Human Services

Hawaii Foodbank, Inc.

  • Honolulu, HI
  • http://www.hawaiifoodbank.org/

Mission Statement

The people of Hawaii are one ohana. The Hawaii Foodbank provides food so that no one in our family goes hungry. We work to gather food and support from our communities. We then distribute food through charitable agencies to those in need. Our mission is from the heart, and we will fulfill our mission with integrity, humanity and aloha.

Main Programs

  1. Food 4 Keiki BackPack Program
  2. Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program
  3. Feeding Our Future
  4. Ohana Produce Program
  5. Commodity Supplemental Food Program
Service Areas

Self-reported

Hawaii

Islands of Oahu and Kauai

 

Works with partnering distribution organizations on Big Island and Maui

ruling year

1986

President & CEO

Self-reported

Mr. Dick Grimm

Keywords

Self-reported

Hawaii, Hunger, feeding, food, meals, food bank, foodbank

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Also Known As

HFB

EIN

99-0220699

 Number

1119725355

Physical Address

2611 Kilihau Street

Honolulu, 96819

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The Hawaii Foodbank was founded in 1982 by John White. His Foodbank concept became a reality when the Good Samaritan Law governing food donations passed the legislature in 1982. The law encouraged food donors to donate unmarketable products by protecting them from liability except in cases of gross negligence or wanton acts. In May of 1983, a small warehouse became home to the first Hawaii Foodbank operation. White, along with a single driver, started the distribution of food, totaling 500,000 pounds to 20 member agencies that year. Since then, the Hawaii Foodbank has grown immensely with distribution now at over 12.8 million pounds to over 250 member agencies annually. Member agencies represent homeless shelters, halfway houses, low-income child care facilities, senior centers, emergency pantries, soup kitchens, rehabilitation centers, and youth programs. Over 287,000 individuals receive help from our agencies including the homeless, the elderly, abused children, battered women, the working poor, the newly unemployed, the physically and mentally challenged, and families experiencing temporary emergencies. The Hawaii Foodbank is a certified member of Feeding America, the National Foodbank Network. Certification means that our operation meets a national uniform standard for sanitation, food handling, health and safety practices and inventory management. The Hawaii Foodbank is sustained by a combination of agency fees, fundraising activities, private donations, foundation grants, program grants, and the Aloha United Way.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Food 4 Keiki BackPack Program

Our Food 4 Keiki BackPack Program targets both unserved (Princess Ka`iulani Elementary School) and underserved (students) populations. Hawaii’s children are the largest population in need of food. They are also one of the most vulnerable to the effects of hunger. Research has shown lack of nutrition has a negative effect on children’s: physical development, behavioral and social skills, learning and school performance, health, weight and quality of life. The students at Princess Ka`iulani Elementary School in Kalihi-Palama face these challenges. Of the 400 students who attend the school, 350 qualify to receive free or reduced price lunches because of low-income family status. These children rely on school meals during the week and are at risk of hunger over the weekends without them. They need nutritious food they can prepare themselves on weekends when families may not be able to provide meals and snacks.

Category

Food, Agriculture & Nutrition

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Budget

Program 2

Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program

The Hawaii Foodbank is distributing Senior Farmers' Market Nutrition Program voucher booklets worth $50.00 at its member agencies around the island. Our goal is to provide fresh and locally-grown fruits & vegetables for our seniors. Vouchers are redeemableat any City & County People’s Open Market vendors certified for this program from June – October 31, 2010.

Category

Food, Agriculture & Nutrition

Population(s) Served

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Budget

Program 3

Feeding Our Future

Fiscal year 2010 was the sixth year of Feeding Our Future, a summer feeding program for children at risk of hunger. The Foodbank partnered with the Sodexho Foundation, University of Hawaii at Manoa and six Foodbank member agencies to serve hot lunches to 450 children on Oahu.
From June 14 through July 23, 2010, lunches were distributed through the Boys and Girls Club of Hawaii extensions in Waianae and Ewa Beach, Honolulu Community Action Program Youth Services, Kokua Kalihi Valley Youth & Family Services, the Mutual Housing Association and the Lighthouse Outreach Center. Through Feeding Our Future, agencies served approximately 14,500 meals to over 500 kids, ages 4 through 17.

Category

Food, Agriculture & Nutrition

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Budget

Program 4

Ohana Produce Program

The Hawaii Foodbank distributed 2.6 million pounds of fresh produce through the Ohana Produce Program in fiscal year 2010. The program distributes nutritious, fresh fruits andvegetables to underserved communities where there are higher levels of hunger, homelessness, low-income house-holds or fewer outreach programs that are able to feed those in need. This year, the program served 23 communities on Oahu through 26 partner agencies.

The Ohana Produce Program provided 29,800 people on 

Oahu each month with fresh fruits and vegetables. Each person served represented several family members, meaning the program more people than actually reported. The Ohana Produce Program will continue to seek partner agencies that will “close the gaps” and service communities on the North Shore where distributions are fewer and further apart. The challenge will be identifying agencies that have the capacity to host a distribution and provide the amount of produce donations needed to serve the hungry in those communities.

Category

Food, Agriculture & Nutrition

Population(s) Served

Adults

Budget

Program 5

Commodity Supplemental Food Program

Hawaii is one of 7 states that have been approved to distribute food boxes to improve the health of low-income elderly persons of at least 60 years by supplementing their
diets with nutritious USDA foods.

