, taking a walk to the beach…every interaction is a positive opportunity to build the relationship and trust which are critical steps toward achieving a child’s biggest possible future.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Accredited Charity 2020

Awards

Best Places to Work 2013

Hawaii Business Magazine

Affiliations & memberships

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America Affiliate 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

percentage of at-risk youth served who improved or maintained academic success, positive behaviors, socio-emotional growth, or avoidance of risky behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goal of Big Brothers Big Sisters Hawaii’s mentoring programs is to give children facing adversity the tools to achieve success in life by matching them in long-term relationships with role models. This results in positive short-term and long-terms outcomes for youth in three main areas: educational success, avoidance of risky behaviors, and increased social and emotional well-being.

Educationally, children in the Big Brothers Big Sisters mentoring program have higher grades, better scholastic competence, and a greater desire to graduate from high school and attend a four-year college.

Socially, children in our programs feel more accepted by their peers and more connected to their family. They are also more likely to say no to drugs, alcohol, skipping school, or getting in fights.

Emotionally, children in the Big Brothers Big Sisters mentoring program have greater feelings of self-worth and therefore, more hope and higher aspirations for the future.

Instead of focusing on a particular area of youth service such as education or health, the goal at Big Brothers Big Sisters Hawaii is to address the many factors that impact overall child well-being and help a variety of at-risk children achieve greater positive outcomes and dreams for the future. Big Brothers Big Sisters Hawaii's one-to-one mentoring programs help at-risk youth overcome various types of challenges by placing positive role models in their lives during a critical time of child development and professionally supporting each relationship to guarantee positive outcomes.

By matching at-risk youth with positive role models, we help children avoid risky behavior such as abusing drugs and alcohol, joining a gang, or becoming pregnant; achieve educational success by encouraging and motivating kids to stay in school and graduate from college; and develop higher aspirations and hope for their futures by exposing children to a variety of new experiences and opportunities.

Big Brothers Big Sisters Hawaii excels in all of the skills and experience necessary to run a successful mentoring program. We are an affiliate of Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, the world’s largest donor and volunteer supported mentoring network. Our programs are built upon Big Brothers Big Sisters of America’s research-driven mentoring service delivery model. We have also served youth in Hawai‘i for 57 years. We have a long history of providing successful mentoring services for thousands of at-risk youth and facilitating fulfilling volunteer experiences for community and school mentors.

In 2019, more than 100% of youth in our programs showed academic, behavioral, or emotional growth. This led to better grades, stronger relationships with classmates and siblings, more self-confidence, and greater motivation as well as less instances of acting out, skipping school, and abusing drugs and alcohol. We anticipate achieving these same positive results in 2020.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters Hawaii Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Big Brothers Big Sisters Hawaii Inc.

Board of directors
as of 12/01/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Dennis Rae

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/25/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data