Hawai‘i Foodbank, Inc.

aka Hawaii Foodbank   |   Honolulu, HI   |  http://www.hawaiifoodbank.org/

Mission

Hawai‘i Foodbank nourishes our ‘ohana today and works to end hunger tomorrow.

Ruling year info

1986

President & CEO

Amy Marvin

Main address

2611 Kilihau Street

Honolulu, HI 96819-2021 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

99-0220699

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Food insecurity is a pressing issue across Hawaii, with approximately 1 in 6 people anticipated to struggle with hunger this year, including 82,000 - or 1 in 4 - children. According to Feeding America, Hawaii has the second highest rate of child hunger in the nation. Unemployment remains among the highest in the United States, and the University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization (UHERO) found that the workforce in Hawaii has dropped by 25,000 since the onset of the pandemic with no indication whether it might rebound. Since March 2020, Hawaii Foodbank has operated at a significantly higher pace. In the first three months of COVID alone, we distributed approximately 144,000 pounds of food every day, in stark contrast to pre-pandemic levels of 46,000 pounds per day. In FY21, we distributed more than 25 million pounds of food, which is double the amount distributed in 2019. We continue to serve 50 percent more individuals than pre-pandemic, even though food and monetary donations

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food 4 Keiki School and Keiki Pantry Program

The Food 4 Keiki School and Keiki Pantry program is a critical food resource for young students and their families. Pantries provide after-school snacks as well as family food bags filled with canned proteins and meals, dry goods, and more to take home. During the 2021-22 school year, we worked to revitalize the program after many temporary closures during the pandemic. Currently, we have 29 active pantries – 19 on O‘ahu and 10 on Kaua‘i. Our long-term goal is to have a pantry in every Title I school on O‘ahu and Kaua‘i.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Children and youth

Hawaii Foodbank participates in the Senior Farmers' Market Nutrition Program, which provides voucher booklets worth $50.00 to eligible kupuna around the island. Our goal is to provide fresh, nutritious and locally-grown fruits & vegetables for our kupuna. Vouchers are redeemable at with certified farmers (visible certification signage on-site) at participating farmers' markets during Spring and Summer. Applications for program participation are available annually.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

Our Food 4 Keiki Feeding Our Future is a summer feeding program for children at risk of hunger. The Foodbank partners with the Sodexo Foundation, University of Hawaii at Manoa and several Foodbank member agencies to serve hot lunches to children on Oahu. Feeding Our Future distributes more than 11,000 meals to over 300 kids, ages 4 through 17.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

For more than 20 years, Hawai‘i Foodbank and participating food partner agencies have distributed millions of pounds of fresh produce, assorted dry goods, and non-perishable food items to under-served communities through the ‘Ohana Produce Plus program. Distributions take place in more than 30 communities on O‘ahu and included more than 3.6 million pounds of fresh produce and nearly 5.1 million pounds of baked goods, dairy products, eggs, cereal, snacks, beverages, canned goods, and other items in 2021. For many, ‘Ohana Produce Plus is their only source of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Population(s) Served
Families
Seniors

Hawaii Foodbank's Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP), also known as the senior food box program, distributes monthly food boxes to improve the health and mental status of low-income kupuna. The boxes contain between 30 - 35 lbs of shelf-stable items such as canned meats and meals, fruits, vegetables, peanut butter, non-fat dry milk, cereal, juice, pasta/rice, etc., along with a block of cheese.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Best Places to Work 2009

Hawaii Business Magazine

Best Places to Work 2010

Hawaii Business Magazine

Highest 4-Star Rating for Sound Management 2010

Charity Navigator

Highest 4-Star Rating for Sound Management 2011

Charity Navigator

Highest 4-Star Rating for Sound Management 2012

Charity Navigator

Highest 4-Star Rating for Sound Management 2013

Charity Navigator

Highest 4-Star Rating for Sound Management 2014

Charity Navigator

Highest 4-Star Rating for Sound Management 2015

Charity Navigator

Highest 4-Star Rating for Sound Management 2016

Charity Navigator

Highest 4-Star Rating for Sound Management 2017

Charity Navigator

Highest 4-Star Rating for Sound Management 2018

Charity Navigator

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Pounds of produce distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Hawaii Foodbank nourishes our ohana today and works to end hunger tomorrow. We envision a future where all in Hawaii have access to safe, nutritious, and sufficient food all year round.
We are dedicated to our core work of sourcing and distributing food in order to meet the immediate food security needs of our community while also working to expand our impact. We seek to be a collaborative partner across the hunger response landscape, a proactive leader in disaster response, the healthy option for those experiencing food insecurity, and a partner and a leader for efforts to eliminate hunger in our islands.

1. Cultivate strong partnerships and networks by supporting our network of partner agencies and partnering with affiliated food banks across the state and other anti-hunger organizations on shared food security efforts.
2. Be active in disaster preparedness and response by formalizing partnerships with government agencies and first responders and focusing on preparedness in our organization and across our network.
3. Advance nutrition and health by reducing unhealthy options, increasing fresh and local options, and expanding learning opportunities around food preparation and nutrition.
4. Expand efforts to combat hunger by focusing on equitable access and filling gaps in services and advocating for economic and financial supports that help people access food.

Launched in 1982, Hawaii Foodbank is Hawaii’s leading hunger relief organization and is a trusted and established resource for those in need of perishable and non-perishable food items. It serves the island of Oahu and the County of Kauai directly while partnering with The Food Basket to serve Hawaii County and Maui Food Bank to serve Maui County. Hawaii Foodbank is the largest food bank in Hawaii and the only food bank in the state to have Feeding America membership. Hawaii Foodbank has a staff approximately 60 employees on Oahu and Kauai and works with more than 7,000 volunteers each year.

Financials

Hawai‘i Foodbank, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Hawai‘i Foodbank, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 06/29/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

David Herndon

Hawaii Medical Services Association

Term: 2018 -

Neill Char

First Hawaiian Bank

Scott Gamble

LH Gamble Company

Christina Hause

Kaiser Permanente

Peter Heilmann

Matson

David Herndon

HMSA

Jennifer Lam

Bank of Hawaii

Reggie Maldonado

Pasha Hawaii

Michael Miller

Tiki's Grill & Bar Waikiki

Darin Shigeta

American Savings Bank

Larry "Keola" Siafuafu

Hawaiian Electric Company

James Starshak

Community Volunteer

Toby Tamaye

AT Marketing

Mark Tonini

Hawaii Foodservice Alliance

Jeff Vigilla

Chef Point of View

James Wataru

United Public Workers Union, AFSCME

Jason Wong

Sysco Hawaii

Denise Yamaguchi

Hawaii Wine & Food Festival

Lauren Zirbel

Hawaii Food Industry Association

Amy Marvin

Hawai‘i Foodbank

Kathryn Ellman

Community Volunteer

Craig Shikuma

Kobayashi, Sugita & Goda, LLP

Sonia Topenio

Bank of Hawaii

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/27/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data