Category

Food Distribution

Population(s) Served

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

None

None

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    "The people of Hawaii are one ohana. The Hawaii Foodbank provides food so that no one in our family goes hungry. We work to gather food and support from our communities. We then distribute food through charitable agencies to those in need. Our mission is from the heart, and we will fulfill our mission with integrity, humanity and aloha."
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Hawaii Foodbank is the only nonprofit 501(c)(3) agency in the state of Hawaii that collects, warehouses and distributes mass quantities of both perishable and nonperishable food through nearly 200 charitable agencies on Oahu and Kauai. Our organization forms a vital link with food donors, charitable agencies and the hungry in Hawaii by collecting, inspecting, storing and distributing donated and purchased food. Last year, the Hawaii Foodbank distributed over 12.8 million pounds of food warehouse locations on Oahu and Kauai. Of the total amount distributed, about one-third consisted of fresh produce. We also shipped 115,036 pounds of food to Maui Food Bank.

    Hawaii Foodbank has served the people of Hawaii for the past 35 years. Whether feeding the needy or distributing emergency food, Hawaii Foodbank has been there to help rebuild lives and give hope for a better tomorrow.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Hawaii Foodbank accomplishes its mission each year through the strategic initiatives implemented and the committed hard work of its people who are dedicated to feeding Hawaii's hungry. Working with the staff of about 40 staff on Oahu and Kauai is our ohana of volunteers. The Hawaii Foodbank ohana of volunteers generously gives of their time to help fulfill our mission of providing hunger relief. Thousands of volunteers are involved in special events, community projects, warehouse operations, agency programs, and administrative work. Mahalo to our volunteer board members, community groups, and individuals for donating more than 24,000 hours of volunteer service hours last year.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Hawaii Foodbank serves 287,000 people annually. That is 1 in 5 islanders who receive food assistance, including more than 90,000 keiki (children) and kupuna (seniors).

    Last year, Hawaii Foodbank partnered with nearly 200 member agencies, distributing over 12.8 million pounds of food, of which about one-third consisted of fresh produce. Dedicated agency staff and volunteers assembled and distributed food bags, prepared and served meals, and organized community-wide food distributions across Oahu. We also shipped 115,036 pounds of food to Maui Food Bank.

    Hawaii Foodbank is an active member of Aloha United Way and Kauai United Way's safety net and participates in the 211 information, resource, and referral line.

    Hawaii Foodbank participates in Feeding America's quadrennial Hunger in America study. The results are published in the Hunger in Hawaii study and reflects Hawaii-specific statistics. The information gleaned from the reports is used for strategic and program planning by the organization's board and executive staff.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Dr. Ray Perryman, President and CEO of The Perryman Group said, "Unlike many social problems, hunger involves a relatively simple answer. If people are provided food, the problem is solved. While the underlying causes certainly need to be addressed, the major harms can be avoided in a straightforward manner."

    Through the Ohana Produce Plus program and its other food distribution programs, Hawaii Foodbank helps stem the social costs of hunger in our community. These preventative measures are an investment into Oahu's economic vitality.

    But more than that, receiving healthy, nutritious food can benefit a family's ability to free up financial resources. Feeding America's Colleen Callahan sums it up this way, "Food pantries across the country free up families' groceries budgets, so they can use the money they do have to pay bills, go to school, and receive medical care. When you think of it that way, it's amazing how far donating a simple meal can go. A simple meal could be all a working family needs to pay that bill that enables them to stay afloat so they can keep sailing towards a brighter future. A simple meal is so much more than food - it's a gift that could change lives."

    We will not rest as long as there are hungry islanders in Hawaii. Hawaii Foodbank, its staff, volunteers, and donors are committed to collecting, inspecting, storing, and distributing food until hunger is abolished.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Hawaii

Islands of Oahu and Kauai

 

Works with partnering distribution organizations on Big Island and Maui

Social Media

Funding Needs

Hawaii Foodbank's Top 5 Most Wanted Items: 1. Monetary donations 2. Canned protein (tuna, meat, chicken) 3. Canned meals (stew, spaghetti, chili) 4. Canned vegetables and canned fruit 5. Rice Of the 12.8 million pounds of food distributed by Hawaii Foodbank, nearly 2.3 million pounds were purchased, including 1.4 million pounds of fresh produce - thanks to monetary donations and grant funding.

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

HAWAII FOODBANK, INC.
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Hawaii Foodbank, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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President & CEO

Mr. Dick Grimm

BIO

The Hawaii Foodbank Board of Directors elected Dick Grimm, president of Hawaii Foodbank, Inc., in August 2000, after serving as interim president of the organization since March 2000. Previously, Mr. Grimm was a member of the board of directors and served as chairman of the Finance, Food Drive and Long Range Planning committees. Mr. Grimm?s commitment to the hungry people of Hawaii has spanned more than a decade of service. His past community service includes involvement on various boards of local organizations such as Board of Advisors to the President of Kamehameha Schools, Central YMCA, Chaminade Board of Regents, Easter Seals Society, Hawaii Television Broadcasters Association, Honolulu Rotary, Junior Achievement, Metro YMCA, the State of Hawaii Sports Task Force and Clean Hawaii. In 1998, Mr. Grimm retired after 35 years in the television broadcasting industry. During his more than 35 years in Hawaii, Mr. Grimm has been involved in other business ventures in addition to managing KITV, KGMB and Shamrock Television. Of note was his start-up of Garage Doors of Hawaii, which he owned and operated from 1969 to 1984, and his involvement with the start-up of Oahu Wireless Cable, which was sold to GTE in 1997 and is now known as Americast. A long-time member of the Outrigger Canoe Club, Mr. Grimm also served on numerous committees and chaired both the public relations and long range planning committees. Mr. Grimm is also a member of the Waialae Country Club board of directors. Mr. Grimm is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin, where he lettered in football and boxing. He is also a former U.S. Marine, who proudly served his country in Japan, Okinawa and the Philippines.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Linda Chu Takayama

Attorney-at-Law

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?